Squares in London

Squares have long been a feature of London and come in numerous identifiable forms. The landscaping spectrum of squares stretches from those containing more hardscape constituting town squares (also known as city squares) to those containing planted communal gardens, for which London is a major international exponent, known as garden squares.

A few in the capital of the United Kingdom such as Trafalgar Square were from the outset public open spaces in exactly the same way as other city squares worldwide, typically a plaza, piazza and a platz in Spain, Italy and Germany. Most, however, were garden squares that were originally built as private communal gardens for use by the inhabitants of the surrounding houses. All types of the space are more prevalent in parts of London with high (urban) density. Some of these gardens are now open to the public, while others, for example around Notting Hill, are still fenced and private.

The terminology has been loosely applied for over a century. Some have irregular shape three triangles and pentagon feature among those officially named Square. Approbative and technical studies of garden squares commonly cover equivalent landscaped communal gardens not named as a Square many of which spaces have become small public parks a diversity of descriptive names features at the list of London's "garden squares".

Name and shape

"Square" is a generic term for neat, planned or set aside urban open spaces larger than a verge or pavement overlooked by buildings. In London elements of fields were set aside, a fact reflected in the name of the square London Fields and two later examples: Coram's Fields and Lincoln's Inn Fields. Some are not actually square, or even rectangular. One reason for this is the use of a local nickname for the street, park or garden in question. Another is that some older squares were irregularly shaped to begin with, or lost their original layout due to the city's many transformations, not least following the Great Fire of London and The Blitz.

The street naming (or streetnaming) authority of each London Borough and the City of London Corporation by authority of an Act of 1939 imposes rules to authorise appropriate street names for new developments and for owners wishing to rename features.[1] Commercial building and retained historic names apart, new residential squares must in many boroughs be "for a square only" considered not well elongated but rectangular and to some extent open.[2] Billiter Square, EC3 and Millennium Square, SE1 in districts dominated by retail, commerce and offices are among many modern buildings (not beside a visible rectangular open space) which have alternative, higher built density, square features to their design, such as a courtyard or a square footprint.

Some squares are paved (Granary Square); some grass and trees (Russell Square); many others diverse communal gardens. Most of those which are square have the word in their name and these are listed below; others more flexibly identified do not; such notable lists are commonly identified as list of garden squares or "estate gardens", "communal gardens", "formal gardens" about which many books have been written. Increasingly, spaces are being constructed that are legally private, although in practice open to the public (Paternoster Square).

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea contains over a hundred garden squares whose use is restricted to residents. The upkeep of these spaces (almost all named after their adjoining streets for example Square/Crescent/Gardens/Place) is partly paid for through a levy on top of residents' council tax.[3] One instance is a lune, The Boltons.

Toward the public end of the public/private continuum, London's growth has taken in village greens. A minority of these partly or wholly survive such as Newington Green to form council-run open spaces breaking up housing, road networks and/or retail streets. The categories of greens and garden squares become more well-visited scaled up, above an informal cut-off, being the today mainly government-run, characteristic parks and open spaces in London less urban such land includes London's 26 commons most of which were significantly reduced in size in the period of Inclosure and 16 country parks.

History

Development of Squares

The making of residential squares fell into decline in the early 20th century, one of the last notable such squares having been designed by Edwin Lutyens for Hampstead Garden Suburb. Numerous squares were in danger of filling in for further building. This was banned by the London Squares Act of 1931.[4] In the last quarter of the 20th century a fashion for making office squares developed, a trend led by the Broadgate development. Developers such as London Square, Berkeley Homes and Taylor Wimpey (in the first two instances through their London subsidiaries) have built and set aside land in more than one of their 21st century London developments to create those of the residential type.[5][6][7][8][9][10] More broadly, mixed-use squares to give a focal area have become a resurgent planning design, reflected for instance in Times Square, Sutton and Canada Square, Canary Wharf.

Viewings and events in private communal gardens

Since 1998 many private squares (which term in that context takes in many other shapes of gardens between houses) temporarily open to the paying public: London's "Open Garden Squares Weekend", founded by Caroline Aldiss, takes place on the second weekend in June.[11] The event is organised by the London Parks and Garden Trust. In 2013 over 200 gardens took part, including the garden of the Prime Minister at 10 Downing Street and the Gardens of HM Prison Wormwood Scrubs. Other events in keynote squares coincide such as a World Archaeology Festival, Gordon Square, Bloomsbury run by UCL Institute of Archaeology.[12]

The parks can be categorised as public garden squares, private garden squares or other squares.

Social importance

The local proliferation relative to other UK cities coupled with, since the early 20th century, their widespread opening up has similarly made squares broadly cited in portrayals of London. Initially cultural use was mainly confined to novels and, to a lesser degree, fine art.

"It's a Long Way to Tipperary" is a 1910s song featuring the line "Farewell Leicester Square". "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square" is a romantic hit of 1940 with lyrics by Eric Maschwitz and music by Manning Sherwin, sang that year separately by Ray Noble and Vera Lynn and a theme of a film the next year, by Fritz Lang., Man Hunt. In the 1956 song "Why Can't The English?" from the musical My Fair Lady, Professor Henry Higgins laments, "Hear them down in Soho Square/Dropping H's everywhere."

Drama most notably includes the high-audience soap opera broadcast by the BBC running since 1985, EastEnders based on a semi-permanent set north of London's border, Albert Square. It had pre-release titles Square Dance, Round the Square, Round the Houses, London Pride and East 8.[14]

Soho Square garden contains a bench that commemorates the singer Kirsty MacColl, who wrote the song "Soho Square" for her album Titanic Days. After her death in 2000, fans bought a memorial bench in her honour, inscribing the lyrics: "One day I'll be waiting there / No empty bench in Soho Square".[15] The Lindisfarne album Elvis Lives On the Moon also includes a song named after that square.[16]

Notable communal gardens surrounded by buildings

Most notable town squares

List of Greater London squares

The tables below state whether each Square is set around an open-air focus. It comprises, only, roads and communal spaces with the word Square. Those marked No may be squares in an unconventional sense a building or complex that has around it a paved or road area / a building with a covered forum and/or atrium or a throwback to when it may have had a communal focus.

Demolished squares are listed in a table at the end of this section.

They are arranged by postcode, see the map below of postcodes.

City (EC)

NamePost districtOpen-to-sky area between buildingsImage
ExchangeEC2Yes
MonkwellEC2Yes
FinsburyEC2Yes
DevonshireEC2Yes
PaternosterEC4Yes
St Helen’sEC3Yes
LudgateEC4No
RelianceEC2No
MarkEC2Yes
Finsbury AvenueEC2Yes
New InnEC2No
TrinityEC3Yes
BreweryEC1Yes
RoseberyEC1No[n 1]
Coldbath
(historically Cold Bath)
EC1Yes
St John’sEC1Yes
MyddeltonEC1Yes
AmericaEC3Yes
AldermanburyEC2Yes
SalisburyEC4Yes
New StEC4Yes
GoughEC4Yes
WaterhouseEC1Yes
KingEC1Yes
NorthamptonEC1Yes
CharterhouseEC1Yes[n 2][17]
WarwickEC4Yes[n 3]
BartholomewEC1No[n 4]
BridgewaterEC2NoA small pre-school playground

City (WC)

NamePost districtOpen-to-sky area between buildingsImage
QueenWC1Yes
NewWC2Yes
Red LionWC1Yes
Gray’s InnWC1Yes
SouthWC1Yes
BloomsburyWC1Yes
RegentWC1Yes
MecklenburghWC1Yes[n 5]
GranvilleWC1Yes
WilmingtonWC1Yes
LloydWC1Yes
BrunswickWC1Yes[n 6]
TorringtonWC1Yes
TavistockWC1Yes
GordonWC1Yes
WoburnWC1Yes
RussellWC1Yes
BedfordWC1Yes
FleetWC1Yes[n 7]
WellsWC1Yes[n 7]
ArgyleWC1Yes

Inner

North and northwest

NamePost districtOpen-to-sky area between buildingsImage
CanonburyN1Yes
UnionN1Yes
ArlingtonN1Yes
ClaremontN1Yes
HoxtonN1Yes
CharlesN1Yes
HighburyN5Yes
EustonNW1Yes
MunsterNW1Yes
ParkNW1Yes
DorsetNW1Yes
BlandfordNW1Yes
CloudesleyN1Yes
John SpencerN1Yes[n 8]
De BeauvoirN1Yes
Old Royal FreeN1Yes
LonsdaleN1Yes
GibsonN1Yes
MilnerN1Yes
BarnsburyN1Yes
AlwyneN1Yes
ThornhillNW1Yes
EdwardN1Yes
TolmersNW1Yes
ChalcotNW1Yes
OakleyNW1Yes
HarringtonNW1Yes
AmpthillNW1Yes
WiltonN1Yes[n 9]
St Mark’sNW1Yes[n 10]
SouthNW11Yes
NorthNW11Yes
LitchfieldNW11Yessame layout as Lucas Square below
LucasNW11Yes
PondN6Yes
CamdenNW1Yes
AndersonN1Yes
PeabodyN1Yes
PackingtonN1Yes
CanalsideN1Yes
Red HouseN1Yes
Northpoint and
Caledonian
NW1No[n 11]
1 HamondN1No[n 12]
TritonNW1No
RochesterNW1No
UhuraN16No

West and southwest

NamePost districtOpen-to-sky area between buildingsImage
BerkeleyW1Yes
GrosvenorW1Yes
BelgraveSW1Yes
ParliamentSW1Yes
FitzroyW1Yes
CavendishW1Yes
ManchesterW1Yes
PortmanW1Yes
MontaguW1Yes
BryanstonW1Yes
SmithSW1Yes[n 13]
Earl’s CourtSW5Yes
RedcliffeSW10Yes
NevernSW5Yes
St George'sSW1Yes
WarwickSW1Yes
EcclestonSW1Yes
VincentSW1Yes
LindsaySW1Yes
DolphinSW1Yes[n 14]
VictoriaSW1Yes
EburySW1Yes
EatonSW1Yes
LowndesSW1Yes
ClevelandW2Yes
MontpelierSW7Yes
TrevorSW7Yes
BromptonSW3Yes
ThurloeSW7Yes
HerefordSW7Yes
OnslowSW7Yes
AdmiralSW10Yes
ColeridgeSW10Yes
AlexanderSW3Yes[n 15]
OvingtonSW3Yes
WellingtonSW3Yes
ChelseaSW3Yes
CarlyleSW3Yes
TedworthSW3Yes
CadoganSW1Yes
MarkhamSW3Yes
SloaneSW1Yes
Duke of YorkSW3No
PaultonsSW3Yes
St Mary’sW2Yes
CambridgeW2Yes
OxfordW2Yes
SheldonW2Yes
LancerW8Yes
RoseSW3Yes[n 16]
ChantryW8Yes[n 17]
St Mary’s or Old EalingW5Yes
KensingtonW8Yes
St AndrewsW11Yes
WesleyW11Yes
MortimerW11Yes
St CharlesW10No
ColvilleW11Yes
PowisW11Yes
OrmeW11Yes
PorchesterW2Yes
PrincesW2Yes
PembridgeW2Yes
LeinsterW2Yes
KatherineW11Yes
NorlandW11Yes
Campden HillW8Yes
EdwardesW8Yes
WycombeW8Yes
RavenscourtW6Yes
St Peter's SquareW6Yes
AshcroftW6Yes
WestcroftW6Yes
Essex Place (Market) Square
Chiswick High Road
W4Yes
Lyric SquareW6Yes
ShutersW14Yes
OrchardW14Yes
VineW14Yes
Audley, South Audley StreetW1No
FranklinW14No[n 18]
FountainSW1No
BrasseySW11No
ChestertonW8No[n 19]
LampeterW6No[n 20]
NottingdaleW11No[n 11]
St EdmundsSW13Yes
GraftonSW4Yes
FennerSW11Yes[n 21]
MonarchSW11Yes
BatterseaSW11Yes
IvorySW11Yes
HeathfieldSW18No
RestorationSW11No
White'sSW4No
PhilpotSW6No
MacaulaySW4Yes
ImperialSW6Yes
HurlinghamSW6Yes
MarryatSW6Yes
Red LionSW18No
HardwicksSW18No

South

NamePostal districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
BrewerySE1Yes
AvondaleSE1Yes
PerkinsSE1Yes
NelsonSE1Yes
St PhilipBattersea, SW8Yes[n 22]
WestSE11Yes
CleaverSE11Yes
BermondseySE16Yes
MerrickSE1Yes
ThorburnSE1Yes
HelsinkiSE16Yes
GatehouseSE1Yes
SurreySE1Yes
ProvidenceSE1Yes
Millennium, Shad ThamesSE1Yes
EdwardSE16Yes
ElizabethSE16Yes
FrederickSE16Yes
HelenaSE16Yes
SophiaSE16Yes
WilliamSE16Yes
New PlaceSE16Yes
LockwoodSE16Yes
MardenSE16Yes
LayardSE16Yes
St Olav’sSE16Yes[18][19]
ReveleySE16Yes[n 18]
GreenacreSE16Yes[n 18]
Great Guildford BusinessSE1No
BergenSE16No
TillettSE16Yes
Graphite, Vauxhall WalkSE11Yes
Cornwall, Kennings WaySW11Yes[n 23]
John ParkerSW11Yes[n 21]
HollidaySW11Yes[n 21]
WeekleySW11Yes[n 21]
WinchesterSE1No
CobaltVauxhall, SW8Yes
AlbertSW8Yes
WalcotSE11Yes[n 24]
St GeorgesSE8Yes[n 25]
Trinity ChurchSE1Yes[n 26]
MontagueSE15Yes
PeabodySE1Yes
SutherlandSE17Yes
PeckhamSE15Yes
GranvilleSE15Yes
YarnfieldSE15Yes
ChoumertSE15Yes
VivianSE15Yes
GalateaSE15Yes
HuguenotSE15
Shard'sSE15No[n 27]
DickensSE1Yes
HamiltonSE1Yes
Fountain GreenSE16Yes
BonningtonSW8Yes
AddingtonSE5Yes
RustSE5Yes
FoxleySW9Yes
NightingaleSW12Yes
LorrimoreSE17Yes
Flat IronSE1No[20]
Gagarin, Southwark StreetSE1No[n 24]
Westminster BusinessSE11No[n 28]

East

NamePost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
ClaptonE5Yes
TredegarE3Yes
CanadaE14Yes
CabotE14Yes
Thomas MoreE1Yes
ChowE8Yes
TimeE8Yes
LeaE3Yes
HornbeamE3Yes
GraylingE2Yes
MurrayE16No[n 29]
PatriotE2No
Bishops, Spitalfields MarketE1Yes
SpitalE1No[n 30]
BartholomewE1Yes
BeaumontE1Yes
CarltonE1Yes
HarpleyE1Yes
AvisE1Yes
SidneyE1Yes
PetticoatE1Yes
ArbourStepney, E1Yes
BrayfordE1Yes[n 31]
RectoryE1Yes
RoyE14Yes[n 32]
YorkE14Yes
CutlersE14Yes[n 33]
St David’sE14Yes[21]
The Mother'sE5Yes[n 18]
ShalborneE9Yes
Silk MillsE9Yes
LeabankE9Yes
OakumE11Yes[n 34]
StonechatE6Yes[n 35]
PartridgeE6Yes[n 35]
Royal VictoriaE16Yes
LampernE2Yes
Old MarketE2Yes
AmbassadorE14Yes[n 36]
St GeorgesE14Yes
Alphabet SquareE3Yes[n 18]
Aqua VistaE3Yes
GuerinE3Yes
St George'sE7No
RegentE3No
Old SchoolE14No
AtholE14No
TorrensE15No
OlympusE5No
SheffieldE3Yes
TrellisE3Yes
Gerry Raffles Square and Theatre SquareE15Yes
LanarkE14Yes
Burrells WharfE14Yes
CapstanE14Yes
Cumberland MillsE14No[n 37]
Torres, Bering and VulcanE14Yes[n 18]
BotanicE14Yes
TransomE14No
ForgeE14Yes
HopewellE14
HymekE14
WarriorE12No
St Luke’sE16No
St Thomas’sE9Yes
Goldsmith’sE2No
IonE2Yes
St Peter’sE2Yes
EvergreenE8Yes
PollardE2Yes
ChantE15No
BarnbyE15No
Market, Chrisp StreetE14Yes
ShawE17Yes
FassettE9Yes
PrimroseE9No
Principal, Chelmer RoadE9No
SuttonE9Yes[n 18]
The Square, High RoadE10Yes
O’LearyE1Yes
EducationE1No
DouthwaiteE1Yes
CorkE1Yes
WellcloseE1Yes
AlbertE15No
MarylandE15No
PortlandE1No[n 37]
TollgateE6No[n 38]
GooseE6No[n 38]
ButterfieldE6No[n 38]
MartineauE1No[n 38]

Outer

East

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
BrandesburyWoodford GreenIG8Yes
RoseburyWoodford GreenIG8Yes
BrackleyWoodford GreenIG6Yes[n 39]
EastburyBarkingIG11Yes
WarringtonDagenhamRM8Yes
The SquareIlfordIG1Yes
The SquareWoodford GreenIG8Yes
NoelDagenhamRM8Yes[n 40]
CaustonDagenhamRM9Yes
ArnettLondonE4Yes
ManorDagenhamRM8No
OsborneDagenhamRM9No
HuntersDagenhamRM9No

West

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
DolphinLondonW4Yes[n 35]
TownfieldHayesUB3Yes
EmeraldSouthallUB2Yes
The SquareUxbridgeUB11Yes
ColeridgeLondonW13Yes[n 18]
HalidaySouthallUB2Yes[n 18]
CubittSouthallUB2Yes[n 18]
ChiswickLondonW4No
DrenonHayesUB3No
TudorHayesUB3No

South West

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
AubynLondonSW15Yes
EmeraldLondonSW15Yes
TolandLondonSW15Yes
VanneckLondonSW15Yes
ChartfieldLondonSW15Yes
BarringerLondonSW17Yes
BevinLondonSW17Yes
PavilionLondonSW17Yes[n 18]
ChapmanLondonSW19Yes
SuttonHounslowTW5Yes
EpsomHounslowTW6Yes
New ChapelFelthamTW13Yes
NewFelthamTW14Yes[n 18]
MarketKingston upon ThamesKT1Yes
SigristKingston upon ThamesKT1Yes[n 18]
TopiaryRichmondTW9Yes
HeronRichmondTW9Yes
CharlotteRichmondTW10Yes
St Andrew’sSurbitonKT6Yes
UpperIsleworthTW7Yes[n 24]
LowerIsleworthTW7Yes
MemorialIsleworthTW7Yes[n 24]
CheritonLondonSW17No
BelvedereLondonSW19No
GeorgeLondonSW19No
RadcliffeLondonSW15No
MagnaLondonSW14No
The SquareRichmondTW9No
MissionBrentfordTW8No
FerryBrentfordTW8No
King GeorgeRichmondTW10No
FleetwoodKingston upon ThamesKT1No
CharterKingston upon ThamesKT1No
ErnestKingston upon ThamesKT1No
RoseberyKingston upon ThamesKT1No
WatersKingston upon ThamesKT1No
AshcombeNew MaldenKT3No[n 37]
St George’sNew MaldenKT3No
St LeonardsSurbitonKT6No
CardingtonHounslowTW4No

South-East

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
RyculffLondonSE3Yes
CollinsLondonSE3Yes
TristanLondonSE3Yes
LebrunLondonSE3Yes
GallusLondonSE3Yes
Queen’s ElmLondonSE3Yes
James ClavellLondonSE18Yes
SchoolLondonSE10Yes
RomanLondonSE28Yes
The GardensLondonSE22Yes
ArpleyLondonSE20Yes
Watermen’sLondonSE20Yes
PalaceLondonSE19Yes
TalismanLondonSE26Yes
EaldhamLondonSE9Yes
ChiswellLondonSE3Yes
BrookLondonSE18No
MortgramitLondonSE18No
ReginaldLondonSE8Yes
CorvetteLondonSE10Yes
GibbsLondonSE19Yes
KingstonLondonSE19Yes
BuryLondonSE19Yes
MontbelleLondonSE19Yes
BeresfordLondonSE18Yes
Les SmithLondonSE18Yes
Old ClemLondonSE18Yes
ArtilleryLondonSE18Yes
PeppermeadLondonSE13Yes
RobertLondonSE13Yes
ArcherLondonSE14Yes
BroadwayBexleyheathDA6Yes
MarketBromleyBR1Yes
St Paul’sBromleyBR2Yes
OregonOrpingtonBR6Yes
AdamsBexleyheathDA6No
GainsboroughBexleyheathDA6No
RegentBelvedereDA17No

North

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
RedLondonN16Yes
ArundelLondonN7Yes
The MarketLondonN9Yes
NorthLondonN9Yes
TophamLondonN17Yes
BrunswickLondonN17Yes
BroadfieldEnfieldEN1Yes
WestbrookCockfostersEN4Yes
CornwallisLondonN19Yes
AlbionLondonE8Yes
ChristinaLondonN4Yes
SchonfeldLondonN16Yes[n 18]
Hamilton, Sandringham GardensLondonN12No
ChaplinLondonN12No

South

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
WhitgiftCroydonCR0Yes
The PavementCroydonCR0Yes
TorringtonCroydonCR0Yes
RathboneCroydonCR0Yes
KennetMitchenCR4Yes
BerkshireMitchamCR4Yes
CharlwoodMitchamCR4Yes
GlebeMitchamCR4Yes
BovingdonMitchamCR4Yes
AppletonMitchamSM3Yes
StanleyCarshaltonSM5Yes
AlexandraMordenSM4Yes
TimesSuttonSM1Yes
WallingtonWallingtonSM6Yes

North west

NamePost townPost districtOpen to air communal spaceImage
ChelmsfordLondonNW4Yes
St Leonard’sLondonNW5Yes
SeatonLondonNW7Yes
SentinelLondonNW4Yes
CentralLondonNW11Yes
BelsizeLondonNW3Yes
HampdenLondonN14Yes
CentralWembleyHA9Yes
ElliottLondonNW3No
New EndLondonNW3No
The MountLondonNW3No

Demolished

  • Angel Square, EC1
  • Billiter Square, EC3

See also

Notes and References

Notes
  1. a C-shaped building with a raised terrace occupying the void
  2. A pentagon. One actual square is directly north and commonly confused by map makers, the Green. Nine courtyards which are smaller than both exist e.g. Preacher's Court, Pensioners Court, Masters Court which are mostly green.
  3. A tree on a central verge then a side yard with relatively large surface car park for the City of London
  4. Bartholomew Court of the Redbrick Estate mirrors it closely, save its north side remains (nos 20-28, three buildings).
  5. Forms the east of Coram’s Fields
  6. Forms the west of Coram’s Fields
  7. 1 2 Smaller than large communal courtyards in the same estate
  8. Set around two greens
  9. The outer sides form four lines, one very short; the inner sides i.e. the communal gardens are a rounded triangle
  10. St Mark’s Square: narrowly the bulk is a church if excluding two sections of road (which surrounds)
  11. 1 2 Recesses in a building’s front (car parks in indents) are marked no for ease of reference.
  12. Block of flats with smaller garden to rear
  13. Half of Smith Square is a church if excluding the circular road with five exits surrounding
  14. More than 1000 homes adjoin and have this address
  15. Alexander Square is on one side trees to the back of houses on Egerton Crescent (the only square is conceived taking in Brompton Road), has three minor roads around the other sides of its thin strip of green divided in two by another minor road
  16. Most of the gardens are to the side rather than central at Rose Square, a former hospital, Fulham Road, Chelsea, London
  17. Chantry Square is set around a small circle with a semi-circular hedge
  18. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Car park with trees
  19. Chesterton Square is a large courtyard of a large civic/social housing building
  20. South part has a courtyard used for parking and small shrubbery
  21. 1 2 3 4 Weekley Sq has two mature trees along a hedge with a small shrubbery, it is otherwise a parking lot. The four squares in SW11 are identical to neighbouring Carmichael Close.
  22. Half of St Philip Square is the Church of St Philip with St Bartholomew
  23. Cornwall Square is divided by fences among the owners.
  24. 1 2 3 4 Triangular
  25. Bounded by the Thames, a boat repair marina and the roads named Deptford Wharf and Plough Way, St George’s Square in SE8 has no homes or businesses.
  26. Half of Trinity Church Sqaure is Henry Wood Hall, an Arts Organisation which replaced the church.
  27. A narrow asphalted accessway
  28. A non-enclosed small parking court
  29. A street with two right-angles, not a square
  30. A short street, leading past Bishops Square, becoming Lamb Street
  31. A small L-shaped courtyard style space, between clusters of buildings
  32. A long, nearly enclosed by homes, green courtyard
  33. A small courtyard between buildings for parking
  34. Sixty homes under construction
  35. 1 2 3 Lacks fourth side. Car park with trees
  36. A single tree and square layout
  37. 1 2 3 A cross-shaped road with blocks of apartments that have a courtyard; mainly a parking lot.
  38. 1 2 3 4 Part of a road with a slight kink
  39. Mostly fenced gardens; has a large, railed end verge centred on shrubs
  40. Crossed by two roads and bounded by another
References
  1. London Buildings Acts (Amendment) Act 1939, Part 2: Naming and Numbering of Streets and Buildings.
  2. Street Naming application pack Example policy list from Kensington and Chelsea, replacing similar earlier rule. Retrieved 2018-03-12
  3. "Your garden square and you" Archived 2006-07-11 at the Wayback Machine., Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London, UK. URL accessed 20 June 2006.
  4. Camilla Phelps, "London opens its gates". The English Garden, June 2013, 97.
  5. "Square" Details of 21st century square, at Farm Lane, Fulham, London Square Group, 2018
  6. "Square"" Details of 21st century square at Waldegrave Road, Teddington, London Square Group, 2018
  7. "Brunswick Square, Orpington" Berkeley Homes Group, 2018
  8. "Royal Warwick Square, Kensington", Berkeley Homes Group, 2018
  9. "St George's Square, Sudbury Hill, Harrow" Taylor Wimpey, 2018
  10. "Tolworth Square, Surbiton" Taylor Wimpey, 2018
  11. Phelps, "London opens its gates". The English Garden, June 2013, 95–98.
  12. "World Archaeology Festival 2013", UCL.
  13. "Cédric Le Borgne: Was That a Dream?". visitlondon.com.
  14. Smith, Rupert (2005). EastEnders: 20 Years in Albert Square (Hardback). BBC Books. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-563-52165-5.
  15. "Bench in Soho Square". Kirsty MacColl. 2001-08-12. Retrieved 2011-02-03.
  16. http://www.lindisfarne.co.uk/discography/elvis-lives-on-the-moon.htm
  17. Historic England. "lamp post in Pensioners Court (1206699)". National Heritage List for England.
  18. Historic England. "Archway to Rotherhithe Tunnel Approach (1385848)". National Heritage List for England.
  19. Historic England. "Rotherhithe (Norwegian Seamen) War Memorial (1449959)". National Heritage List for England.
  20. Flat Iron Square at Google Maps; a street food market which was once a large parking lot, between Southwark St and Union St.
  21. Three squares opening out onto the Thames
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