Women's Hockey World Cup

Women's Hockey World Cup
Current season, competition or edition:
2018 Women's Hockey World Cup
Sport Field hockey
Founded 1974
No. of teams 12
Continent International (FIH)
Most recent
champion(s)
 Netherlands (8th title)
Most titles  Netherlands (8 titles)
Official website www.fih.ch

The Women's Hockey World Cup is the field hockey World Cup competition for women, whose format for qualification and final tournament is similar to the men's. It has been held since 1974. The tournament has been organized by the International Hockey Federation (FIH) since they merged with the International Federation of Women's Hockey Associations (IFWHA) in 1982. Since 1986, it has been held regularly once every four years, in the same year as the men's competition, which is mid cycle between Summer Olympic games.

Of the fourteen tournaments held so far, only four teams have won the event. Netherlands is by far the most successful team, having won the title eight times. Argentina, Germany and Australia are joint second best teams, having each won the title twice. So far, Netherlands and Australia are the two champions able to defend their titles. At the end of the 2018 World Cup, fifteen nations had reached the semifinal of the tournament.

The size of the tournament has changed over time. The 1974 and 1978 World Cups featured 10 nations (smallest); the 1976 World Cup featured 11 nations; the 2002 World Cup featured 16 nations (largest); and the remaining seven World Cups have featured 12 nations. The World Cup will expand to 16 teams again in 2018, and the FIH will evaluate the possibility of increasing it to 24 in 2022.[1]

The 2018 tournament was held in London, England from 21 of July to 5 August,[2] with Netherlands winning a consecutive second title and a record eighth title after beating Ireland 6–0 in the final.

Results

Summaries

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up Third place Score Fourth place
1974
Details
Mandelieu, France
Netherlands
1–0
after extra time

Argentina

West Germany
2–0
India
1976
Details
West Berlin, West Germany
West Germany
2–0
Argentina

Netherlands
1–0
Belgium
1978
Details
Madrid, Spain
Netherlands
1–0
West Germany

Belgium
0–0
(3–2)
Penalty strokes

Argentina
1981
Details
Buenos Aires, Argentina
West Germany
1–1
(3–1)
Penalty strokes

Netherlands

Soviet Union
5–1
Australia
1983
Details
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Netherlands
4–2
Canada

Australia
3–1
West Germany
1986
Details
Amstelveen, Netherlands
Netherlands
3–0
West Germany

Canada
3–2
after extra time

New Zealand
1990
Details
Sydney, Australia
Netherlands
3–1
Australia

South Korea
3–2
England
1994
Details
Dublin, Ireland
Australia
2–0
Argentina

United States
2–1
Germany
1998
Details
Utrecht, Netherlands
Australia
3–2
Netherlands

Germany
3–2
Argentina
2002
Details
Perth, Australia
Argentina
1–1
(4–3)
Penalty strokes

Netherlands

China
2–0
Australia
2006
Details
Madrid, Spain
Netherlands
3–1
Australia

Argentina
5–0
Spain
2010
Details
Rosario, Argentina
Argentina
3–1
Netherlands

England
2–0
Germany
2014
Details
The Hague, Netherlands
Netherlands
2–0
Australia

Argentina
2–1
United States
2018
Details
London, England
Netherlands
6–0
Ireland

Spain
3–1
Australia

Successful national teams

Team Titles Runners-up Third places Fourth places
 Netherlands 8 (1974, 1978, 1983, 1986*, 1990, 2006, 2014*, 2018) 4 (1981, 1998*, 2002, 2010) 1 (1976)
 Argentina 2 (2002, 2010*) 3 (1974, 1976, 1994) 3 (1978, 2006, 2014) 1 (1998)
 Australia 2 (1994, 1998) 3 (1990*, 2006, 2014) 1 (1983) 4 (1981, 2002*, 2018)
 Germany^ 2 (1976*, 1981) 2 (1978, 1986) 2 (1974, 1998) 3 (1983, 1994, 2010)
 Canada 1 (1983) 1 (1986)
 Ireland 1 (2018)
 Belgium 1 (1978) 1 (1976)
 United States 1 (1994) 1 (2014)
 England 1 (2010) 1 (1990)
 Spain 1 (2018) 1 (2006*)
 Soviet Union# 1 (1981)
 South Korea 1 (1990)
 China 1 (2002)
 India 1 (1974)
 New Zealand 1 (1986)
* = host nation
^ = includes results representing West Germany between 1974 and 1990
# = states that have since split into two or more independent nations

Performance by continental zones

Continent Best performance
Europe 10 titles, won by the Netherlands (8) and Germany (2)
America 2 titles, won by Argentina
Oceania 2 titles, won by Australia
Asia Third place (Korea, 1990 and China, 2002)
Africa Seventh place (South Africa, 1998)

Team appearances

Team
1974

1976

1978

1981

1983

1986

1990

1994

1998

2002

2006

2010

2014

2018
Total
 Argentina 2nd2nd3rd6th9th7th9th2nd4th1st3rd1st3rd6th14
 Australia 4th3rd6th2nd1st1st4th2nd5th2nd4th11
 Austria 8th9th12th3
 Belgium 5th4th3rd8th12th10th6
 Canada 5th5th2nd3rd10th10th6
 Czechoslovakia# 9thDefunct1
 China 6th7th11th3rd10th8th6th16th8
 England 5th5th4th9th9th5th7th3rd11th7th10
 France 7th6th9th3
 Germany^ 3rd1st2nd1st4th2nd8th4th3rd7th8th4th8th5th14
 India 4th7th11th12th11th9th8th7
 Ireland 12th11th15th2nd4
 Italy 10th9th2
 Japan 6th7th11th10th5th11th10th13th8
 Mexico 10th7th11th3
 Netherlands 1st3rd1st2nd1st1st1st6th2nd2nd1st2nd1st1st14
 New Zealand 7th4th7th6th11th7th5th11th8
 Nigeria 11th10th2
 Russia Part of the Soviet Union12th16th2
 Scotland 8th10th10th12th4
 South Africa 7th13th12th10th9th15th6
 South Korea 3rd5th5th6th9th6th7th12th8
 Soviet Union# 3rd10th8thDefunct3
 Spain 6th5th8th10th11th5th8th8th4th12th3rd11
  Switzerland 9th8th2
 Ukraine Part of the Soviet Union14th1
 United States 6th9th12th3rd8th9th6th4th14th9
 Wales 12th1
Total1011101212121212121612121216171
^ = includes results representing West Germany between 1974 and 1990
# = states that have since split into two or more independent nations

Debut of teams

Year Debutants Total
1974  Argentina,  Austria,  Belgium,  France,  India,  Mexico,  Netherlands,  Spain,   Switzerland,  West Germany^ 10
1976  Italy,  Nigeria 2
1978  Canada,  Czechoslovakia*,  Japan 3
1981  Australia,  Soviet Union* 2
1983  England,  New Zealand,  Scotland,  United States,  Wales 5
1986  Ireland 1
1990  China,  South Korea 2
1994  Germany^,  Russia# 1 (+1)
1998  South Africa 1
2002  Ukraine# 1
2006 0
2010 0
2014 0
2018 0
Total 28 (+1^)
* = Defunct Team
# = Part of Soviet Union (1974–1990)
^ = Germany is official successor of West Germany

Argentina, Germany and the Netherlands are the only teams to have competed at each World Cup; 28 teams have competed in at least one World Cup.

References

  1. "World Cup field to expand to 16 teams in 2018". FIH. 2012-11-01. Retrieved 2012-11-03.
  2. "Vitality Hockey Women's World Cup London 2018". FIH. Retrieved 5 August 2018.
This article is issued from Wikipedia. The text is licensed under Creative Commons - Attribution - Sharealike. Additional terms may apply for the media files.