Zulfikarpašić–Karadžić agreement

Muslim-Serbian agreement[a]
Type Political
Context Breakup of Yugoslavia
Drafted June 1991
Negotiators
Parties Bosnian Muslims (Party of Democratic Action, SDA) and Bosnian Serbs (Serb Democratic Party, SDS)

In June 1991, representatives of Bosnian Muslims (Party of Democratic Action, SDA) and Bosnian Serbs (Serb Democratic Party, SDS) met to discuss the future status of SR Bosnia and Herzegovina during the Yugoslav crisis. On behalf of SDA president Alija Izetbegović, Adil Zulfikarpašić and Muhamed Filipović met with SDS president Radovan Karadžić, Nikola Koljević and Momčilo Krajišnik. The two sides reached an agreement[a] that BiH was to be sovereign and undivided, remaining in a Yugoslav confederation with Serbia and Montenegro. The Muslim-inhabited area of Sandžak in SR Serbia was to become autonomous, while SAO Krajina and SAO Bosanska Krajina was to abandon their unification plan. Zulfikarpašić received the consent of Serbian President Slobodan Milošević, who also promised 60% of Sandžak to BiH. Izetbegović, who initially supported it, abandoned the agreement.

Annotations

  1. ^ Also known as "Serb-Muslim agreement",[1] "Muslim-Serb agreement",[2] "Muslim-Serbian agreement",[3][4] etc.

See also

References

  1. Janusz Bugajski (1994). Ethnic Politics in Eastern Europe: A Guide to Nationality Policies, Organizations, and Parties. M.E. Sharpe. pp. 27–. ISBN 978-1-56324-282-3.
  2. Bruce W. Jentleson; Carnegie Commission on Preventing Deadly Conflict (2000). Opportunities Missed, Opportunities Seized: Preventive Diplomacy in the Post-Cold War World. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 170–. ISBN 978-0-8476-8559-2.
  3. JPRS Report: East Europe. Foreign Broadcast Information Service. 1991. p. 32.
  4. Susan L. Woodward (1 April 1995). Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution after the Cold War. Brookings Institution. p. 465. ISBN 978-0-8157-2295-3. Muslim-Serbian Agreement [between Adil Zulfikarpašić and Radovan Karadžić].

Sources

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