South Tyrolean dialect

South Tyrolean German (German: Südtirolerisch or Südtirolisch, in the local Upper German (Austro-Bavarian) vernacular also referred to as Südtiroulerisch oSîdtiroul(er)isch) is a dialect spoken in the northern Italian province of South Tyrol. It is generally considered to be a local variant of Southern Bavarian.[1] The difference between Bavarian and South Tyrolean is the heavy influence of Italian (and Ladin) in its lexicon .

Characteristics

69.15% of the inhabitants of South Tyrol speak German as their mother tongue.[2] South Tyrolean tends to be used at home or in informal situations, while standard German in its Austrian variant prevails at school, work and for official purposes. As such, this medial diglossia, since the spoken language is mainly the dialect, whereas the written language is mainly the Austrian German variety of Standard German.[1]

The South Tyrolean dialect is related to Bairisch. It preserves its specific traits and is basically homogeneous with Northern Tyrolean variants. It absorbed some Italian or Italian-based terms, especially for administrative purposes (for example, driving license, General Practitioner, etc.) and some types of food. These terms are seldom present in Standard German or Austrian German.

Vocabulary[3]

South Tyrolean Standard German Italian English
oftamol manchmal talvolta sometimes
lousn hören udire listen
Magari Vielleicht/Etwa Magari maybe
Fraktion Ortsteil Frazione Hamlet
Kondominium Mehrfamilienhaus Condominio Condominium/condo
Rutschelen[4] Locken Riccioli Curls
Advokat[4] Rechtsanwalt Avvocato Lawyer, Attorney
Identitätskarte Personalausweis Carta d'identità ID card
kegser[5] Nervensäge Rompiscatole Nag

References

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