Ascites

Background

  • Abnormal buildup of peritoneal fluid

Causes

Clinical Features

Differential Diagnosis

Abdominal distention

Evaluation

  • Ascites in females with no other reason for it = gyn neoplasm until proven otherwise (ovarian cancer)

Workup

  • CBC
  • Chem 7
  • PT/PTT
  • LFTs + lipase
  • FAST

Ascites Fluid Workup

  • Cell count and differential
  • Albumin
  • Total protein
  • Only if suspicious:[3]
    • Gram stain
    • Glucose
    • LDH
    • Amylase
    • AFB smear and culture
    • Cytology
    • Triglyceride

Ascites Diagnosis

  • Low SAAG < 1.1 g/dL
    • Malignancy / peritoneal carcinomatosis
    • Nephrotic syndrome
    • Pancreatitis
    • Peritoneal tuberculosis
    • Serositis
    • Bowel infarction
    • Chylous

Management

  • Salt restriction
    • Effective in about 15% of patients
  • Diuretics
    • Spironolactone
      • Starting dose = 100mg/day PO (max 400mg/day)
      • 40% of patients will respond
    • Furosemide
      • 40mg/day PO (max 160mg/day)
      • Ratio of 100:40 with spironolactone (reduces risks of potassium prob)
  • Water restriction
  • Paracentesis
  • Consider liver transplantation and shunting

Disposition

  • Frequently outpatient, once SBP is ruled out, if a known reason for ascites and sufficiently therapeutically drained

Complications

See Also

References

  1. Runyon BA. Care of patients with ascites. N Eng J Med. 1994; 330: 337-342.
  2. http://www.thepocusatlas.com/bowel/
  3. Runyon BA. Management of adult patients with ascites due to cirrhosis: update 2012. Amer Assoc Study Liv Dis. 2012; 1-96.
  4. Runyon BA. Management of adult patients with ascites due to cirrhosis: update 2012. Amer Assoc Study Liv Dis. 2012; 1-96.
  5. Runyon BA. Cardiac ascites: a characterization. J Clin Gastro. 1998; 10(4): 410-412.
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