Self-coup

A self-coup (or autocoup, from the Spanish autogolpe) is a form of putsch or coup d'état in which a nation's leader, despite having come to power through legal means, dissolves or renders powerless the national legislature and unlawfully assumes extraordinary powers not granted under normal circumstances. Other measures taken may include annulling the nation's constitution, suspending civil courts and having the head of government assume dictatorial powers.[1]

List of self-coups

References

  1. An early reference to the term autogolpe may be found in Kaufman, Edy: Uruguay in Transition: From Civilian to Military Rule, Transaction, New Brunswick, 1979. It includes a definition of autogolpe and mentions that the word was "popularly" used in reference to events in Uruguay in 1972–1973. See Uruguay in Transition: From Civilian to Military Rule - Edy Kaufman at Google Books.
  2. "Declaration of Martial Law". Official Gazette. Republic of the Philippines. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  3. "Venezuela Muzzles Legislature, Moving Closer to One-Man Rule". New York Times. New York Times. Retrieved March 31, 2017.
  4. "Venezuela's high court dissolves National Assembly". CNN. CNN. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
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