Materials testing of 3D printed parts

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What parameters are needed when preparing to model a 3D printed part in (ANSYS or Abaqus)?

Are there specific tests?

Update

We have been using FDM printing, with PLA. Our parts are for a quadcopter arm.

I'm not worried immediately about having a strong part, I'm ultimately interested in modeling any 3D printed part. I think more important parameters are the printing parameters like bed temp, nozzle temp, layer height etc..

user4038

Posted 2016-08-30T00:54:34.480

Reputation: 41

What kind of 3D printed part? What printing technique? What material? – Tom van der Zanden – 2016-08-30T09:14:13.123

We have been using FDM printing, with PLA. Our parts are for a quadcopter arm – user4038 – 2016-08-30T13:14:08.717

1Please use ABS first if you want a better strength! – Jash Jacob – 2016-09-02T10:27:12.340

I'm not worried immediately about having a strong part, I'm ultimately interested in modeling any 3D printed part. I think more important parameters are the printing parameters like bed temp, nozzle temp, layer height... – user4038 – 2016-09-02T14:41:39.190

@user4038 For general comments or conversation, please utilize the comments section. Only post an answer if it, in some way, provides a solution for the question posted. – tbm0115 – 2016-09-02T15:47:54.227

@user4038, I added your comments directly to your question (you can do this yourself with the "edit" button below the question text). – Tormod Haugene – 2016-09-03T08:21:49.793

Answers

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As with all AM related simulation existing FEM codes are not well suited to solving the material addition issue.

It is very hard for the codes you mentioned to simulate layer-by-layer and toolpath-by-toolpath material addition.

There has been significant research in AM simulation, most of it focuses on the metal additive manufacturing processes. The simulation of the entire build process with complex geometry and material addition almost never occurs due to computational cost. For example this work is one of the most sophiticated simulations developed and it is so computationally expensive that only a single laser scan was performed.

If what you actually want to achieve is stress/deformation of a FDM part then perform a structual analysis using anisotropic material properties that match that of your printed parts. I would assume that by now data for material properties of FDM parts with respect to machine parameters would be known at least for commonly implemented materials such as ABS and PC.

plaintoothpaste

Posted 2016-08-30T00:54:34.480

Reputation: 86