< Radiation astronomy < Protons
An artist's view of the Van Allen Probes spacecraft constellation is illustrated. Credit: JHU/APL.

Proton astronomy is a lecture and an article as part of the radiation astronomy course on the principles of radiation astronomy.

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Quiz







  

1

Complete the text:

At the high end of the proton energy spectrum (above ≈ 1018 eV) the

radius deflection becomes

enough that proton astronomy becomes

.

2

Yes or No, It has recently been suggested by Cane et al. 2002 that a class of type III solar radio bursts, called type III-l, is reliably associated with intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events.

Yes
No

3

The slowing down of a projectile proton due to the inelastic collisions between bound electrons in the medium and the proton moving through it?

4

True or False, An antiproton is a proton moving backward in time.

TRUE
FALSE

5

Complete the text:

Match up the radiation letter with each of the detector possibilities below:
Meteors - A
Cosmic rays - B
Neutrons - C
Protons - D
Electrons - E
Positrons - F
Neutrinos - G
Muons - H
Gamma rays - I
X-rays - J
Ultraviolet rays - K
Optical rays - L
Visual rays - M
Violet rays - N
Blue rays - O
Cyan rays - P
Green rays - Q
Yellow rays - R
Orange rays - S
Red rays - T
Infrared rays - U
Submillimeter rays - V
Radio rays - W
Superluminal rays - X
multialkali (Na-K-Sb-Cs) photocathode materials

.
F547M

.
511 keV gamma-ray peak

.
F675W

.
broad-band filter centered at 404 nm

.
a cloud chamber

.
ring-imaging Cherenkov

.
coherers

.
effective area is larger by 104

.
F588N

.
pyroelectrics

.
a blemish about 8,000 km long

.
a metal-mesh achromatic half-wave plate

.
coated with lithium fluoride over aluminum

.
thallium bromide (TlBr) crystals

.
F606W

.
aluminum nitride

.
heavy water

.
18 micrometers FWHM at 490 nm

.
wide-gap II-VI semiconductor ZnO doped with Co2+ (Zn1-xCoxO)

.
a recoiling nucleus

high-purity germanium

.
magnetic deflection to separate out incoming ions

.
2.2-kilogauss magnet used to sweep out electrons

.

6

True or False, A small amount of aluminum-26 is produced by collisions of magnesium atoms with cosmic-ray protons.

TRUE
FALSE

7

Complete the text:

Match up the item letter with each of the possibilities below:
Meteors - A
Cosmic rays - B
Neutrons - C
Protons - D
Electrons - E
Positrons - F
Gamma rays - G
Superluminals - H
X-ray jets

the index of refraction is often greater than 1 just below a resonance frequency

.
iron, nickel, cobalt, and traces of iridium

.
Sagittarius X-1

.
escape from a typical hard low-mass X-ray binary

.
collisions with argon atoms

.
X-rays are emitted as they slow down

.
Henry Moseley using X-ray spectra

.

8

True or False, The spin carried by quarks is not sufficient to account for the total spin of protons.

TRUE
FALSE

9

Which of the following is not in the history of neutrino astronomy?

Enrico Fermi coined the term "neutrino"
Wolfgang Pauli postulated the muon neutrino
in the Cowan–Reines neutrino experiment, antineutrinos are created
a hydrogen bubble chamber was used to detect neutrinos
Niels Bohr was opposed to the neutrino interpretation of beta decay
a neutrino hitting a proton is detectable

10

What is a pfu?

a measure of neutron half-life suggested by Enrico Fermi
a particle flux
a unit per steradian (sr)
the number of bubbles generated in a hydrogen bubble chamber used to detect neutrinos
Niels Bohr was opposed to the pfu interpretation of beta decay
a measure of the scatter energy of a neutrino hitting a proton

11

True or False, The radius of the proton is 4 percent smaller than previously estimated.

TRUE
FALSE

12

Space radiation may be classified according to origin as?

galactic cosmic radiation
charged particles in large clouds
solar particle radiation
interaction with the geo-electric field
protons and electrons
geomagnetically trapped particle radiation

13

True or False, The infrared spectra of olivine and enstatite are essentially unchanged after proton bombardment.

TRUE
FALSE

14

A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas or plasma in a narrow cone of particles?

15

If there was no nuclear force, all nuclei with two or more protons would fly apart because of the electromagnetic?

16

True or False, A proton and neutron will have lower energy when their spins are anti-parallel, not parallel.

TRUE
FALSE

17

As an analysis method NRA may be associated with which phenomena?

a concentration vs. depth distribution
charged particles in large clouds
target elements may undergo a nuclear reaction
projectile stopping power is unknown
proton elastic scattering
a nuclear method in materials science

18

The evolution of organics to carbonaceous material induced by proton irradiation is a well established phenomenon independent of the type of original carbon containing material.

TRUE
FALSE

19

Complete the text:

Diamond nanocrystals (size 100 nm) emit bright

at 600–800 nm when exposed to green and yellow photons. The photoluminescence, arising from excitation of the

defect centers created by proton-beam

and thermal annealing, closely resembles the extended red emission (ERE) bands observed in reflection nebulae and

nebulae. The central wavelength of the emission is 700 nm.

20

The cosmic infrared background (CIB) causes a significant attenuation for very high energy protons through inverse Compton scattering, photopion and electron-positron pair production.

TRUE
FALSE

Hypotheses

  1. More technical details in questions may be better.

See also

{{Radiation astronomy resources}}

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