List of Australian Open men's singles champions

The Australian Open[lower-alpha 1][lower-alpha 2] is an annual tennis tournament created in 1905 and played on outdoor hardcourts[lower-alpha 3][lower-alpha 4] at Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia.[7] The Australian Open is played over a two-week period beginning in mid-January and has been chronologically the first of the four Grand Slam tournaments each year since 1987. The event was not held from 1916 to 1918 because of World War I, from 1941 to 1945 because of World War II and in 1986.[2][8] The timing of the Australian Open has changed several times. In 1977, the date of the final moved from January to December, which resulted in having two Australian Opens in 1977; there was a January edition and a December edition that year.[9] The originally planned December 1986 edition was moved forward to January 1987, resulting in no Australian Open in 1986.[10][11] The Australian Open was an Open Era event for the first time in 1969. One year previously in 1968 the French Open, Wimbledon and the US Open were Open Era events for the first time.

Australian Open Men's Singles Champions
LocationMelbourne
Australia
VenueMelbourne Park
Governing bodyTennis Australia
Created1905 (established)
Editions108 (2020)
Open Era: 1969 (53 editions)
SurfaceGrass (1905–1987)
Hard (1988–present)
Rebound Ace (1988–2007)
Plexicushion (2008–2019)
GreenSet (2020–present)
Prize moneyA$ 2,300,000 (2012)[1]
TrophyNorman Brookes Challenge Cup
Websiteaustralianopen.com
Most titles
Amateur era6: Roy Emerson
Open era9: Novak Djokovic
Most consecutive titles
Amateur era5: Roy Emerson
Open era3: Novak Djokovic
Current champion
Novak Djokovic
(Ninth title)

History

Christchurch and Hastings, New Zealand, and Perth, Brisbane, Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, have hosted the men's singles event. The event switched cities every year before it settled in 1972 in Melbourne. The event was held at the Kooyong Stadium before moving to Melbourne Park in 1988.[2]

The Australian Open court surface changed once, from grass courts to hardcourts in 1988.[2][4][5] Mats Wilander was the only player to win the event on both surfaces; twice on grass and once on hardcourt.

The men's singles rules have undergone several changes since the first edition. This event has always been contested in a knockout format, and all matches have been best-of-five sets except in 1970, 1973, and 1974, when the first round was best-of-three sets, and in 1982, when the third and fourth round were best-of-three sets.[7] Since 1905, all sets have been decided in the advantage format. The lingering death best-of-twelve points tie-break was introduced in 1971 and has been used for the first four sets since then, except from 1980 to 1982, when the tie-break was also played in fifth sets.[7][12]

The champion receives a miniature replica of the silver-gilt Norman Brookes Challenge Cup, named after the 1911 champion and former Lawn Tennis Association of Australia (LTAA) president, and modeled after the Warwick Vase.[13]

In the Australasian Championships, James Anderson holds the records for most titles with three (1922, 1924–1925), and the most consecutive titles with two (1924–1925). In the Australian Championships, Roy Emerson holds the records for most titles with six (1961, 1963–1967) and most consecutive titles with five (1963–1967).[8] The inclusion of professional tennis players in 1969 marked the competition's entry into the Open Era, in which Novak Djokovic (2008, 2011–2013, 2015–2016, 2019–2021) holds the record for most titles with nine. The Open Era record for most consecutive titles is three by Djokovic (2011–2013 and 2019–2021).[8] This event was won without losing a set during the Open Era by Rosewall in 1971 and Federer in 2007.

Champions

Australasian Championships

James Anderson won three titles in the Australasian Championships.
Jack Crawford titled in 1931, 1932, 1933 and 1935.
Ken Rosewall, four-time Australian Open champion.
Roy Emerson captured six titles in the Australian Championships.
Year[lower-alpha 5] Country Champion Country Runner-up Score in the final[8][14]
1905 AUSRodney Heath AUSAlbert Curtis4–6, 6–3, 6–4, 6–4
1906 NZLAnthony Wilding NZLFrancis Fisher6–0, 6–4, 6–4
1907 AUSHorace Rice NZLHarry Parker6–3, 6–4, 6–4
1908 USAFred Alexander AUSAlfred Dunlop3–6, 3–6, 6–0, 6–2, 6–3
1909 NZLAnthony Wilding AUSErnie Parker6–1, 7–5, 6–2
1910 AUSRodney Heath AUSHorace Rice6–4, 6–3, 6–2
1911 AUSNorman Brookes AUSHorace Rice6–1, 6–2, 6–3
1912 BRI[lower-alpha 5]James Cecil Parke BRIAlfred Beamish3–6, 6–3, 1–6, 6–1, 7–5
1913 AUSErnie Parker NZLHarry Parker2–6, 6–1, 6–3, 6–2
1914 AUSArthur O'Hara Wood AUSGerald Patterson6–4, 6–3, 5–7, 6–1
1915 BRIGordon Lowe AUSHorace Rice4–6, 6–1, 6–1, 6–4
1916No competition (due to World War I)
1917
1918
1919 BRIAlgernon Kingscote AUSEric Pockley6–4, 6–0, 6–3
1920 AUSPat O'Hara Wood AUSRonald Thomas6–3, 4–6, 6–8, 6–1, 6–3
1921 AUSRhys Gemmell AUSAlf Hedeman7–5, 6–1, 6–4
1922 AUSJames Anderson AUSGerald Patterson6–0, 3–6, 3–6, 6–3, 6–2
1923 AUSPat O'Hara Wood AUSBert St. John6–1, 6–1, 6–3
1924 AUSJames Anderson AUSRichard Schlesinger6–3, 6–4, 3–6, 5–7, 6–3
1925 AUSJames Anderson AUSGerald Patterson11–9, 2–6, 6–2, 6–3
1926 AUSJohn Hawkes AUSJames Willard6–1, 6–3, 6–1
Australian Championships
1927 AUSGerald Patterson AUSJohn Hawkes3–6, 6–4, 3–6, 18–16, 6–3
1928 FRAJean Borotra AUSJack Cummings6–4, 6–1, 4–6, 5–7, 6–3
1929 GBRJohn Colin Gregory AUSRichard Schlesinger6–2, 6–2, 5–7, 7–5
1930 AUSEdgar Moon AUSHarry Hopman6–3, 6–1, 6–3
1931 AUSJack Crawford AUSHarry Hopman6–4, 6–2, 2–6, 6–1
1932 AUSJack Crawford AUSHarry Hopman4–6, 6–3, 3–6, 6–3, 6–1
1933 AUSJack Crawford USAKeith Gledhill2–6, 7–5, 6–3, 6–2
1934 GBRFred Perry AUSJack Crawford6–3, 7–5, 6–1
1935 AUSJack Crawford GBRFred Perry2–6, 6–4, 6–4, 6–4
1936 AUSAdrian Quist AUSJack Crawford6–2, 6–3, 4–6, 3–6, 9–7
1937 AUSVivian McGrath AUSJohn Bromwich6–3, 1–6, 6–0, 2–6, 6–1
1938 USADon Budge AUSJohn Bromwich6–4, 6–2, 6–1
1939 AUSJohn Bromwich AUSAdrian Quist6–4, 6–1, 6–3
1940 AUSAdrian Quist AUSJack Crawford6–3, 6–1, 6–2
1941No competition (due to World War II)[lower-alpha 6]
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946 AUSJohn Bromwich AUSDinny Pails5–7, 6–3, 7–5, 3–6, 6–2
1947 AUSDinny Pails AUSJohn Bromwich4–6, 6–4, 3–6, 7–5, 8–6
1948 AUSAdrian Quist AUSJohn Bromwich6–4, 3–6, 6–3, 2–6, 6–3
1949 AUSFrank Sedgman AUSJohn Bromwich6–3, 6–2, 6–2
1950 AUSFrank Sedgman AUSKen McGregor6–3, 6–4, 4–6, 6–1
1951 USADick Savitt AUSKen McGregor6–3, 2–6, 6–3, 6–1
1952 AUSKen McGregor AUSFrank Sedgman7–5, 12–10, 2–6, 6–2
1953 AUSKen Rosewall AUSMervyn Rose6–0, 6–3, 6–4
1954 AUSMervyn Rose AUSRex Hartwig6–2, 0–6, 6–4, 6–2
1955 AUSKen Rosewall AUSLew Hoad9–7, 6–4, 6–4
1956 AUSLew Hoad AUSKen Rosewall6–4, 3–6, 6–4, 7–5
1957 AUSAshley Cooper AUSNeale Fraser6–3, 9–11, 6–4, 6–2
1958 AUSAshley Cooper AUSMalcolm Anderson7–5, 6–3, 6–4
1959 USAAlex Olmedo[lower-alpha 7] AUSNeale Fraser6–1, 6–2, 3–6, 6–3
1960 AUSRod Laver AUSNeale Fraser5–7, 3–6, 6–3, 8–6, 8–6
1961 AUSRoy Emerson AUSRod Laver1–6, 6–3, 7–5, 6–4
1962 AUSRod Laver AUSRoy Emerson8–6, 0–6, 6–4, 6–4
1963 AUSRoy Emerson AUSKen Fletcher6–3, 6–3, 6–1
1964 AUSRoy Emerson AUSFred Stolle6–3, 6–4, 6–2
1965 AUSRoy Emerson AUSFred Stolle7–9, 2–6, 6–4, 7–5, 6–1
1966 AUSRoy Emerson USAArthur Ashe6–4, 6–8, 6–2, 6–3
1967 AUSRoy Emerson USAArthur Ashe6–4, 6–1, 6–4
1968 AUSWilliam Bowrey ESPJuan Gisbert7–5, 2–6, 9–7, 6–4

Australian Open

Andre Agassi won 4 singles titles in Australia.
Roger Federer won 6 singles titles at the event.
Novak Djokovic holds the all-time Australian Open record with 9 titles.
Year[lower-alpha 5] Country Champion Country Runner-up Score in the final[8][14]
1969 AUSRod Laver[lower-alpha 2] ESPAndrés Gimeno6–3, 6–4, 7–5
1970 USAArthur Ashe AUSDick Crealy6–4, 9–7, 6–2
1971 AUSKen Rosewall USAArthur Ashe6–1, 7–5, 6–3
1972 AUSKen Rosewall AUSMalcolm Anderson7–6(7–2), 6–3, 7–5
1973 AUSJohn Newcombe NZLOnny Parun6–3, 6–7, 7–5, 6–1
1974 USAJimmy Connors AUSPhil Dent7–6(9–7), 6–4, 4–6, 6–3
1975 AUSJohn Newcombe USAJimmy Connors7–5, 3–6, 6–4, 7–6(9–7)
1976 AUSMark Edmondson AUSJohn Newcombe6–7, 6–3, 7–6, 6–1
1977 (1)[lower-alpha 8] USARoscoe Tanner ARGGuillermo Vilas6–3, 6–3, 6–3
1977 (2)[lower-alpha 8] USAVitas Gerulaitis GBRJohn Lloyd6–3, 7–6(7–1), 5–7, 3–6, 6–2
1978 ARGGuillermo Vilas AUSJohn Marks6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
1979 ARGGuillermo Vilas USAJohn Sadri7–6(7–4), 6–3, 6–2
1980 USABrian Teacher AUSKim Warwick7–5, 7–6(7–4), 6–2
1981 RSAJohan Kriek USASteve Denton6–2, 7–6(7–1), 6–7(1–7), 6–4
1982 USA[lower-alpha 9]Johan Kriek USASteve Denton6–3, 6–3, 6–2
1983 SWEMats Wilander TCHIvan Lendl6–1, 6–4, 6–4
1984 SWEMats Wilander RSAKevin Curren6–7(5–7), 6–4, 7–6(7–3), 6–2
1985 SWEStefan Edberg SWEMats Wilander6–4, 6–3, 6–3
1986No competition (due to date change)[lower-alpha 10]
1987 SWEStefan Edberg AUSPat Cash6–3, 6–4, 3–6, 5–7, 6–3
1988 SWEMats Wilander AUSPat Cash6–3, 6–7(3–7), 3–6, 6–1, 8–6
1989 TCHIvan Lendl TCHMiloslav Mečíř6–2, 6–2, 6–2
1990 TCHIvan Lendl SWEStefan Edberg4–6, 7–6(7–3), 5–2 retired[lower-alpha 11]
1991 GERBoris Becker TCHIvan Lendl1–6, 6–4, 6–4, 6–4
1992 USAJim Courier SWEStefan Edberg6–3, 3–6, 6–4, 6–2
1993 USAJim Courier SWEStefan Edberg6–2, 6–1, 2–6, 7–5
1994 USAPete Sampras USATodd Martin7–6(7–4), 6–4, 6–4
1995 USAAndre Agassi USAPete Sampras4–6, 6–1, 7–6(8–6), 6–4
1996 GERBoris Becker USAMichael Chang6–2, 6–4, 2–6, 6–2
1997 USAPete Sampras ESPCarlos Moyá6–2, 6–3, 6–3
1998 CZEPetr Korda CHIMarcelo Ríos6–2, 6–2, 6–2
1999 RUSYevgeny Kafelnikov SWEThomas Enqvist4–6, 6–0, 6–3, 7–6(7–1)
2000 USAAndre Agassi RUSYevgeny Kafelnikov3–6, 6–3, 6–2, 6–4
2001 USAAndre Agassi FRAArnaud Clément6–4, 6–2, 6–2
2002 SWEThomas Johansson RUSMarat Safin3–6, 6–4, 6–4, 7–6(7–4)
2003 USAAndre Agassi GERRainer Schüttler6–2, 6–2, 6–1
2004  SUIRoger Federer RUSMarat Safin7–6(7–3), 6–4, 6–2
2005 RUSMarat Safin AUSLleyton Hewitt1–6, 6–3, 6–4, 6–4
2006  SUIRoger Federer CYPMarcos Baghdatis5–7, 7–5, 6–0, 6–2
2007  SUIRoger Federer CHIFernando González7–6(7–2), 6–4, 6–4
2008 SRBNovak Djokovic FRAJo-Wilfried Tsonga4–6, 6–4, 6–3, 7–6(7–2)
2009 ESPRafael Nadal  SUIRoger Federer7–5, 3–6, 7–6(7–3), 3–6, 6–2
2010  SUIRoger Federer GBRAndy Murray6–3, 6–4, 7–6(13–11)
2011 SRBNovak Djokovic GBRAndy Murray6–4, 6–2, 6–3
2012 SRBNovak Djokovic ESPRafael Nadal5–7, 6–4, 6–2, 6–7(5–7), 7–5
2013 SRBNovak Djokovic GBRAndy Murray6–7(2–7), 7–6(7–3), 6–3, 6–2
2014  SUIStan Wawrinka ESPRafael Nadal6–3, 6–2, 3–6, 6–3
2015 SRBNovak Djokovic GBRAndy Murray7–6(7–5), 6–7(4–7), 6–3, 6–0
2016 SRBNovak Djokovic GBRAndy Murray6–1, 7–5, 7–6(7–3)
2017  SUIRoger Federer ESPRafael Nadal6–4, 3–6, 6–1, 3–6, 6–3
2018  SUIRoger Federer CROMarin Čilić6–2, 6–7(5–7), 6–3, 3–6, 6–1
2019 SRBNovak Djokovic ESPRafael Nadal6–3, 6–2, 6–3
2020 SRBNovak Djokovic AUTDominic Thiem6–4, 4–6, 2–6, 6–3, 6–4
2021 SRBNovak Djokovic RUSDaniil Medvedev7–5, 6–2, 6–2

Statistics

Multiple champions

Player Amateur Era Open Era All-time Years
 Novak Djokovic (SRB)0992008, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2019, 2020, 2021
 Roy Emerson (AUS)6061961, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967
 Roger Federer (SUI)0662004, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2017, 2018
 Jack Crawford (AUS)4041931, 1932, 1933, 1935
 Ken Rosewall (AUS)2241953, 1955, 1971, 1972
 Andre Agassi (USA)0441995, 2000, 2001, 2003
 James Anderson (AUS)3031922, 1924, 1925
 Adrian Quist (AUS)3031936, 1940, 1948
 Rod Laver (AUS)2131960, 1962, 1969
 Mats Wilander (SWE)0331983, 1984, 1988
 Boris Becker (GER)0221991, 1996
 John Bromwich (AUS)2021939, 1946
 Ashley Cooper (AUS)2021957, 1958
 Jim Courier (USA)0221992, 1993
 Stefan Edberg (SWE)0221985, 1987
 Rodney Heath (AUS)2021905, 1910
  Johan Kriek (RSA) (USA)[lower-alpha 9]0221981, 1982
 Ivan Lendl (TCH)0221989, 1990
 John Newcombe (AUS)0221973, 1975
 Pete Sampras (USA)0221994, 1997
 Frank Sedgman (AUS)2021949, 1950
 Guillermo Vilas (ARG)0221978, 1979
 Anthony Wilding (NZL)2021906, 1909
 Pat O'Hara Wood (AUS)2021920, 1923

Champions by country

Country Amateur Era Open Era All-time First title Last title
 Australia (AUS) 44 6 50 1905 1976
 United States (USA) 4 14 18 1908 2003
 Serbia (SRB) 0 9 9 2008 2021
  Switzerland (SUI) 0 7 7 2004 2018
 Sweden (SWE) 0 6 6 1983 2002
 United Kingdom (GBR)[lower-alpha 12] 5 0 5 1912 1934
 Argentina (ARG) 0 2 2 1978 1979
 Czechoslovakia (TCH)[lower-alpha 13] 0 2 2 1989 1990
 Germany (GER) 0 2 2 1991 1996
 New Zealand (NZL) 2 0 2 1906 1909
 Russia (RUS) 0 2 2 1999 2005
 South Africa (RSA) 0 1 1 1981 1981
 Czech Republic (CZE)[lower-alpha 14] 0 1 1 1998 1998
 France (FRA) 1 0 1 1928 1928
 Spain (ESP) 0 1 1 2009 2009

See also

Australian Open other competitions

  • List of Australian Open women's singles champions
  • List of Australian Open men's doubles champions
  • List of Australian Open women's doubles champions
  • List of Australian Open mixed doubles champions

Grand Slam men's singles

Notes

  1. Known as the Australasian Championships (19051926) and as the Australian Championships (19271968) during the Amateur Era.[2]
  2. The tournament entered the Open Era with the 1969 edition, allowing professional players to compete alongside amateurs.[2]
  3. Since 1988, Rod Laver Arena features a retractable roof and lights, allowing indoor and night-time play.[3]
  4. The Australian Open specifically uses Plexicushion Prestige hardcourts, categorized as a "Medium" speed surface by the International Tennis Federation (ITF).[4][5][6]
  5. Each year is linked to an article about that particular event's draw.
  6. The tournament was not held from 1941 to 1945 because of World War II.[8]
  7. Although he competed for the US in Davis Cup, Alex Olmedo was still a Peruvian citizen.[15][16]
  8. Two Australian Opens were in held in 1977 because of a date change, the first in January and the second in December.[9]
  9. Johan Kriek won his first title as a South African, but the next year won as a citizen of the United States.
  10. The tournament was not held in 1986 because of a date change. See 1986 Australian Open tournament.[10][11]
  11. Ivan Lendl won the final after Stefan Edberg was forced to retire due to a pulled abdominal muscle.[17]
  12. Three wins by players from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (18011922), plus two wins by players from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (1922present).
  13. Czechoslovakia (TCH, 19181992), does not include the totals of Czech Republic (CZE, 1993present) and Slovakia (SVK, 1993present).
  14. Czech Republic (CZE, 1993present), does not include the totals of Czechoslovakia (TCH, 19181992), or Slovakia (SVK, 1993present).

References

General

  • "Grand Slam Tournaments – Australian Open" (PDF). usta.com. United States Tennis Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 July 2013. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  • "List of Australian Open men's champions". ESPN. Reuters. 1 February 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.

Specific

  1. "2012 Australian Open". Event Guide: Prize Money. Tennis Australia. Archived from the original on 29 December 2010. Retrieved 29 January 2012.
  2. Foenander, Tristan. "History of the Australian Open – the Grand Slam of Asia/Pacific". australianopen.com. IBM, Tennis Australia. Archived from the original on 25 May 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  3. "Rod Laver Arena". mopt.com.au. Melbourne & Olympic Parks. Archived from the original on 13 September 2009. Retrieved 2 August 2009.
  4. Schlink, Leo (14 January 2008). "Plexicushion replaces Rebound Ace at Australian Open". Herald Sun. The Herald and Weekly Times. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  5. Bevan, Chris (11 January 2008). "On-court blues for Aussie tennis?". BBC Sport. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  6. "List of Classified Court Surfaces". itftennis.com. ITF Licensing. Retrieved 1 August 2009.
  7. "Tournament profile – Australian Open". atpworldtour.com. ATP Tour, Inc. Retrieved 5 July 2009.
  8. "Grand Slam Tournaments – Australian Open" (PDF). usta.com. United States Tennis Association. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 May 2011. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  9. "1977 Grand Slam calendar". atpworldtour.com. ATP Tour, Inc. Archived from the original on 10 July 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  10. "1986 Grand Slam calendar". atpworldtour.com. ATP Tour, Inc. Archived from the original on 10 July 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  11. "Australian Open – History – Year-by-year". australianopen.com. IBM, Tennis Australia. Archived from the original on 3 August 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  12. "Roddick survives 83-game epic". The Guardian. London. 22 January 2003. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  13. Vaughan, Gerard (17 January 2005). "Trophy has roots in an 18th-century antiquity". The Age. The Age Company Ltd. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  14. "Men's Singles". australianopen.com. IBM. Archived from the original on 15 January 2010. Retrieved 3 December 2009.
  15. "Aching, Victorious Olmedo to Forsake Tennis for Study". Chicago Tribune. Tribune Interactive, Inc. 27 January 1959. Retrieved 2 August 2009.
  16. "List of Australian Open men's champions". ESPN. Reuters. 1 February 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2009.
  17. Bick, Nina (29 January 1990). "Lendl Wins Title as Edberg Pulls Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2 August 2009.

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.