What should I take into account when I want to switch to wireless sub/speakers?

2

I'm a mobile DJ so I'm setting up my circus tent and breaking it down multiple times a week. Staying organized really helps, and anything that can save time is precious. Currently I have a sub and speaker for left and right channels coming out of my mixing board. I daisy-chain from the sub to the speaker.

I saw this wireless transmitter-receiver combo recently. Life without having to run 100 ft cables would be unbelievably awesome.

Before investing a ton of money into a wireless system, I figured I would ask for advice. What features I should be looking for in such a system?

Raj More

Posted 2019-08-01T18:56:49.470

Reputation: 175

How many channels do you want to use this for? – Hobbes – 2019-08-01T19:03:26.060

And if you're running more than a few 100ft cables, there are alternatives. – Hobbes – 2019-08-01T19:14:47.277

@Hobbes, I have a sub and speaker for left and right channels coming out of my mixing board. I daisy-chain from the sub to the speaker. – Raj More – 2019-08-01T20:19:05.537

Answers

3

Advantages:

  • saves you rolling out 2 long cables.

Disadvantages:

  • it's a 2.4 GHz system so there's potential for interference from wifi.
  • they add a bit of delay, although 4 ms is not horrendous.
  • you have to remember to recharge the batteries for each gig.
  • every 3-5 years you have to replace the batteries because they wear out.

I use a couple of wireless mics (Sennheiser, a different product range that uses ~700 MHz transmitters) and I get occasional interference. When that happens I switch to another mic I have on standby. If you get interference in your speaker link, you're toast. You can't even close a fader to get rid of the noise.

As an alternative: get a cable reel, and roll 2 long XLR cables onto that. This is quicker than rolling up individual cables, and it reduces the chance of tangling.

Hobbes

Posted 2019-08-01T18:56:49.470

Reputation: 1 478