Hansi Flick

Hans-Dieter "Hansi" Flick (born 24 February 1965) is a German professional football coach and former player who is the manager of the Germany national team. From August 2006 to July 2014, he was the assistant coach of Germany under manager Joachim Löw. In August 2020, Flick won the UEFA Champions League as the manager of Bayern, completing the club's second continental treble. In 2021, he also led the side to a FIFA Club World Cup and another Bundesliga title.[2]

Hansi Flick
Flick in 2011
Personal information
Full name Hans-Dieter Flick[1]
Date of birth (1965-02-24) 24 February 1965
Place of birth Heidelberg, West Germany
Height 1.77 m (5 ft 10 in)
Position(s) Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Germany (head coach)
Youth career
1971–1976 BSC Mückenloch
1976–1981 SpVgg Neckargemünd
1981–1983 SV Sandhausen
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1983–1985 SV Sandhausen
1985–1990 Bayern Munich 104 (5)
1990–1993 1. FC Köln 44 (1)
1994–2000 Victoria Bammental
National team
1983 Germany U18 2 (0)
Teams managed
1996–2000 Victoria Bammental
2000–2005 1899 Hoffenheim
2006–2014 Germany (assistant)
2019 Bayern Munich (assistant)
2019–2021 Bayern Munich
2021– Germany
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Playing career

As a player, he was a midfielder who played 104 matches for Bayern Munich and scored five goals between 1985 and 1990,[3] where he won four Bundesliga titles as well as one DFB-Pokal title, and played in the 1987 European Cup Final.[4] He later played 44 matches for Köln before retiring from professional football in 1993 due to injuries. His last spell as a footballer was with Victoria Bammental from 1994 until 2000.

He never played for the Germany national football team, but he made two appearances for the Germany under-18 team, in the group stage of the 1983 UEFA European Under-18 Championship on 15 and 17 May 1983, in a 1–0 win over Sweden and in a 3–1 win over Bulgaria, respectively.

Managerial career

Flick's managerial career began in 1996 as a player-manager of Viktoria Bammental, which was playing in the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg at that time. At the end of the 1998–99 season, the club was relegated to the Verbandsliga Baden, but Flick remained their coach for one more season.

1899 Hoffenheim

In July 2000, he became a manager of the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg side 1899 Hoffenheim, winning the league and gaining promotion to the Regionalliga Süd in his first season at the club. After four unsuccessful attempts to reach the 2. Bundesliga, he was released from duties on 19 November 2005.[5][6]

Red Bull Salzburg (assistant)

Flick then worked briefly as an assistant of Giovanni Trapattoni and Lothar Matthäus and sporting coordinator at Red Bull Salzburg.[5] Flick stated that his work under Trapattoni, one of the world's most renowned managers, taught him many things, especially on tactics and in developing relations with players, but also said that he disagreed with Trapattoni's defence-first approach.[7]

Germany (assistant)

Flick in 2006

He was named the assistant coach for Germany on 23 August 2006. Although not listed as an officially recognized manager by the DFB, due to the sending off of Joachim Löw in the previous game, Flick was technically the German manager for the UEFA Euro 2008 quarter final against Portugal on 19 June 2008, which ended in a 3–2 win for Germany. After finishing second at the UEFA Euro 2008 and third at the 2010 FIFA World Cup, he reached the semi-finals at the UEFA Euro 2012 and won the 2014 FIFA World Cup as assistant coach of Germany. He became sporting director at the German Football Association after the 2014 World Cup until 16 January 2017.[8][9]

Bayern Munich

On 1 July 2019, he joined Bayern Munich as an assistant coach, under the management of Niko Kovač.[10] When Kovač left Bayern by mutual consent on 3 November 2019, Flick was promoted to the interim manager position.[11][12] In his first match in charge, Bayern defeated Olympiacos 2–0 in the UEFA Champions League group stage on 6 November 2019.[13] After a satisfying spell as interim coach, Bayern announced on 22 December 2019 that Flick will remain manager until the end of season.[14]

In April 2020, Bayern Munich gave Flick a new contract lasting until 2023.[15]

During the 2019–20 season, Flick successfully guided Bayern to win the Bundesliga, DFB-Pokal and UEFA Champions League, thus completing the continental treble for the second time in the club's history.[16] He was subsequently named German Football Manager of the Year by sports magazine kicker,[17] and also won the UEFA Men's Coach of the Year Award.[18] The following season, he led Bayern to win the 2020 UEFA Super Cup against Sevilla.[19] He also led Bayern to win its first ever sextuple after winning Club World Cup in February 2021 by defeating Mexican team Tigres.[20]

On 17 April 2021, Flick announced that he had told the club he wanted to leave at the end of the season. He voiced his desire to coach the German national football team, given his previous job as an assistant to present German team manager, Joachim Löw. Flick left Bayern with one of the greatest winning records in modern football history. During his tenure, Bayern lost just seven games and won seven trophies (Bundesliga twice, DFB-Pokal, Champions League, DFL-Supercup, UEFA Supercup, Club World Cup). Bayern went undefeated in the 2019–20 Champions League, the first team in European/Champions League history to lift the trophy with a 100-per-cent win record, and won 23 matches in a row across all competitions between 16 February 2020 and 18 September 2020, a record in German professional football. Flick also coached Bayern to a treble, the second treble in Bayern's history. Flick held one of the highest win rates in football history, winning 83% of his games and helped Bayern average 3.0 goals per game across all competitions.[21] In October 2020, Flick won Europe's Coach of the Year, an award for the best coach in football in the major football leagues of Europe.[21]

Germany

On 25 May 2021, the German Football Association announced that Flick signed a three-year contract from 1 August 2021 to serve as the manager of the Germany national team, replacing his former boss Joachim Löw after the team competes in UEFA Euro 2020. His first match in charge will be against Liechtenstein in 2022 FIFA World Cup qualifying on 2 September 2021.[2]

Personal life

Flick is married to Silke Flick. As of 2020, they have been married for over 30 years. They have two children and two grandchildren.[22][23]

Managerial statistics

As of match played 22 May 2021
TeamFromToRecord
MWDLGFGAGDWin %Ref.
Victoria Bammental[lower-alpha 1]1 July 199630 June 2000 122 44 33 45 205 218 −13 036.07 [24][25][26][27]
1899 Hoffenheim[lower-alpha 1]1 July 200019 November 2005 196 88 46 62 345 263 +82 044.90 [28][29][30][31][32][33]
Bayern Munich3 November 201930 June 2021 86 70 9 7 255 85 +170 081.40 [34][35]
Germany1 August 2021 0 0 0 0 0 0 +0 !
Total 404 202 88 114 805 566 +239 050.00
  1. Statistics do not include regional cup competitions.

Honours

Flick (far left) celebrates the 2014 FIFA World Cup win

Player

Bayern Munich

  • Bundesliga: 1985–86, 1986–87, 1988–89, 1989–90
  • DFB-Pokal: 1985–86
  • DFB-Supercup: 1987
  • European Cup runner-up: 1986–87

1. FC Köln

  • DFB-Pokal runner-up: 1990–91

Managerial

Germany (as assistant manager)

TSG 1899 Hoffenheim

  • Oberliga Baden-Württemberg: 2000–01

Bayern Munich

Individual

  • UEFA Men's Coach of the Year: 2019–20[38]
  • IFFHS World's Best Club Coach: 2020[39]
  • World Soccer Men's Manager of the Year 2020[40]
  • Globe Soccer Best Coach of the Year: 2020[41]
  • German Football Manager of the Year: 2020[17]
  • VDV Bundesliga Coach of the Season: 2019–20[42]

References

  1. "Squad List: FIFA Club World Cup Qatar 2020: FC Bayern München" (PDF). FIFA. 1 February 2021. p. 3. Retrieved 11 June 2021.
  2. "Hansi Flick wird neuer Bundestrainer" [Hansi Flick is the new national coach]. German Football Association (in German). 25 May 2021. Retrieved 25 May 2021.
  3. "Flick, Hans-Dieter". kicker.de (in German). Nuremberg: kicker. Retrieved 26 May 2011.
  4. "Hansi Flick: 10 things on Bayern Munich's record-breaking, treble-winning coach". Bundesliga. August 2020.
  5. "Flick als Co-Trainer der DFB-Auswahl vorgestellt – Köpke verlängert bis 2008" [Flick introduced as assistant coach of the DFB national team – Köpke extends until 2008]. dfb.de (in German). Frankfurt: DFB. 24 August 2006. Archived from the original on 6 November 2019. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  6. "Retortenclub: DFB genehmigt Hoffenheimer Fußballfusion" [Retort Club: DFB approved Hoffenheim football fusion]. Der Spiegel (in German). Hamburg. 30 November 2005. Retrieved 5 November 2019.
  7. "Interview Hansi Flick". Rund-Magazin.de (in German). January 2014. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  8. "DFB stimmt Wunsch von Flick nach Vertragsauflösung zu" [DFB agrees to Flick's request for contract termination]. dfb.de (in German). Frankfurt: DFB. 16 January 2017. Retrieved 16 January 2017.
  9. "Hans-Dieter Flick steps down as German Football Association sporting director". football.co.uk. 16 January 2017. Retrieved 7 February 2017.
  10. "Hansi Flick interviewed: 'A top job and a club that's very close to my heart'". fcbayern.com. Bayern Munich. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 19 August 2019.
  11. "FC Bayern and head coach Niko Kovac part company". fcbayern.com. Bayern Munich. 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  12. "Bayern München trennt sich von Trainer Kovac" [Bayern Munich separates from coach Kovac]. kicker.de (in German). Nuremberg: kicker. 3 November 2019. Retrieved 3 November 2019.
  13. "Robert Lewandowski on target again as Bayern Munich down Olympiacos to reach UEFA Champions League last 16". bundesliga.com. 6 November 2019. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  14. "Flick to remain FC Bayern head coach until end of season". fcbayern.com. Bayern Munich. 22 December 2019. Retrieved 26 December 2019.
  15. "Bayern gives coach Hansi Flick permanent deal through 2023". USA Today. 3 April 2020.
  16. "Bayern beat PSG to win Champions League". BBC Sport. 23 August 2020.
  17. "Flick löst Klopp als Trainer des Jahres ab". kicker.de (in German). 30 August 2020.
  18. "Men's Coach of the Year: Flick, Klopp or Nagelsmann". UEFA. 23 September 2020. Retrieved 23 September 2020.
  19. "Bayern win Super Cup: Javi Martínez heads extra-time winner against Sevilla". UEFA. 24 September 2020. Retrieved 24 September 2020.
  20. "Bayern Munich win Club World Cup for sixth trophy in a year". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  21. "Flick leaving Bayern: A record win rate and a trophy every 14 games – the key numbers behind departing coach's tenure". sportsmax.tv. 17 May 2021. Retrieved 23 May 2021.
  22. "Hansi Flick: Privatleben und Karriere – alle Infos zum Bayern-Trainer". Retrieved 23 August 2020.
  23. "Hansi Flick: 5 things on Bayern Munich's new coach". Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  24. "FC Bammental " Fixtures & Results 1996/1997". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  25. "FC Bammental " Fixtures & Results 1997/1998". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  26. "Verbandsliga Nordbaden, Saison 1998/99" [Verbandsliga Nordbaden, 1998–99 season]. ASC Neuenheim (in German). Archived from the original on 26 November 2019. Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  27. "Verbandsliga Nordbaden, Saison 1999/00" [Verbandsliga Nordbaden, 1999–2000 season]. ASC Neuenheim (in German). Archived from the original on 26 November 2019. Retrieved 26 November 2019.
  28. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2000/2001". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  29. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2001/2002". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  30. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2002/2003". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  31. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2003/2004". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  32. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2004/2005". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  33. "1899 Hoffenheim " Fixtures & Results 2005/2006". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  34. "Bayern München " Fixtures & Results 2019/2020". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 6 November 2019.
  35. "Bayern München " Fixtures & Results 2020/2021". WorldFootball.net. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  36. "Bayern Munich win the Champions League: How social media reacted to the Bavarians being kings of Europe". ESPN. 23 July 2020. Retrieved 23 July 2020.
  37. "Pavard completes sextuple for dominant Bayern". FIFA. 11 February 2021. Retrieved 11 February 2021.
  38. "Hansi Flick wins Men's Coach of the Year award". UEFA. 1 October 2020. Retrieved 1 October 2020.
  39. "IFFHS WORLD AWARDS 2020 – THE WINNERS". IFFHS. 4 December 2020. Retrieved 4 December 2020.
  40. "2020 Winners". World Soccer. Winter 2020. p. 39.
  41. "Flick Globe Soccer Best Coach of the Year 2020". Retrieved 27 December 2020.
  42. "Flick VDV Bundesliga Coach of the Season". spielergewerkschaft.de. 1 October 2020. Retrieved 27 December 2020.
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