WNTD

WNTD
City Chicago, Illinois
Broadcast area Chicago market
Branding Relevant Radio
Frequency 950 kHz
First air date April 7, 1922 (date first licensed)[1]
Format Catholic Teaching
Power 1,000 watts (day)
5,000 watts (night)
Class B
Transmitter coordinates 41°51′39″N 87°41′12″W / 41.86083°N 87.68667°W / 41.86083; -87.68667 (day)
41°38′12″N 87°33′10″W / 41.63667°N 87.55278°W / 41.63667; -87.55278 (night)
Former callsigns WAAF (1922-1967)[1]
WGRT (1967-1973)
WJPC (1973[1]-1994)[2]
WEJM (1994-1997)[2]
WIDB (1997-1999)[2]
Affiliations Relevant Radio
Owner Starboard Media Foundation
(Starboard Media Foundation, Inc.)
Sister stations WKBM, WWCA
Webcast Listen Live
Website https://relevantradio.com

WNTD is an AM radio station in Chicago, Illinois. It is owned by Starboard Media Foundation, Inc. Its frequency is 950 AM and has separate day-time (1000 watts; non-directional) and night-time (5000 watts; directional) transmitter locations. It is currently one of three stations in the Chicago market that airs Relevant Radio, a Catholic talk format, 24 hours a day.[3]

History

WAAF

The station was licensed by the FCC on April 7, 1922.[1] It was one of the first radio stations licensed. It was owned by the Chicago Daily Drover's Journal, with its transmitter and studios at the Union Stock Yards.[4][1][5] Its original call letters were WAAF.[4][1] The station originally broadcast at 620 and 830 kHz.[6][7] By 1923, the station's frequency had been changed to 1050 kHz.[8][9] By 1925 the station was broadcasting at 1080 kHz, running 200 watts.[10][11] By 1927, the station's power had been increased to 500 watts, and the station's frequency was changed to 770 kHz.[1] In 1928, the station's frequency was changed to 920 kHz.[1] The station operated during daytime hours only.[1]

The station's programming was initially devoted to trade news, but in 1929, its programming was broadened.[5] The station would air a variety of music programs, along with news, live market reports, and a variety of other programs.[12][13]

The station's transmitter and studios were destroyed in the 1934 Stock Yards fire.[5][1] The station broadcast live coverage of the fire until smoke and heat forced them to leave the building.[5] The station's studios were moved to the Palmer House following the fire.[5][1]

In 1936, the station's power was increased to 1,000 watts.[1] In 1941, the station's frequency was changed to 950 kHz.[1] In the 1940s, the station aired orchestral music and popular music.[4] In 1948, the station's studios were moved to the LaSalle-Wacker Building.[14][5][1]

In the mid 1950s, the station's format was changed from classical music to jazz.[15] Personalities heard on the station during its jazz years included Marty Faye, Daddy-O Daylie, Olympic gold medalist Jesse Owens, and Dick Buckley.[15][16][17]

WGRT

In 1967, the station was sold to a corporation formed by Ralph Atlass, for $900,000.[18][1] The station's call sign was changed to WGRT ("W-Great!") and it adopted a soul music format.[19] Daddy-O Daylie continued as a DJ on WGRT, hosting a morning jazz program.[20][21] Daylie's jazz program was initially two hours long, but was reduced to an hour and a half, and eventually a half hour in 1971.[20][21]

WJPC

On May 29, 1973, the station was purchased by Johnson Publishing Company for $1,800,000.[22][23] On November 1, 1973, the station's call sign was changed to WJPC.[23] The station aired an urban contemporary format.[24] Disc jockeys included Tom Joyner and LaDonna Tittle.[25] Daddy-O Daylie hosted a Sunday jazz program.[26][25] In 1980, the station began nighttime operations, running 5,000 watts using a directional array.[1][25] In the late 1980s and early 90s the station simulcast the soft urban contemporary format of its sister station 106.3 WLNR in Lansing, Illinois, and was branded "Soft Touch".[27][28][29] At Noon on July 15, 1992, the station began airing an all-rap format.[30][31]

106 Jamz

In 1994, Johnson Publishing sold the station, along with 106.3 WJPC-FM, to Broadcasting Partners for $8 million.[22][32] In June 1994, the station became "106 Jamz", airing an urban contemporary format as a simulcast of 106.3 WJPC-FM.[33][34] The station's call sign was changed to WEJM later that year, with its FM simulcast partner taking the call sign WEJM-FM.[2][35] In spring of 1997, the station was sold to Douglas Broadcasting for $7.5 million.[22][36][37] In June 1997, its FM sister station left the simulcast, adopting an urban gospel format as 106.3 WYBA.[38]

One-on-One Sports

On August 28, 1997, WEJM 950's format was changed to sports, as a One-on-One Sports affiliate.[39][40] Around this time, the station was purchased by One-on-One for $10 million.[22][41] In November 1997, the station's call sign was changed to WIDB.[2] One-On-One was headquartered in suburban Northbrook.[39] The One-on-One Sports affiliation moved to WJKL on March 1, 1999, though the One-on-One Sports format continued to simulcast on WIDB until May 1999.[42][43]

WNTD

In 1999, the station was sold to Radio Unica for $16,750,000.[44] In May 1999, the station began airing a Spanish-language news-talk format as Radio Unica.[42][43][45][46] The station's callsign was changed to WNTD that month.[2] Personalities heard on Radio Unica included Paul Bouche and Dra. Isabel, among others.[47][48] Ricardo Brown was news director.[48][47] In 2004, Multicultural Radio Broadcasting acquired Radio Unica for $150 million.[49]

WNTD was the original affiliate of Air America Radio in Chicago.[50] Program hosts included Al Franken, Randi Rhodes, Janeane Garofalo, Rachel Maddow, Lizz Winstead and Chuck D.[50] The network launched on March 31, 2004.[50] However, these programs ended after two weeks, on April 14, due to a payment dispute between Multicultural Radio Broadcasting, then owner of WNTD, and Air America Radio.[51] On April 15, a judge ruled that Air America had fully paid for airtime on WNTD and ordered Multicultural to broadcast Air America on the station.[52] However, Air America would only continue on the station through the end of the month.[53] WNTD would return to airing a Spanish language format.[54][55][56]

In 2007, the station was sold to Sovereign City Radio for $15 million.[57][58] In October 2007, Relevant Radio began to air from 6 AM to 6 PM weekdays, while brokered Spanish language programming aired the remainder of the time.[58]

From August 2009, until August 14, 2010, WNTD carried "Avenue 950", programmed by Sovereign City Radio Services, which featured an eclectic mix of jazz, blues, standards, and adult contemporary from 6:00 PM to 5:00 AM.[59][60] Relevant Radio continued to air during the remainder of the station's schedule.[60] On August 15, 2010, the station began airing Relevant Radio full time.[60]

In 2014, the station was sold to Starboard Media Foundation, Inc. for $14.4 million.[61] The transaction was consummated on May 2, 2014.[62]

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 History Cards for WNTD, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  3. "WNTD 950 AM Chicago is broadcasting Relevant Radio programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week". Relevant Radio. 2010-08-15. Retrieved 2010-10-11.
  4. 1 2 3 "AM Histories", Broadcasting - Telecasting. October 25, 1948. p. 14. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "1922 - Year Radio's Population Soared", Broadcasting. May 14, 1962. p. 96. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  6. Gernsback, H. (1922) Radio For All. p. 271. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  7. Radio Broadcast. Doubleday, Page, and Co. July 1922. p. 276. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  8. Citizens Radio Call Book: A Complete Radio Cyclopedia. Volume 4, November 4. November 1923. p. 13. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  9. The Wireless Age. November 1923. p. 64. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  10. Radio Progress. August 15, 1925. p. 38. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  11. Citizen's Radio Callbook: A Complete Radio Cyclopedia. Vol. 6. No. 2. Fall 1925. p. 14. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  12. Radio and Amusement Guide. Chicago Edition. Vol. 1, No. 16. Week of February 7-13, 1932. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  13. Radio Guide. Chicago Edition. Week of June 11-17, 1933. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  14. "WAAF: A New Home For Chicago's Oldest Call Letters", Broadcasting - Telecasting. October 25, 1948. p. 15. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  15. 1 2 Paige, Earl. "WAAF: Stock in Yards & Jazz", Billboard. November 19, 1966. p. 36. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  16. "Holmes "Daddy-O" Daylie", Rich Samuels. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  17. "Jesse Owens to Switch Chicago Disc Jockey Spots", Jet. April 21, 1960. p. 58. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  18. Corn Belt Pub. Sells WAAF", Billboard. December 17, 1966. p. 32. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  19. Pruter, Robert (1992). Chicago Soul. University of Illinois Press. p. 17. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  20. 1 2 "Daylie Gets Jazz Program With Media Reps Support", Jet. February 25, 1971. p. 57. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  21. 1 2 "WGRT Specialists' Philosophy", Billboard. February 24, 1968. p. 24. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  22. 1 2 3 4 Duncan, James H. "Major Station Transactions:1970 to 2003", An American Radio Trilogy 1975 to 2004. Volume 1: The Markets. Duncan's American Radio. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  23. 1 2 One Big Change Deserves Another", Ebony. December 1973. p. 10. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  24. Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands Chicago Tribune Magazine. March 4, 1979. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  25. 1 2 3 "Backstage", Ebony. May 1980. p. 22. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  26. "WJPC Hosts Big Bash to Kickoff New Name Change", Jet. November 15, 1973. p. 13. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  27. Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988 & Spring/Summer 1989. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  28. "WLNR FM 106.3", Radio Chicago. Fall 1989. p. 43. Accessed January 4, 2014.
  29. "WLNR FM 106.3", Radio Chicago. p. 54. Spring 1991. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  30. Nelson, Havelock. "Rap and black radio", Billboard. November 28, 1992. p. R-6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  31. "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 9, No. 27. July 8, 1992. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  32. "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11 No. 24. June 15, 1994. p. 6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  33. "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11 No. 25. June 22, 1994. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  34. Heise, Kenan. "Isadore Pink, WEJM Rap Deejay Pinkhouse", Chicago Tribune. November 08, 1996. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  35. Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  36. "Evergreen to Sell 3 Radio Stations for $64.1 Million", The New York Times. April 9, 1997. p. D 4. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  37. Jones, Tim. "Radio Shuffle Continues", Chicago Tribune. April 09, 1997. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  38. "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 22. June 4, 1997. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  39. 1 2 Hirsley, Michael. "Sports Radio Network Muscles Into Mix", Chicago Tribune. August 29, 1997. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  40. "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 35. September 3, 1997. p. 2. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  41. "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 35. September 3, 1997. p. 10. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  42. 1 2 Kirk, Jim. "One-on-one Sports Soon Zero For One On AM" Chicago Tribune. February 24, 1999. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  43. 1 2 "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 16 No. 20. May 19, 1999. p. 2. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  44. "Radio Unica Scores In Chicago With WIOB-AM Buy", Radio & Records. February 26, 2018. p. 6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  45. Lose a pet? Tractor to sell?", Chicago Tribune. March 02, 2003. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  46. The M Street Radio Directory. Ninth Edition. 2000. p. 224. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  47. 1 2 "Radio Unica". Radio Unica. Archived from the original on October 1, 2003. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  48. 1 2 "Radio Unica 2002 Programming Line-up." HispanicAd.com. December 09, 2001. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  49. "MultiCultural Radio Broadcasting Acquires Radio Unica Communications; Merger Will Produce Nation's Largest Group of Asian-Language Radio Stations", Business Wire. February 09, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  50. 1 2 3 "Left wingin' it", Chicago Tribune. March 31, 2004. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  51. Carney, Steve. "Radio Station Owner Silences Air America in L.A., Chicago", Los Angeles Times. April 15, 2004. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  52. Cook, John. "Air America restored in Chicago", Chicago Tribune. April 16, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  53. "Air America Quiet", Chicago Tribune. April 21, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  54. The Radio Book. 2005-2006. p. 190. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  55. The Radio Book. 2006-2007. p. 193. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  56. The Radio Book. 2007-2008. p. 193. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  57. Asset Purchase Agreement, fcc.gov. June 29, 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  58. 1 2 Feder, Robert. "Split Personality", Chicago Sun-Times. October 24, 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  59. "Sovereign City debuts Avenue 950", Radio & Television Business Report. August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  60. 1 2 3 "Timeless Cool/Avenue 950 Is Moving Away", Chicagoland Radio and Media. August 14, 2010. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  61. "Asset Purchase Agreement", fcc.gov. December 18, 2013. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  62. Application Search Details, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
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