Hauts-de-France

Hauts-de-France (French pronunciation: [o də fʁɑ̃s] (listen); Picard: Heuts-d'Franche; lit.'Heights of France') is the northernmost region of France, created by the territorial reform of French regions in 2014, from a merger of Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardy. Its prefecture is Lille. The new region came into existence on 1 January 2016, after regional elections in December 2015.[1] The Conseil d'État approved Hauts-de-France as the name of the region on 28 September 2016, effective the following 30 September.[2][3]

Hauts-de-France
Quai Belu in Amiens
Flag
Coat of arms
Country France
PrefectureLille
Departments
5
Government
  President of the Regional CouncilXavier Bertrand (DVD)
Area
  Total31,813 km2 (12,283 sq mi)
Area rank9th
Population
 (2015 est.)
  Total6,009,976
  Density190/km2 (490/sq mi)
Demonym(s)none
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 codeFR-HDF
GDP (PPP) (2016)Ranked 5th
(13th per capita)
Total€176 billion (US$195 billion)
Per capita€29,215 (US$32,363)
NUTS RegionFRE
Websitewww.regionhautsdefrance.fr

With 6,009,976 inhabitants (as of 1 January 2015) and a population density of 189 inhabitants/km2, it is the third most populous region in France and the second most densely populated in metropolitan France after its southern neighbour Île-de-France. It is bordered by Belgium to the north.

Toponymy

The region's interim name Nord-Pas-de-Calais-Picardie was a hyphenated placename, created by hyphenating the merged regions' names—Nord-Pas-de-Calais and Picardie—in alphabetical order.[4]

On 14 March 2016, well ahead of the 1 July deadline, the regional council decided on Hauts-de-France as the region's permanent name.[2][4] The provisional name of the region was retired on 30 September 2016, when the new name of the region, Hauts-de-France, took effect.[3]

Geography

The region covers an area of more than 31,813 km2 (12,283 sq mi). It borders Belgium (Flanders and Wallonia) to the northeast, the North Sea to the north, the English Channel to the west, as well as the French regions of Grand Est to the east-southeast, Île-de-France to the south, and Normandy to the west-southwest. It is connected to the United Kingdom (England) via the Channel Tunnel.

Map of the new region with its five départements, coloured according to the historical provinces as they existed until 1790.
  Picardy
  Artois
  French Flanders
  French Hainaut
  Cambrésis
  Champagne

Departments

Hauts-de-France comprises five departments: Aisne, Nord, Oise, Pas-de-Calais, and Somme.

Major communities

  1. Lille (227,560; region prefecture; surrounding area is home to over 1.5 million inhabitants)
  2. Amiens (133,448)
  3. Roubaix (94,713)
  4. Tourcoing (91,923)
  5. Dunkirk (90,995)
  6. Calais (72,589)
  7. Villeneuve-d'Ascq (62,308)
  8. Saint-Quentin (55,978)
  9. Beauvais (54,289)
  10. Valenciennes (42,691)

Economy

The Gross domestic product (GDP) of the region was 161.7 billion euros in 2018, accounting for 6.9% of French economic output. GDP per capita adjusted for purchasing power was 24,200 euros or 80% of the EU27 average in the same year. The GDP per employee was 101% of the EU average.[5]

French sartorial heritage

The region was a pivotal centre of mulquinerie.

See also

References

This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.