List of Olympic Games host cities

This is a list of host cities of the Olympic Games, both summer and winter, since the modern Olympics began in 1896. Since then, summer and winter games have usually celebrated a four-year period known as an Olympiad; summer and winter games normally held in staggered even years. There have been 28 Summer Olympic Games held in 23 cities, and 23 Winter Olympic Games held in 20 cities. In addition, three summer and two winter editions of the Games were scheduled to take place but later cancelled due to war: Berlin (summer) in 1916; TokyoHelsinki (summer) and SapporoGarmisch-Partenkirchen (winter) in 1940; and London (summer) and Cortina (winter) in 1944. The 1906 Intercalated Olympics were officially sanctioned and held in Athens. However, in 1949, the International Olympic Committee (IOC), decided to unrecognize the 1906 Games.[1][2] The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo were postponed for the first time in the Olympics history to summer 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic with the 2022 Winter Olympics being held roughly six months later in Beijing.[3][4]

Map of host cities and countries of the modern summer (orange) and winter (blue) Olympics. Tap or hover over a city to show its name.

The Youth Olympic Games are held every four years in staggered summer and winter events consistent with the current Olympic Games format, though in reverse order with Winter Games held in leap years instead of Summer Games. The first summer version was held in Singapore from 14 to 26 August 2010 while the first winter version was held in Innsbruck, Austria from 13 to 22 January 2012.[5]

Five cities have been chosen by the IOC to host upcoming Olympic Games: Tokyo for the 2020 Summer Olympics, Beijing for the 2022 Winter Olympics, Paris for the 2024 Summer Olympics, Milan–Cortina for the 2026 Winter Olympics, and Los Angeles for the 2028 Summer Olympics. Additional two cities have been chosen by the IOC to host upcoming Youth Olympic Games: Dakar for the 2022 Summer Youth Olympics and Gangwon Province for the 2024 Winter Youth Olympics.

In 2022, Beijing will become the first city that has held both the summer and the winter Olympic Games. Eleven cities will have hosted the Olympic Games more than once: Athens (1896 and 2004 Summer Olympics), Paris (1900, 1924 and 2024 Summer Olympics), London (1908, 1948 and 2012 Summer Olympics), St. Moritz (1928 and 1948 Winter Olympics), Lake Placid (1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics), Los Angeles (1932, 1984 and 2028 Summer Olympics), Cortina d'Ampezzo (1956 and 2026 Winter Olympics), Innsbruck (1964 and 1976 Winter Olympics and 2012 Winter Youth Olympics), Tokyo (1964 and 2020 Summer Olympics), Lillehammer (1994 Winter Olympics and 2016 Winter Youth Olympics), Gangwon Province (Pyeongchang) (2018 Winter Olympics and 2024 Winter Youth Olympics) and Beijing (2008 Summer Olympics and 2022 Winter Olympics). Stockholm hosted the 1912 Summer Olympics and the equestrian portion of the 1956 Summer Olympics. London became the first city to have hosted three Games with the 2012 Summer Olympics. Paris will become the second city to do this with the 2024 Summer Olympics, followed by Los Angeles as the third in 2028. The United States has hosted a total of eight Olympic Games, more than any other country, followed by France with five editions. Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Austria, Canada, Italy, Japan and Germany have each hosted three Games.

The Games have primarily been hosted in the regions of Europe (32 editions) and the Americas (14 editions); seven Games have been hosted in Asia and two have been hosted in Oceania. In 2010, Singapore became Southeast Asia's first Olympic host city for the inaugural Summer Youth Olympics, while Rio de Janeiro became South America's first Olympic host city with the 2016 Summer Olympics, followed by Buenos Aires with the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics. The 2022 Summer Youth Olympics in Dakar will become the first-ever Games to be held on the African continent. Other major geographic regions which have never hosted the Olympics include the Middle East, Central Asia, the Indian subcontinent, Central America and the Caribbean.

Host cities are selected by the IOC membership, usually seven years in advance.[6] The selection process lasts approximately two years. In the first stage, any city in the world may submit an application to become a host city. After 10 months, the Executive Board of the IOC decides which applicant cities will become official candidates as based on the recommendation of a working group that reviews the applications. In a second stage, the candidate cities are investigated thoroughly by an Evaluation Commission, which then submits a final short list of cities to be considered for selection. The host city is then chosen by vote of the IOC session, a general meeting of IOC members.[7]

Olympic Games host cities

Host cities for Summer and Winter Olympic Games

City Country Year Continent Summer Winter Opening
ceremony
Closing
ceremony
Ref
Athens Greece 1896Europe S005I 6 April 189615 April 1896
Paris France 1900 S005II 14 May 190028 October 1900
St. Louis[lower-alpha 1] United States 1904North America S005III 1 July 190423 November 1904
Rome
London[lower-alpha 2]
 Italy
 United Kingdom
1908Europe S005IV 27 April 190831 October 1908
Stockholm Sweden 1912 S005V 6 July 191222 July 1912
Berlin Germany 1916 S006VI Cancelled due to WWI [11]
Antwerp[lower-alpha 3] Belgium 1920 S007VII 14 August 192012 September 1920 [12]
Chamonix France 1924 W001I 25 January 19245 February 1924 [13]
Paris France S008VIII 5 July 192427 July 1924 [14]
St. Moritz  Switzerland 1928 W002II 11 February 192819 February 1928 [15]
Amsterdam Netherlands S009IX 28 July 192812 August 1928 [16]
Lake Placid United States 1932North America W003III 4 February 193215 February 1932 [17]
Los Angeles United States S010X 30 July 193214 August 1932 [18]
Garmisch-Partenkirchen Germany 1936Europe W004IV 6 February 193616 February 1936 [19]
Berlin Germany S011XI 1 August 193616 August 1936 [20]
Sapporo
Garmisch-Partenkirchen[lower-alpha 4]
 Japan
 Germany
1940Asia
Europe
W005aV Cancelled due to WWII [11]
Tokyo
Helsinki[lower-alpha 5]
 Japan
 Finland
S012XII
Cortina d'Ampezzo Italy 1944Europe W005bV
London United Kingdom S013XIII
St. Moritz  Switzerland 1948Europe W005cV 30 January 19488 February 1948
London United Kingdom S014XIV 29 July 194814 August 1948
Oslo Norway 1952 W006VI 14 February 195225 February 1952
Helsinki Finland S015XV 19 July 19523 August 1952
Cortina d'Ampezzo Italy 1956 W007VII 26 January 19565 February 1956
Melbourne
Stockholm[lower-alpha 6]
 Australia
 Sweden
Australia
Europe
S016XVI 22 November 1956
10 June 1956
8 December 1956
17 June 1956
Squaw Valley United States 1960North America W008VIII 18 February 196028 February 1960
Rome ItalyEurope S017XVII 25 August 196011 September 1960
Innsbruck Austria 1964 W009IX 29 January 19649 February 1964
Tokyo JapanAsia S018XVIII 10 October 196424 October 1964
Grenoble France 1968Europe W010X 6 February 196818 February 1968
Mexico City MexicoNorth America S019XIX 12 October 196827 October 1968
Sapporo Japan 1972Asia W011XI 3 February 197213 February 1972
Munich West GermanyEurope S020XX 26 August 197211 September 1972
Denver
Innsbruck[lower-alpha 7]
 United States
 Austria
1976 North America
Europe
W012XII 4 February 197615 February 1976
Montreal CanadaNorth America S021XXI 17 July 19761 August 1976
Lake Placid United States 1980 W013XIII 13 February 198024 February 1980
Moscow Soviet UnionEurope[lower-alpha 8] S022XXII 19 July 19803 August 1980
Sarajevo Yugoslavia 1984Europe W014XIV 7 February 198419 February 1984
Los Angeles United StatesNorth America S023XXIII 28 July 198412 August 1984
Calgary Canada 1988 W015XV 13 February 198828 February 1988
Seoul South KoreaAsia S024XXIV 17 September 19882 October 1988
Albertville France 1992Europe W016XVI 8 February 199223 February 1992
Barcelona Spain S025XXV 25 July 19929 August 1992
Lillehammer Norway 1994 W017XVII 12 February 199427 February 1994
Atlanta United States 1996North America S026XXVI 19 July 19964 August 1996
Nagano Japan 1998Asia W018XVIII 7 February 199822 February 1998
Sydney Australia 2000Australia S027XXVII 15 September 20001 October 2000
Salt Lake City United States 2002North America W019XIX 8 February 200224 February 2002
Athens Greece 2004Europe S028XXVIII 13 August 200429 August 2004
Turin Italy 2006 W020XX 10 February 200626 February 2006
Beijing[lower-alpha 9] China 2008Asia S029XXIX 8 August 200824 August 2008
Vancouver Canada 2010North America W021XXI 12 February 201028 February 2010
London United Kingdom 2012 Europe S030XXX 27 July 201212 August 2012
Sochi Russia 2014Europe[lower-alpha 8] W022XXII 7 February 201423 February 2014
Rio de Janeiro Brazil 2016South America S031XXXI 5 August 201621 August 2016
Pyeongchang South Korea 2018Asia W023XXIII 9 February 201825 February 2018
Tokyo Japan 2020[lower-alpha 10] S032XXXII 23 July 20218 August 2021 [3]
Beijing China 2022 W024XXIV 4 February 202220 February 2022
Paris France 2024Europe S033XXXIII 26 July 202411 August 2024
Milan–Cortina d'Ampezzo Italy 2026 W025XXV 6 February 202622 February 2026
Los Angeles United States 2028North America S034XXXIV 21 July 20286 August 2028
(TBD) 2030(TBD) W026XXVI (TBD)(TBD)
(TBD) 2032(TBD) S035XXXV (TBD)(TBD)

Host cities for Youth Summer and Winter Olympic Games

City Country Year Continent Summer
(Youth)
Winter
(Youth)
Opening
ceremony
Closing
ceremony
Singapore Singapore 2010AsiaSY01I 14 August 201026 August 2010
Innsbruck Austria 2012EuropeWY01I 13 January 201222 January 2012
Nanjing China 2014AsiaSY02II 16 August 201428 August 2014
Lillehammer Norway 2016EuropeWY02II 12 February 201621 February 2016
Buenos Aires Argentina 2018South AmericaSY03III 6 October 201818 October 2018
Lausanne  Switzerland 2020EuropeWY03III 9 January 202022 January 2020
Gangwon South Korea2024AsiaWY03IV 19 January 20242 February 2024
Dakar Senegal 2026AfricaSY04IV (TBD) (TBD)
(TBD) 2028 (TBD)WY05V (TBD) (TBD)
(TBD) 2030 (TBD)SY05V (TBD) (TBD)

Host cities for multiple Summer and Winter Olympic Games and Youth Olympic Games

List of cities that hosted multiple editions of the Olympic Games
Rank City Country Continent Summer Olympics Winter Olympics Summer Youth Olympics Winter Youth Olympics Total
1 London United KingdomEurope 3 (1908, 1948, 2012) 3
Paris France 3 (1900, 1924, 2024)
Los Angeles United StatesAmericas 3 (1932, 1984, 2028)
Innsbruck AustriaEurope 2 (1964, 1976) 1 (2012)
5 Athens Greece 2 (1896, 2004) 2
Tokyo JapanAsia 2 (1964, 2020)
Beijing China 1 (2008) 1 (2022)
St. Moritz  SwitzerlandEurope 2 (1928, 1948)
Lake Placid United StatesAmericas 2 (1932, 1980)
Lillehammer NorwayEurope 1 (1994) 1 (2016)
Cortina d'Ampezzo Italy 2 (1956, 2026)
Pyeongchang, Gangwon South KoreaAsia 1 (2018) 1 (2024)
  • The 1906 Intercalated Games are no longer officially recognized by the IOC as an official Olympic Games.

Number of Olympic Games by country

Nations that have hosted or will host the Summer Olympics
  5 times
  4 times (no entry)
  3 times
  2 times
  1 time
  Never held games
Nations that have hosted or will host the Winter Olympics
  4 times
  3 times
  2 times
  1 time
  Never held games
List of countries ranked by the number of times they hosted the Olympic Games
Rank First
Year
Last
Year
Country Continent Summer
Olympics
Winter
Olympics
Summer
Youth Olympics
Winter
Youth Olympics
Total
1 19042028  United StatesAmericas 5 (1904, 1932, 1984, 1996, 2028) 4 (1932, 1960, 1980, 2002) 9
2 19002024  FranceEurope 3 (1900, 1924, 2024) 3 (1924, 1968, 1992) 6
3 19562026  Italy 1 (1960) 3 (1944, 1956, 2006, 2026) 4
19642020  JapanAsia 2 (1940, 1964, 2020) 2 (1940, 1972, 1998)
5 19082012  United KingdomEurope 3 (1908, 1944, 1948, 2012) 3
19282020   Switzerland 2 (1928, 1940, 1948) 1 (2020)
19361972  Germany 2 (1916, 1936, 1972) 1 (1936, 1940)
19522016  Norway 2 (1952, 1994) 1 (2016)
19642012  Austria 2 (1964, 1976) 1 (2012)
19762010  CanadaAmericas 1 (1976) 2 (1988, 2010)
19882024  South KoreaAsia 1 (1988) 1 (2018) 1 (2024)
20082022  ChinaAsia 1 (2008) 1 (2022) 1 (2014)
13 18962004  GreeceEurope 2 (1896, 2004) 2
19562000  AustraliaAustralia 2 (1956, 2000)
19802014  Russia[lower-alpha 8]Europe[lower-alpha 8] 1 (1980) 1 (2014)
16 19121912  SwedenEurope 1 (1912) 1
19201920  Belgium 1 (1920)
19281928  Netherlands 1 (1928)
19521952  Finland 1 (1940, 1952)
19681968  MexicoAmericas 1 (1968)
19841984  YugoslaviaEurope 1 (1984)
19921992  Spain 1 (1992)
20102010  SingaporeAsia 1 (2010)
20162016  BrazilAmericas 1 (2016)
20182018  Argentina 1 (2018)
20262026  SenegalAfrica 1 (2026)

Number of Olympic Games by continent

Rank
First
year
Last
year
Continent
Summer
Olympics
Winter
Olympics
Summer
Youth Olympics
Winter
Youth Olympics
Total
1 18962026 Europe 17 (1896, 1900, 1908, 1912, 1916, 1920, 1924, 1928, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1960, 1972, 1980[lower-alpha 8], 1992, 2004, 2012, 2024) 15 (1924, 1928, 1936, 1940, 1944, 1948, 1952, 1956, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1984, 1992, 1994, 2006, 2014[lower-alpha 8], 2026) 03 (2012, 2016, 2020) 35
2 19042028 Americas 08 (1904, 1932, 1968, 1976, 1984, 1996, 2016, 2028) 06 (1932, 1960, 1980, 1988, 2002, 2010) 01 (2018) 15
3 19642024 Asia 04 (1940, 1964, 1988, 2008, 2020) 04 (1940, 1972, 1998, 2018, 2022) 02 (2010, 2014) 01 (2024) 11
4 19562000 Australia 02 (1956, 2000) 2
5 20262026 Africa 01 (2026) 1

Notes

  1. Originally awarded to Chicago, but moved to St. Louis to coincide with the World's Fair.[8][9]
  2. The 1908 Olympics were originally given to Rome, but were moved to London when Mount Vesuvius erupted.[10]
  3. The sailing events in 1920 were held in Ostend, Belgium and in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
  4. The 1940 Winter Olympics were originally awarded to Sapporo, Japan, but the launch of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937 caused them to be relocated to Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Nazi Germany, before being cancelled in 1939 because of the expansion of World War II.
  5. The 1940 Summer Olympics were originally awarded to Tokyo, Japan, but the launch of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937 caused them to be relocated Helsinki, Finland, before being cancelled in 1939 because of the expansion of World War II.
  6. Equestrian events were held in Stockholm, Sweden. Stockholm had to bid for the equestrian competition separately; it received its own Olympic flame and had its own formal invitations and opening and closing ceremonies, just like the regular Summer Olympics.[21]
  7. The 1976 Winter Olympics were originally awarded to Denver, Colorado, United States in 1970, but in 1972, after a referendum, Denver voluntarily gave up its right, citing environmental concerns for the Colorado area. The IOC eventually decided to relocate those games to Innsbruck, Austria.
  8. Russia (like the former Soviet Union) spans the continents of Europe and Asia. However, the Russian Olympic Committee is part of the European Olympic Committees and has its official seat in Moscow (this was also the case for the former Soviet Olympic Committee). Also, Moscow is on the European side of the most commonly recognized boundary between Europe and Asia. (Sochi is in Asia per the usual geographic boundary, being just south of the Greater Caucasus' western end; but political approximations of the continental boundary place it in Europe.)
  9. Equestrian events were held in China's Hong Kong SAR.[22] Although Hong Kong's separate NOC conducted the equestrian competition, it was an integral part of the Beijing Games (unlike the 1956 Stockholm equestrian competition it was not conducted under a separate Hong Kong bid, separate flame, etc.).[23]
  10. The 2020 Summer Olympics were originally scheduled for 24 July to 9 August 2020, but were rescheduled to 2021 by 12 months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the event is still referred to as the 2020 Summer Olympics to preserve the 4-year Olympiad cycle.

References

  1. Findling, John E.; Pelle, Kimberly D. (2004). Encyclopedia of the Modern Olympic Movement. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 41. ISBN 978-0-313-32278-5.
  2. Karl Lennartz. "The 2nd International Olympic Games In Athens 1906" (PDF). Journal of Olympic History (Dec. 2001–Jan. 2002). Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  3. "IOC, IPC, Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee and Tokyo Metropolitan Government Announce New Dates for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020". olympic.org. 2020-03-30. Archived from the original on 30 March 2020. Retrieved 2020-03-30.
  4. "Tokyo 2020: Olympic Games organisers 'agree postponement'". BBC Sport. 24 March 2020. Archived from the original on 24 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  5. "FIS in favor of Youth Olympic Games". FIS. 8 May 2007. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 20 May 2007.
  6. Group, Taylor Francis (2003). The Europa World Yearbook. Taylor and Francis Group. p. 247. ISBN 978-1-85743-227-5.
  7. "Choice of the Host City". olympic.org. International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 2009-06-04.
  8. "St Louis 1904". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 29 July 2008.
  9. "St. Louis gets Olympic Games; International Committee Sanctions the Change for the World's Fair in 1904" (PDF). The New York Times (12 February 1903). Retrieved 29 July 2008.
  10. "Rome Games moved to London". realclearsports.com. 2008. Archived from the original on 9 May 2015. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  11. Durántez, Conrado (April–May 1997). "The Olympic Movement, a twentieth-century phenomenon" (PDF). Olympic Review. XXVI (14): 56–57.
  12. "Antwerp 1920". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  13. "Chamonix 1924". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  14. "Paris 1924". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  15. "St. Moritz 1928". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  16. "Amsterdam 1928". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  17. "Lake Placid 1932". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  18. "Los Angeles 1932". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  19. "Garmisch-Partenkirchen 1936". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  20. "Berlin 1936". olympic.org. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  21. "Stockholm/Melbourne 1956". Swedish Olympic Committee. Archived from the original on 9 October 2008. Retrieved 1 August 2008.
  22. Tim Pile. "Hong Kong saddles up for the Olympics". The Daily Telegraph (25 June 2008). London. Retrieved 29 July 2008.
  23. "2008 Beijing Olympic home page". International Olympic Committee. Retrieved 4 May 2008.
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