Harvard Business School

Harvard Business School (HBS) is the graduate business school of Harvard University in Boston, Massachusetts. It is consistently ranked among the top business schools in the world[2][3] and offers a large full-time MBA program, management-related doctoral programs, and many executive education programs. It owns Harvard Business Publishing, which publishes business books, leadership articles, case studies, and the monthly Harvard Business Review. It is also home to the Baker Library/Bloomberg Center.

Harvard Business School
Coat of arms
TypePrivate
Established1908
Endowment$3.5 billion (2017)[1]
DeanSrikant Datar
Academic staff
233 (2017)[1]
Administrative staff
1,680 (2017)[1]
Students2,011 (1,879 MBA)[1]
Location, ,
United States

42°22′02″N 71°07′21″W
CampusUrban
Websitewww.hbs.edu

History

Baker Library

The school was established in 1908.[4] Initially established by the humanities faculty, it received independent status in 1910, and became a separate administrative unit in 1913. The first dean was historian Edwin Francis Gay (1867–1946).[5] Yogev (2001) explains the original concept:

This school of business and public administration was originally conceived as a school for diplomacy and government service on the model of the French Ecole des Sciences Politiques.[6] The goal was an institution of higher learning that would offer a Master of Arts degree in the humanities field, with a major in business. In discussions about the curriculum, the suggestion was made to concentrate on specific business topics such as banking, railroads, and so on... Professor Lowell said the school would train qualified public administrators whom the government would have no choice but to employ, thereby building a better public administration... Harvard was blazing a new trail by educating young people for a career in business, just as its medical school trained doctors and its law faculty trained lawyers.[7]

The business school pioneered the development of the case method of teaching, drawing inspiration from this approach to legal education at Harvard. Cases are typically descriptions of real events in organizations. Students are positioned as managers and are presented with problems which they need to analyze and provide recommendations on.[8]

From the start the school enjoyed a close relationship with the corporate world. Within a few years of its founding many business leaders were its alumni and were hiring other alumni for starting positions in their firms.[9][10][11]

At its founding, the school accepted only male students. The Training Course in Personnel Administration, founded at Radcliffe College in 1937, was the beginning of business training for women at Harvard. HBS took over administration of that program from Radcliffe in 1954. In 1959, alumnae of the one-year program (by then known as the Harvard-Radcliffe Program in Business Administration) were permitted to apply to join the HBS MBA program as second-years. In December 1962, the faculty voted to allow women to enter the MBA program directly. The first women to apply directly to the MBA program matriculated in September 1963.[12]

In 2012–2013, HBS administration implemented new programs and practices to improve the experience of female students and recruit more female professors.[13]

International research centers

HBS established nine global research centers and four regional offices[14] and functions through offices in Asia Pacific (Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore), United States (San Francisco Bay Area, CA), Europe (Paris), South Asia (India),[15] Middle East and North Africa (Dubai, Istanbul, Tel Aviv), Japan and Latin America (Buenos Aires, Mexico City, São Paulo).

MBA program

Inside an HBS classroom
HBS participates in the Harvard Graduate Council (HGC), a university-wide student government

Rankings

Business school rankings
Worldwide overall
QS[16]4 [17]
Times Higher Education[18]5 [19]
U.S. News & World Report[20]1
Worldwide MBA
Business Insider[21]3
Economist[22]2
Financial Times[23]1
U.S. MBA
Bloomberg Businessweek[24]3
Forbes[25]4
U.S. News & World Report[26]5 [27]
Vault[28]2

HBS is ranked 5th in the nation by U.S. News & World Report[29] and 1st in the world by the Financial Times.[30]

Student life

HBS students can join more than 80 different clubs and student organizations on campus. The Student Association (SA) is the main interface between the MBA student body and the faculty/administration. In addition, HBS student body is represented at the university-level by the Harvard Graduate Council.

Other programs

In 2015, executive education contributed $168 million to HBS's total revenue of $707 million.[31]

Advanced Management Program (AMP)

The Advanced Management Program (AMP) is a seven-week residential program for senior executives with the stated aim to "Prepare for the Highest Level of Leadership".[32] After HBS suspended its MBA program from 1943 to 1946[33] to train the military leadership in its six wartime schools,[34] AMP emerge in 1945 out of the Army Air Forces Statistical School[35] as HBS's civilian senior leadership program.[36] Today, AMP is held twice a year, each session consisting of about 170 senior executives.[32] In contrast to the MBA program, AMP has no formal educational prerequisites.[31] Admission to AMP is selective and based on an applicant's track record as senior executive and references.[37][32] Upon completion, AMP participants are inducted into the HBS alumni community.[31]

Owner/President Management Program (OPM)

The Owner/President Management Program (OPM) consists of three three-week "units", spread over two years, marketed to "business owners and entrepreneurs".[38][39] There are "no formal educational requirements". Notable attendees include model-turned-businesswoman Tyra Banks, who has been criticised for using phrases such as "I went to business school", from which people might infer that she earned a Harvard MBA.[40]

Harvard Business School Online (HBS Online)

HBS Online, previously HBX, is an online learning initiative announced by the Harvard Business School in March 2014 to host online university-level courses. Initial programs are the Credential of Readiness (CORe) and Disruptive Strategy with Clayton Christensen. Leading with Finance, taught by Mihir A. Desai, was added to the catalog in August 2016. HBS Online also created HBX Live, a virtual classroom based at WGBH in Boston. The duration of HBS Standard Online CORe course is 10 to 12 weeks.[41]

Summer Venture in Management Program (SVMP)

The Summer Venture in Management Program (SVMP) is a one-week management training program for rising college seniors designed to increase diversity and opportunity in business education. Participants must be employed in a summer internship and be nominated by and have sponsorship from their organization to attend.[42]

Academic units

The school's faculty are divided into 10 academic units: Accounting and Management; Business, Government and the International Economy; Entrepreneurial Management; Finance; General Management; Marketing; Negotiation, Organizations & Markets; Organizational Behavior; Strategy; and Technology and Operations Management.[43]

Buildings

Older buildings include the 1927-built Morgan Hall, named for J.P. Morgan, and 1940-built Loeb house, named for John L. Loeb Sr. and his son, (both designed by McKim, Mead & White[44][45]), and the 1971-built Burden Hall with a 900-seat auditorium.[46][47]

In the fall of 2010, Tata related companies and charities donated $50 million for the construction of an executive center.[48] The executive center was named as Tata Hall, after Ratan Tata (AMP, 1975), the chairman of Tata Sons.[49] The total construction costs have been estimated at $100 million.[50] Tata Hall is located in the northeast corner of the HBS campus. The facility is devoted to the Harvard Business School's Executive Education programs. At seven stories tall with about 150,000 gross square feet, it contains about 180 bedrooms for education students, in addition to academic and multi-purpose spaces.[51]

Kresge Way was located by the base of the former Kresge Hall, and is named for Sebastian S. Kresge.[52] In 2014, Kresge Hall was replaced by a new hall that was funded by a US$30 million donation by the family of the late Ruth Mulan Chu Chao, whose four daughters all attended Harvard Business School.[53] The Executive Education quad currently includes McArthur, Baker, and Mellon Halls (residences), McCollum and Hawes (classrooms), Chao Center, and Glass (administration).[54]

Harvard Business School (left), Harvard Kennedy School (right), and Weeks Footbridge at sunset

Notable alumni

MBA

  • Andy Jassy, 1997 – CEO, Amazon Web Services[55]
  • Bill Ackman, 1992 – hedge fund manager[4]
  • Mark Albion, 1982 – author, social entrepreneur and co-founder of Net Impact[56]
  • Joseph L. Badaracco – senior associate dean, chair, and professor of business ethics, HBS MBA program; author[57]
  • Rahul Bajaj, 1964 – CEO of Bajaj Auto[58]
  • Raymond W. Baker, 1960 – director of Global Financial Integrity[59]
  • Jim Balsillie, 1989 – billionaire co-CEO of Research In Motion[60]
  • Steve Bannon – former White House advisor and former chairman of Breitbart News Network[61]
  • Alex Behring – co-founder and managing partner of 3G Capital[62][63]
  • Tarek Ben Halim – investment banker and founder of Alfanar, a venture philanthropy organization[64]
  • Dan Benton - Founding CEO, Andor Capital Management[65]
  • Guy Berruyer – French CEO of Sage Group[66]
  • Ernesto Bertarelli The Italian-born Swiss billionaire businessman and philanthropist.
  • Len Blavatnik, 1989 – Ukrainian-American businessman[67]
  • Michael Bloomberg, 1966 – former mayor of New York City[4]
  • Dan Bricklin, 1979 – inventor of the electronic spreadsheet[68]
  • Tracy Britt Cool, 2009 – entrepreneur; former director of Berkshire Hathaway and subsidiaries
  • Jane Buchan CEO of Martlet Asset Management
  • Charles Bunch, 1979 – CEO of PPG Industries[69]
  • Jean Burelle (born 1938/39) – French billionaire chairman and CEO of Burelle[70][71]
  • Steve Burke – NBCUniversal CEO; Comcast executive vice president
  • George W. Bush, 1975 – 43rd President of the United States and former Governor of Texas[4]
  • Liam Byrne, 2010 – politician, British Labour Party Member of parliament[72]
  • Philip Caldwell, 1942 – chairman and CEO of the Ford Motor Company[4]
  • Chase Carey, 1980 – president of News Corporation[4]
  • Cynthia Carroll, 1989 – former CEO of Anglo American PLC[73]
  • Donald J. Carty, 1971 – chairman and CEO of American Airlines[74]
  • Elaine Chao, 1979 – U.S. Secretary of Transportation and former U.S. Secretary of Labor[75]
  • P. Chidambaram, 1968 – former Union Minister of Finance in India[76]
  • Teresa Clarke – former managing director of Goldman Sachs (2004–2010) and CEO and founder of Africa.com[77]
  • Vittorio Colao, 1990 – CEO of Vodafone Group[78]
  • Sherry Coutu, 1993 – former CEO and angel investor[79]
  • Stephen Covey, 1957 – self-help author[4]
  • Zoe Cruz, 1982 – banker; former co-president of Morgan Stanley[80]
  • Philip Hart Cullom, 1988 – U.S. Navy Vice Admiral[81]
  • John D'Agostino, 2002 – managing director of Alkeon Capital and subject of best-selling book Rigged: The True Story of a Wall Street Novice who Changed the World of Oil Forever[82]
  • Daniel A. D'Aniello, 1974 – co-founder of The Carlyle Group[83]
  • Ray Dalio, 1973 – founded Bridgewater Associates[4]
  • Jeffrey Deitch, 1978 – art dealer and gallerist[84]
  • Elisabeth DeMarse, 1980 – CEO of Newser[85]
  • Anne Dias-Griffin, 1997 – hedge fund manager for Aragon Global Management[86]
  • Betty Jane Diener, 1964 (and DBA, 1974) – Virginia Secretary of Commerce (1982–1986)[87]
  • Jamie Dimon, 1982 – CEO and chairman of JPMorgan Chase[4]
  • James Dinan, 1985 – founder of hedge fund York Capital Management[88]
  • Tim Draper, 1984 – venture capital investor[89]
  • Colin Drummond – CEO of Viridor and joint CEO of Pennon Group[90]
  • Donna Dubinsky, 1981 – CEO of Palm, Inc.[91]
  • Axel Dumas, 2010 – CEO of Hermès[92]
  • Erik Engstrom, 2015 – CEO of Reed Elsevier[93]
  • Mary Callahan Erdoes, 1993 – CEO of J.P. Morgan Asset Management[94]
  • Sheldon Erikson, 1970 – chairman, president and CEO of Cameron International Corporation[95]
  • Diana Farrell 1991 – president and CEO of JPMorgan Chase Institute[96]
  • Nicholas Ferguson – chairman of BskyB[97]
  • Trevor Fetter, 1986 – Senior Lecturer at HBS; former CEO of Tenet Healthcare[98]
  • Mark Fields, 1989 – president and CEO of Ford Motor Company[99]
  • Barbara Hackman Franklin, 1964 – 29th U.S. Secretary of Commerce[100]
  • Jane Fraser 1994 – CEO of Citigroup Latin America[101]
  • Morten Friis 1979 – Chief Risk Officer of Royal Bank of Canada[102]
  • William W. George – senior fellow and professor, HBS MBA program; author; former chair and CEO of Medtronic[103]
  • Shikhar Ghosh, 1980 – entrepreneur, lecturer at HBS[104]
  • Melvin Gordon, 1943 – CEO of Tootsie Roll Industries (1962–2015)[105]
  • Allan Gray, 1965 – founder of Allan Gray Investment Management and philanthropist[106]
  • John Grayken – billionaire founder of Lone Star Funds[107]
  • C. Scott Green, 1989 – president of the University of Idaho[108]
  • Ranjay Gulati – professor, HBS MBA program, author[103][109]
  • Rajat Gupta, 1973 – former managing director of McKinsey & Company; convicted of insider trading in the 2011 Galleon Group case[110]
  • Walter A. Haas Jr., 1939 – CEO of Levi Strauss & Co.[4]
  • Ken Hakuta, 1977 – entrepreneur and inventor[111]
  • Dido Harding a British Conservative Party businesswoman serving as chairwoman of NHS Improvement since 2017
  • Fred Hassan, 1972 – CEO of Schering-Plough[112]
  • Rodney A. Hawes Jr., 1969 – CEO of LifeRe and benefactor of the Hawes Hall classroom building[113]
  • Randy Haykin, 1988 – founder of The Intersection Event and The Gratitude Network[114]
  • Fritz Henderson, 1984 – former president and CEO of General Motors[115]
  • John B. Hess, 1977 – CEO of Hess Corporation[116]
  • Andy Hill, 1990 – politician, Washington State Senator[117]
  • Douglas Hodge, 1984 – CEO of PIMCO, charged with fraud for allegedly participating in the 2019 college admissions bribery scandal[118]
  • Chris Hohn British activist investor and billionaire
  • Yoshito Hori, 1991 – founder of Globis University Graduate School of Management[119]
  • Darren Huston, 1994 – CEO of Priceline[120][121]
  • Jennifer Hyman, 2009 – Co-founder and CEO of Rent the Runway[122][123]
  • Jeff Immelt, 1982 – former chairman and CEO of General Electric[124][4]
  • Abigail Johnson, 1988 – chairman of Fidelity Investments[4][125]
  • Ron Johnson, 1984 – former CEO of J. C. Penney[126]
  • Henry Juszkiewicz, 1979 – CEO of Gibson Guitars Inc.[127]
  • George Kaiser, 1966 – chairman of BOK Financial Corporation[4]
  • Steven Kandarian – CEO of Metlife Group[128]
  • Salman Khan, 2003 – founder of Khan Academy[129]
  • Naina Lal Kidwai, 1982 – Group General Manager and Country Head of HSBC India[130]
  • Seth Klarman – billionaire hedge fund manager; Baupost Group founder
  • Jim Koch, 1978 – co-founder and chairman of the Boston Beer Company[4]
  • Robert Kraft, 1965 – chairman and CEO of The Kraft Group, owner of the New England Patriots and New England Revolution[4]
  • Larry S. Kramer, 1974 – founder and CEO of Marketwatch, president and publisher of USA Today[131]
  • A.G. Lafley, 1977 – former CEO and chairman of the board of Procter & Gamble[132]
  • Stephen D. Lebovitz, 1988 – CEO of CBL & Associates Properties[133]
  • William Legge, 10th Earl of Dartmouth – UKIP Member of the European Parliament[134]
  • Michael Lynton, 1987 – chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment[4]
  • William MacDonald, 1940 – Christian preacher and writer in the Plymouth Brethren movement[135]
  • Stephen Mandel – billionaire hedge fund manager; Lone Pine Capital founder
  • Lawrence Marcus, 1940 – Vice-president of Neiman Marcus[136]
  • Prince Maximilian of Liechtenstein, 1998 – president and CEO of LGT Group[137]
  • Tom McGrath – chairman of Broadway Across America, Broadway and film producer[138]
  • Robert McNamara, 1939 – former Secretary of Defense; former president of World Bank[4]
  • W. James McNerney Jr., 1975 – CEO of Boeing[139]
  • Richard Menschel, 1959 – (retired) senior director of Goldman Sachs; 2015 winner of the Carnegie Medal of Philanthropy.[140]
  • Christopher Michel, 1998 – founder and former CEO of Military.com, and founder and former CEO Affinity Labs[141]
  • Hiroshi Mikitani Founder and CEO of Rakuten
  • Karen Mills, 1977 – 23rd Administrator of the Small Business Administration[142]
  • Ann S. Moore, 1978 – CEO of Time Inc.[4][143]
  • David Nelms, 1987 – CEO of Discover Financial Services[144]
  • Grover Norquist, 1981 – president of Americans for Tax Reform[145]
  • Mark Okerstrom, 2004  President/CEO of Expedia Group[146]
  • Neil Pasricha, 2007 – author and speaker[147]
  • Henry Paulson, 1970 – former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, former CEO of Goldman Sachs[4]
  • John Paulson – president of Paulson & Co., a New York-based hedge fund[4]
  • Art Peck, 1979 – CEO of GAP, Inc.[148]
  • Joseph R. Perella, 1972 – founder and CEO of Wasserstein Perella & Co. and Perella Weinberg Partners[149]
  • Chip Perry, 1980 – former president and CEO of TrueCar; first employee and CEO of AutoTrader.com[150][151]
  • Carl Howard Pforzheimer Jr (1907–1996), 1930 – investment banker[152]
  • Mark Pincus – CEO of Zynga[4]
  • Michael B. Polk – CEO of Newell Brands[153]
  • Bruce Rauner, 1981 – 42nd Governor of Illinois[154]
  • Edwin W. Rawlings, 1939 – U.S. Air Force[155] and president and chairman of General Mills[156]
  • John Replogle former CEO of Seventh Generation Inc.
  • Paolo Rocca, 1985 – CEO of Techint[157]
  • Gary Rodkin, 1979 – CEO and president of ConAgra Foods[158]
  • Horacio Rodriguez Larreta, 1992 – Mayor of Buenos Aires
  • Mitt Romney, 1975 – 70th Governor of Massachusetts, co-founder of Bain Capital and 2012 presidential nominee of the Republican Party[4]
  • Wilbur Ross, 1961 – Secretary of Commerce (2017–2021) under the Trump Administration[159]
  • Sheryl Sandberg, 1995 – COO of Facebook[4]
  • Ann Sarnoff, 1987 – president of BBC America[160][161]
  • Ulf Mark Schneider, 1993 – CEO of Nestlé, and former CEO of Fresenius[162]
  • Stephen A. Schwarzman, 1972 – founder of Blackstone Group[4]
  • Joe Shoen, 1973 – billionaire chairman of AMERCO[163]
  • Martin A. Siegel, 1971 — former Kidder, Peabody & Co. investment banker and former Drexel Burnham Lambert managing director; convicted for insider trading in 1987[164]
  • Jayant Sinha 1992 – Union Minister of State for Finance of India[165]
  • Chatri Sityodtong, 1999 – Chairman and CEO of ONE Championship[166]
  • Jeffrey Skilling, 1979 – former CEO of Enron; convicted of securities fraud and insider trading[167]
  • Tad Smith – CEO of Sotheby's[168]
  • Gunnar Sønsteby, 1947 – Norwegian World War Two resistance fighter, most highly decorated person of Norway[169]
  • Guy Spier, 1993 – author and investor[170]
  • E. Roe Stamps 1974 – founding partner of private equity firm Summit Partners[171]
  • Gerald L. Storch – chairman and CEO of Toys "R" Us, Inc.[172]
  • Sandra Sucher – businesswoman; professor, HBS MBA program[173]
  • Anthony Tan, 2011 – co-founder and CEO of Grab[174]
  • Tan Hooi Ling, 2011 – co-founder and CEO of Grab[174]
  • John Thain, 1979 – former CEO of Merrill Lynch[175]
  • Pamela Thomas-Graham, 1988 – businesswoman Clorox, Credit Suisse, and Liz Claiborne, author[176]
  • Whitney Tilson, 1994 – managing partner of T2 Partners[177]
  • Gerald Tremblay, 1972 – mayor of Montreal and former Quebec's Minister of Industry, Commerce, Science and Technology[178]
  • Melvin T. Tukman, 1966 – co-founder and president of Tukman Grossman Capital Management[179][180]
  • David Viniar, 1980 – CFO and executive vice president of Goldman Sachs[181]
  • Rick Wagoner, 1977 – former CEO of General Motors[182]
  • Wendell Weeks, 1987 – chairman, CEO and president of Corning Inc.[183]
  • John C. Whitehead, 1947 – former co-chairman of Goldman Sachs[184]
  • Meg Whitman, 1979 – president and CEO of Hewlett-Packard[4]
  • Nadiem Makarim, 2011 – co-founder and former CEO of Gojek, Minister of Education and Culture of Indonesia[174]
  • Glenn Youngkin, 1994 – former co-CEO of The Carlyle Group[185]

DBA

  • Jay Lorsch, DBA, 1964 – professor, HBS MBA program; contingency theory contributor; author, DBA (1964)[186]
  • George Schussel, DBA, 1966 – founder and former chairman of Digital Consulting Institute and founder of Jellicle Investors, Inc.[187][188]
  • Robert B. Stobaugh, DBA, 1968 – Harvard Business School emeritus professor of Business Administration[189]

Executive Education

Advanced Management Program (AMP)

  • Timothy I. Ahern, 1967 – U.S. Air Force Major General
  • Gabi Ashkenazi, AMP, 2004 – Chief of the General Staff of Israel Defense Forces[190][191]
  • Jaime Zobel de Ayala, 1963 - Filipino businessman and chairman emeritus of Ayala Corporation
  • Julie Bishop, AMP, 1996 – Australian deputy Prime Minister[192]
  • Rick Burr, 2013 – Chief of the Australian Army[193]
  • Alden W. Clausen, 1966 - World Bank Former President
  • Christine M. Day, 2002 – Canadian business executive and former CEO of Lululemon[194]
  • Y. C. Deveshwar – chairman and CEO of ITC Limited[195]
  • Muhammad bin Ibrahim, 2010 – 8th Governor of Central Bank of Malaysia[196]
  • Antony Leung, 1999 – financial secretary of Hong Kong[197]
  • William Lewis, 2009 – Journalist, British Media Executive[198]
  • Minoru Makihara, 1977 - Senior Corporate Advisor, Former Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer, Mitsubishi Corporation[199]
  • Christopher McCormick – president and CEO of L.L. Bean[200]
  • David V. Miller – U.S. Air Force Major General[201]
  • Michael Mullen, 1991 – Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, United States armed forces[202]
  • A. Sivathanu Pillai, 1991 – honorary distinguished professor of Indian Space Research Organisation[203][204]
  • Matthew Barrett (banker), 1981 - Former Chairman and CEO, Bank of Montreal; Chairman and Chief Executive, Barclays Bank
  • Ajay Piramal, 1992 – chairman, Piramal Group[205]
  • Brian J Porter, President and Chief Executive Officer, Scotiabank[206]
  • Ratan Tata, 1975 – chairman and CEO Tata Sons[207]
  • Lucius Theus, AMP 57 - Major General in the United States Air Force
  • Jim Lovell, 1971 – Astronaut, Apollo 13[208]

Other executive education

  • Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede, 2000 – co-founder Access Bank Plc and founder and chairman, Africa Initiative for Governance[209][210]
  • Ciara – American singer[211]
  • Vicente Fox – 55th President of Mexico[212][213]
  • Kilma S. Lattin – Emmy Award-winning Native American leader, military veteran, and business man[214][215][216]
  • Sandro Salsano, businessman and philanthropist[217][218]
  • Jason Tanamor – Filipino-American author[219]
  • Daniel Vasella, PMD, 1989 – president of Novartis AG[220]
  • Howard Zuker also known as Zack Norman, 2005 (OPM 34) – financier, producer and actor

See also

  • Spangler Center
  • List of Harvard University people
  • Category:Harvard Business School alumni
  • List of Ivy League business schools

References

  1. "Statistics – About Us – Harvard Business School". Hbs.edu. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  2. Hess, Abigail (2019-03-12). "The 15 best business schools in the US, according to US News & World Report". CNBC. Retrieved 2019-08-24.
  3. "Out Now: QS Global MBA Rankings 2019". Top Universities. 2018-09-24. Retrieved 2019-08-24.
  4. Baer, Drake; Feloni, Richard (September 18, 2014). "The 25 Most Successful Harvard Business School Graduates". Business Insider. Retrieved July 6, 2016.
  5. Gras, N. S. B. (1946). "Obituary Notice: Edwin Francis Gay". The Economic History Review. 16 (1): 60–62. doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1946.tb00722.x. JSTOR 2590582.
  6. Kaplan, Andreas (2018). "A school is "a building that has four walls…with tomorrow inside": Toward the reinvention of the business school". Business Horizons. 61 (4): 599–608. doi:10.1016/j.bushor.2018.03.010.
  7. Esther Yogev, "Corporate Hand in Academic Glove: The New Management's Struggle for Academic Recognition—The Case of the Harvard Group in the 1920s," American Studies International (2001) 39#1 pp. 52–71 online
  8. Bridgman, Todd; Cummings, Stephen; McLaughlin, Colm (2016). "Restating the Case: How Revisiting the Development of the Case Method Can Help Us Think Differently About the Future of the Business School". Academy of Management Learning & Education. 15 (4): 724–741. doi:10.5465/amle.2015.0291.
  9. Yogev, "Corporate Hand in Academic Glove: The New Management's Struggle for Academic Recognition—The Case of the Harvard Group in the 1920s"
  10. Melvin T. Copeland, And Mark an Era: The Story of the Harvard Business School (1958)
  11. Robert M. Smith, The American Business System: The Theory and Practice of Social Science, the Case of the Harvard Business School, 1920–1945 (Garland Publishers, 1986)
  12. "Building the Foundation: Business Education for Women at Harvard University: 1937–1970". Harvard Business School. Retrieved 3 November 2015.
  13. Kantor, Jodi (September 7, 2013). "Harvard Business School Case Study: Gender Equity". The New York Times. Retrieved September 11, 2017.
  14. "HBS: Global". Harvard Business School. Retrieved 31 January 2017.
  15. "HBS opens research center in Mumbai". Harvard Gazette. 6 April 2006. Retrieved 31 January 2017.
  16. "QS Global MBA Rankings 2020". Quacquarelli Symonds. Retrieved September 26, 2019.
  17. https://www.topuniversities.com/mba-rankings/2021
  18. "World University Rankings 2019 by subject: business and economics". Times Higher Education. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  19. https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/2021/subject-ranking/business-and-economics#!/page/0/length/25/sort_by/rank/sort_order/asc/cols/stats
  20. "Best Global Universities for Economics and Business". U.S. News & World Report. 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  21. "The 50 best business schools in the world 2020". Business Insider. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  22. "Full time MBA ranking". The Economist. 2019. Retrieved January 27, 2020.
  23. "Global MBA Ranking 2020". Financial Times. Retrieved January 27, 2020.
  24. "Best B-Schools". Bloomberg Businessweek. November 8, 2018. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  25. "The Best Business Schools". Forbes. 2019. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  26. "2019 Best Business Schools Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  27. https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-business-schools/mba-rankings
  28. "Best Business Schools". Vault.com. 2017. Retrieved September 25, 2019.
  29. "2021 Best Business Schools". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 19 May 2021.
  30. "Global MBA Ranking 2020". The Financial Times.
  31. Dizik, Alina (27 July 2016). "Smart ways to get Harvard on your CV". BBC. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  32. "Advanced Management Program Overview – Executive Education – Harvard Business School". HBS Executive Education. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  33. "HBS Archives Photograph Collection: Wartime Schools, 1942–1945". Baker Business Historical Collections – HBS Archives. 1942. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  34. Parker, Neal (2016). "Armed With Knowledge: the Wartime Schools at Harvard Business School, 1941–1946". Hollis. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  35. V, Primus (March 1, 2013). "Statistics, No Lies". Harvard Magazine via Harvard Magazine Archive.
  36. Kass, Rudolph (November 10, 1950). "Business School's Advanced Management Program Provides 13-Week Training Course for Already-Successful Executives". The Crimson via The Harvard Crimson Archive.
  37. Glazer, Emily (September 30, 2008). "It's Intense at the Top". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 8, 2019.
  38. "Owner/President Management – Leadership – Programs – Executive Education – Harvard Business School". HBS Executive Education. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  39. "Owner/President Management Program (Executive Education) – Teaching Interest – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  40. "Tyra Banks Enrolls at Harvard Business School – News – The Harvard Crimson". thecrimson.com. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  41. "Online Education Program HBX Rebrands as 'Harvard Business School Online' | News | The Harvard Crimson". thecrimson.com. Retrieved 2019-01-17.
  42. "About the Program – Summer Venture in Management – Harvard Business School". Hbs.edu. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  43. Harvard Business School. Academic Units. Retrieved 16 May 2018.
  44. "Morgan Hall". Harvard Business School. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  45. "Loeb House". Harvard Business School. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  46. "Burden Hall". Harvard Business School. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  47. Nemerenco, Daniela (April 17, 2007). "HBS Limits Auditorium Use". The Harvard Crimson. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  48. "Harvard Business School Receives $50 Million Gift from the Tata Trusts and Companies". Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  49. "Tata Hall Dedicated at HBS". 10 December 2013. Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  50. "HBS Tops Off Tata Hall". Retrieved 14 January 2017.
  51. "A campus built on philanthropy – Tata Hall". Harvard Business School – About us. Retrieved June 19, 2016.
  52. "Harvard Business School – A Campus Built on Philanthropy". Kresge Way – About us. 2016. Retrieved June 19, 2016.
  53. "A campus built on philanthropy – Ruth Mulan Chu Chao Center". Harvard Business School – About us. 2016. Retrieved June 19, 2016.
  54. "HBS Campus". Harvard Business School – Executive Education. 2016. Retrieved June 19, 2016.
  55. Fireside Chat with Michael Skok and Andy Jassy: The History of Amazon Web Services. youtube.com. Harvard Business School. 21 Oct 2013. Retrieved 9 Feb 2021.
  56. Larsen, Natasha (2 December 2013). "HBS Alum Series: Q&A with Dr. Mark Albion HBS/GSAS Class of 1981". harbus.org. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  57. "Joseph L. Badaracco – Faculty – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  58. "Rahul Bajaj – Creating Emerging Markets – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  59. "Q&A – Dirty Money: Raymond Baker Explores the Free Market's Demimonde – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  60. "Sending a Message – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  61. McDonald, Duff. "How Harvard Business School Helped Turn Steve Bannon into a Monster". The Hive. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  62. "Alexandre Behring da Costa". Bloomberg. Retrieved March 25, 2015.
  63. staff, CNBC com (6 October 2014). "Alex Behring". cnbc.com. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  64. "Tarek Ben Halim". 7 January 2010. Retrieved 4 February 2019 via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  65. Taub, Stephen. "Andor Capital's Dan Benton Raises $500m In Comeback". Institutional Investor. Retrieved 25 April 2021.
  66. "Officers & Directors – Reuters.co.uk". uk.reuters.com. Archived from the original on 1 February 2019. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  67. "Harvard Business School Names 2018–2019 Blavatnik Fellows in Life Science Entrepreneurship – News – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  68. "Bricklin Classroom – About – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  69. "#243 Charles E Bunch – Forbes.com". forbes.com. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  70. "Executive Profile: Jean Burelle". Bloomberg. Retrieved 28 July 2017.
  71. "Jean Burelle". Forbes. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  72. "An Evangelist for Entrepreneurs – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  73. "Cynthia Carroll, MBA 1989 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  74. "Leading In a New Era – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  75. "Trump Picks HBS Alumna Elaine Chao for Transportation Secretary – News – The Harvard Crimson". thecrimson.com. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  76. "India's Chidambaram Says Nation Is "Poor Rich" – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  77. "Inside Africa – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  78. "In My Humble Opinion: Vittorio Colao (MBA 1990) – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  79. "Freedom to Explore – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  80. "Zoe Cruz: Being Shoved Out of Your Comfort Zone Has Advantages". Stanford Graduate School of Business. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  81. "Philip Hart Cullom MBA'88, Vice Admiral, US Navy, Retired". hbsclubchicago.org. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  82. "Bloomberg". bloomberg.com. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  83. "Daniel D'Aniello". Forbes. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  84. "When Art Met Finance How Jeffrey Deitch, Citibank, and Christo created the art market as we know it". HBS Alumni. 1 August 2017. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  85. "Intrepid Woman: Elisabeth DeMarse, Chair, President, and CEO of TheStreet.com". theglasshammer.com. 20 March 2015. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  86. "Fighting income inequality with early education reform – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  87. Barnes, Bart (February 17, 2015). "Betty Jane Diener, blunt Virginia secretary of commerce in 1980s, dies". Washington Post. Retrieved February 21, 2015.
  88. "James Dinan & Elizabeth Miller, both MBA 1985 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  89. "Golden State of Mind – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  90. Maps, University of Plymouth Drake Circus Plymouth Devon PL4 8AA United Kingdom +44 1752 600600; vacancies, directions Visit us Job. "Colin Drummond: Chairman". University of Plymouth. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  91. "Donna L. Dubinsky, MBA 1981 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  92. Gröndahl, Marie-Pierre (22 April 2013). "Succession chez Hermès Axel Dumas bien en selle". Paris Match. Retrieved 9 February 2018.
  93. "About Us Mobile- Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  94. "Mentoring Is 'the Best Part of the Job' – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  95. "#106 Sheldon R Erikson – Forbes.com". forbes.com. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  96. University, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs at Georgetown. "Diana Farrell". berkleycenter.georgetown.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  97. "Nicholas Ferguson – Speakers for Schools". speakers4schools.org. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  98. "Trevor Fetter, MBA 1986 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  99. "Q&A – Mark Fields – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  100. "Barbara Hackman Franklin, MBA 1964 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  101. "HBS Club of NY honors five". harvard.edu. 3 May 2016. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  102. "View Content". hbstoronto.ca. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  103. "William W. George – Faculty & Research – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  104. "Shikhar Ghosh – Faculty & Research – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  105. Johnson, Carla K. (January 21, 2015). "Melvin Gordon dies at 95; longtime Tootsie Roll CEO". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 20, 2015.
  106. "Allan W.B. Gray, MBA 1965 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  107. Vardi, Nathan (March 1, 2016). "The Billionaire Banker In The Shadows". Forbes. Retrieved July 24, 2017.
  108. Richert, Kevin (31 July 2019). "'I don't like what's happened over the last 10 years:' C. Scott Green's return to the U of I". idahoednews.org. Retrieved 3 September 2020.
  109. University, © Stanford; Stanford; California 94305. "Linda Hill – Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration Harvard Business School". breakfastbriefings.stanford.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  110. "Rise and fall of Rajat Gupta". 16 June 2012. Retrieved 3 February 2019 via The Economic Times.
  111. "Harvard Art Museums receive $1 million gift to establish the Nam June Paik Fellowship". harvard.edu. 1 December 2016. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  112. "Off Script – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  113. "Hawes Hall Dedicated – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  114. "Social Enterprise Scale-Ups: Creating Ripples of Global Good". Impact Insights. 14 December 2017. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  115. "GM Ousts HBS Alum – News – The Harvard Crimson". thecrimson.com. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  116. "Leading in the face of complex challenges – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  117. "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  118. Byrne, John A. (March 14, 2019). "Poets&Quants | HBS & Stanford MBAs Snared In College Admissions Scandal". Poets&Quants.
  119. hermes (16 September 2018). "It Changed My Life: Top business school founder Yoshito Hori started small in a rented room". The Straits Times. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  120. "Darren R. Huston". CNBC. Retrieved July 3, 2015.
  121. Loudenback, Richard Feloni, Drake Baer, Tanza. "The 31 most successful Harvard Business School graduates of all time". Business Insider. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  122. Evans, Suzy. "Jennifer Hyman and Jennifer Fleiss". 2011 Most Influential Women in Technology. Fast Company. Archived from the original on 18 November 2012. Retrieved 18 October 2012.
  123. "Jennifer Hyman". Harvard Business School Digital Initiative. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  124. "Jeffrey Immelt: How I Remade GE – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  125. "As Head of Fidelity, Abigail Johnson Is Just Getting Started – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  126. Raffaelli, Ryan; Margolis, Joshua D.; Narayandas, Das (24 July 2015). "Ron Johnson: A Career in Retail". Retrieved 3 February 2019 via www.hbs.edu. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  127. "Gibson Hits a High Note – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  128. "Steven Kandarian". spe.org. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  129. "Salman Khan – News – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  130. "Naina Lal Kidwai – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  131. "Alumni Books – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  132. "A. G. Lafley, MBA 1977 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  133. "Cbl & Associates Properties (CBL:New York): Stephen D. Lebovitz". Bloomberg. Retrieved March 8, 2018.
  134. Davison, Emma (10 November 2009). "Our House: Inside the home of Huddersfield’s aristocracy". huddersfieldexaminer. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  135. "William MacDonald – online library of brethren writers". plymouthbrethren.org. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  136. "Noted & Quoted – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  137. "CV" (PDF). lgt.com. Retrieved 2020-03-28.
  138. "STX Entertainment – Talent – Thomas M. McGrath". stxentertainment.com. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  139. "W. James McNerney Jr., MBA 1975 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  140. "I Choose Harvard: Richard L. Menschel MBA '59, P'04, '99, '97". Harvard Alumni. August 6, 2013. Retrieved 15 February 2018.
  141. "Developing Leaders Behind Bars – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  142. "Money20/20 – Karen Gordon Mills, Harvard Business School". us.money2020.com. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  143. "Ann S. Moore – Perspectives – Recruiting – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  144. "David Nelms, Chairman and CEO, Discover". hbsclubchicago.org. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  145. "One-on-One with Grover Norquist – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  146. "CFO of the Year 2014: Mark Okerstrom". bizjournals.com. 14 March 2014. Retrieved 25 November 2019.
  147. "Inside the Bestseller List with Neil Pasricha – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  148. Sacks, Danielle (23 March 2015). "10 Things You Should Know About Gap's New CEO". Fast Company. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  149. "You Only Thought You Were Republican – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  150. David Muller (2019-06-03). "TrueCar CEO Chip Perry is retiring; Darrow named interim leader". Automotive News.
  151. "Impact report 2015–2016" (PDF). Harvard Business School.
  152. "Carl H. Pforzheimer Jr., 89, Leading Investment Banker". The New York Times. Retrieved September 27, 2016.
  153. Berman, Nat (27 January 2019). "10 Things You Didn't Know About Newell Brands CEO Michael Polk". Money Inc. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  154. "Bruce Rauner (MBA '81) Endows New Professorship – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  155. "General Edwin William Rawlings". af.mil/About-Us/Biographies. Retrieved 18 June 2019.
  156. "Edwin W. Rawlings, 93, General And Chairman of Food Company". nytimes.com. Retrieved 18 June 2019.
  157. "#478 Paolo & Gianfelice Mario Rocca – Forbes.com". forbes.com. Retrieved 27 November 2019.
  158. "#336 Gary M Rodkin – Forbes.com". forbes.com. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  159. Harbus, The (10 March 2013). "Investor Wilbur Ross '61 To Visit Campus March 25th". harbus.org. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  160. Faughnder, Ryan. "Warner Bros. is getting its first female CEO, BBC's Ann Sarnoff". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  161. "Warner Bros. names BBC's Ann Sarnoff as its new CEO". WTVC. 24 June 2019. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  162. "Story Details – Alumni – Harvard Business School".
  163. "How Joe Shoen Got U-Haul Back on Track – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  164. Wilkes, Paul (22 January 1989). "The Tough Job Of Teaching Ethics". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 March 2019.
  165. » Portfolios of the Union Council of Ministers (March 7, 2015). "Portfolios of the Union Council of Ministers | Prime Minister of India". Pmindia.gov.in. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  166. "Checking in with ONE Championship – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  167. "Lesson from the Fall – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  168. "Tad Smith". NYU. Retrieved 17 March 2015.
  169. "Gunnar Sonsteby: Norway's most decorated war hero". The Independent. 11 June 2012. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  170. "Book Review: My Lunch with Warren – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  171. "E. Roe Stamps IV, MBA 1974 – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  172. "Veteran retailer named HBC CEO – The Star". thestar.com. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  173. "Sandra J. Sucher – Faculty & Research – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  174. https://www.alumni.hbs.edu/stories/Pages/story-impact.aspx?num=5779
  175. "Hope for Reform Dims – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  176. "Pamela Thomas Graham – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  177. Salzman, Avi. "Bargaining With a Fearful Market". wsj.com. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  178. Nov 05, CBC News · Posted; November 6, 2012 7:06 PM ET; 2012. "Montreal mayor's legacy tarnished by scandal – CBC News". CBC. Retrieved 31 January 2019.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  179. "Company Overview of Tukman Grossman Capital Management, Inc.: Melvin Theodore Tukman". Bloomberg Business. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  180. "Committed to HBS'S Success: Keeping HBS Competitive". Harvard Business School. March 1, 2015. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  181. "David Viniar '72". bxscience.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  182. "Can't Forget the Motor City – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  183. Young, Susan (25 August 2014). "Wendell P. Weeks, MBA 1987: 2014 Alumni Achievement Award Recipient". HBS. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  184. "Remembering John Whitehead (MBA 1947) – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  185. "Two HBS Alumni To Lead Carlyle Group". Harvard Business School. October 27, 2017. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  186. "Jay W. Lorsch – Faculty & Research – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  187. "George Schussel • IEEE Computer Society". computer.org. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  188. "Dr. George Schussel". IT History Society. 21 December 2015. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  189. "Robert B. Stobaugh (DBA '68) – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  190. "Gabi Ashkenazi: Curriculum Vitae – Israel – Jerusalem Post". jpost.com. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  191. "Gabi Ashkenazi". harvardwarcriminals.blogspot.com. Retrieved 31 January 2019.
  192. "In My Humble Opinion: Julie Bishop (AMP 151, 1996) – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  193. "Chief of Army change of command service". MSN. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  194. "Innovation: Frozen Assets – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  195. "Yogesh Chander Deveshwar, ITC". outlookindia.com/. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  196. "KWAP – Datuk Muhammad Bin Ibrahim". kwap.gov.my. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  197. 李松. "The banker who helped build Greater Bay Area – Chinadaily.com.cn". chinadaily.com.cn. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  198. "Will Lewis and the Harvard Business School big guns". The Guardian. 9 July 2010. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  199. https://www.alumni.hbs.edu/stories/Pages/story-bulletin.aspx?num=2014
  200. Inc, Big Lots. "Big Lots Appoints Two New Directors To Its Board After The Planned Retirement Of Existing Board Members". prnewswire.com. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  201. "MAJOR GENERAL DAVID V. MILLER > U.S. Air Force > Biography Display". af.mil. Retrieved 30 January 2019.
  202. "At Ease – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 2 February 2019.
  203. "Dr. A. Sivathanu Pillai, Ph.D, D.Sc". ishaeducation.org. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  204. "Celebrating Science and Scientists with Dr Sivathanu Pillai". mechfisat.com. 26 February 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  205. "Building a better India through business and philanthropy – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  206. https://www.scotiabank.com/ca/en/about/our-company/executive-management/brian-j-porter.html
  207. "Tata Hall – About – Harvard Business School". hbs.edu. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  208. ?num=3367 "2010 Alumni Achievement Award Recipient – Alumni – Harvard Business School" Check |url= value (help). alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 1 January 2010.
  209. Hyde, Peace (1 November 2016). "When We Started, All Hell Broke Loose". forbesafrica.com. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  210. "NSE Appoints Mr. Aigboje Aig-Imoukhuede & Mr. Abimbola as first & second Vice-Presidents". Proshareng (Nigeria). Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  211. Saponara, Michael (June 3, 2019). "Ciara Celebrates Graduating From Harvard University: 'My College Dream Has Come True'". Billboard. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  212. Tribune, Chicago. "- Several articles about Mexican President Vicente..." chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  213. "Fox a self-made man known for tart tongue". bostonherald.com. 8 January 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2019.
  214. "Harvard Business School Graduates". Alumni US. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  215. "Harvard Business School: Leadership for Senior Executives". Harvard Business School. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  216. "Kilma Lattin, Accomplished La Jollan, Champions Many Causes". La Jolla Blue Book. Retrieved September 20, 2020.
  217. "Bio – Salsano Group". salsanogroup.com. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  218. "Sandro Salsano – keynote speaker". gspeakers.com. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  219. https://www.linkedin.com/in/jason-tanamor
  220. "Daniel Vasella – Alumni – Harvard Business School". alumni.hbs.edu. Retrieved 30 January 2019.

Further reading

  • Anteby, Michel. Manufacturing Morals: The Values of Silence in Business School Education. (University of Chicago Press, 2013), a faculty view
  • Bridgman, T., Cummings, S & McLaughlin, C. (2016). Re-stating the case: How revisiting the development of the case method can help us think differently about the future of the business school. Academy of Management Learning and Education, 15(4): 724–741
  • Broughton, P.D. Ahead of the Curve: Two Years at the Harvard Business School. (Penguin Press, 2008), a memoir
  • Cohen, Peter. The gospel according to the Harvard Business School. (Doubleday, 1973)
  • Copeland, Melvin T. And Mark an Era: The Story of the Harvard Business School (1958)
  • Cruikshank, Jeffrey. Shaping The Waves: A History Of Entrepreneurship At Harvard Business School . (Harvard Business Review Press, 2005)
  • McDonald, Duff (2017). The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite. ISBN 978-0-06-234717-6.
  • Smith, Robert M. The American Business System: The Theory and Practice of Social Science, the Case of the Harvard Business School, 1920–1945 (Garland Publishers, 1986)
  • Yogev, Esther. "Corporate Hand in Academic Glove: The New Management's Struggle for Academic Recognition—The Case of the Harvard Group in the 1920s," American Studies International (2001) 39#1 online
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.