Swedish general election, 1964

Swedish general election, 1964

September 20, 1964

All 233 seats to the Second Chamber of the Riksdag
117 seats were needed for a majority

  First party Second party Third party
 
Leader Tage Erlander Bertil Ohlin Gunnar Hedlund
Party Social Democratic People's Centre
Last election 114 40 34
Seats won 113 43 35
Seat change 1 3 1
Popular vote 2,006,923 720,733 559,632
Percentage 47.30% 17.0% 13.2%

  Fourth party Fifth party
 
Leader Gunnar Heckscher C.-H. Hermansson
Party Rightist Communist
Last election 39 5
Seats won 33 8
Seat change 6 3
Popular vote 582,609 221,746
Percentage 13.7% 5.2%

PM before election

Tage Erlander
Social Democratic

Elected PM

Tage Erlander
Social Democratic

General elections were held in Sweden on 20 September 1964.[1] The Swedish Social Democratic Party remained the largest party, winning 113 of the 233 seats in the Second Chamber of the Riksdag.[2] Tage Erlander's Social Democratic government was returned to power.

Results

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Swedish Social Democratic Party2,006,72347.3113–1
People's Party720,73317.043+3
Rightist Party582,60913.733–6
Centre Party559,63213.235+1
Communist Party of Sweden221,7465.28+3
Christian Democratic Unity75,3891.80New
Civic Unity[a]64,8071.51New
Middle Parties[b]13,5570.30New
Other parties3840.000
Invalid/blank votes27,815
Total4,273,595100233+1
Registered voters/turnout5,095,85083.9
Source: Nohlen & Stöver

a Civic Unity was a joint list of the three right-wing parties in Malmö. One of its elected candidates was a member of the Centre Party, but sat as an independent.[2]

b The Middle Parties was a joint list of the Centre Party and People's Party that contested some constituencies.[3]

Popular vote
S
47.27%
FP
16.98%
H
13.72%
C
13.18%
SKP
5.22%
KD
1.78%
Med-Sam
1.52%
Others
0.33%
Parliament seats
S
48.50%
FP
18.45%
C
15.02%
H
14.16%
SKP
3.43%
Med-Sam
0.43%

References

  1. Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1858 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. 1 2 Nohlen & Stöver, p1872
  3. Nohlen & Stöver, p1861
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