Palatal lateral ejective affricate

Palatal lateral ejective affricate
cʎ̝̊ʼ
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The palatal lateral ejective affricate is a rare type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is c͡ʎ̝̊ʼ.

It is a rare sound, found in Dahalo, a Cushitic language of Kenya, and in Hadza, a language isolate of Tanzania. In Dahalo, /c͡ʎ̥̝ʼ/ contrasts with alveolar /tɬʼ/, and in Hadza it contrasts with velar [k͡ʟ̝̊ʼ], an allophone of /kʼ/.

Features

Features of the palatal lateral ejective affricate:

  • Its manner of articulation is affricate, which means it is produced by first stopping the airflow entirely, then allowing air flow through a constricted channel at the place of articulation, causing turbulence.
  • Its phonation is voiceless, which means it is produced without vibrations of the vocal cords.
  • It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth only.
  • It is a lateral consonant, which means it is produced by directing the airstream over the sides of the tongue, rather than down the middle.

Occurrence

LanguageWordIPAMeaning
Dahalo[1][ʔacʎ̝̊ʼáno]'semen'
Hadza[2][mitcʎ̝̊ʼa]'bone'

The Hadza sound has been transcribed as [t͡ʎ̥̝ʼ], but alveolar contact of the tongue is not distinctive.

Notes

References

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