PBC CSKA Moscow

CSKA Moscow
Nickname Армейцы (Red Army)
Кони (Horses)
Красно-синие (Red-Blue)
Leagues VTB United League
EuroLeague
Founded April 23, 1923 (1923-04-23)
History PBC CSKA Moscow
(1923–present)
Arena Universal Sports Hall CSKA
(capacity: 5,500)
Megasport Arena
(capacity: 13,344)
Location Moscow, Russia
Team colors Red, Blue
         
Main sponsor Norilsk Nickel
President Andrey Vatutin
Head coach Dimitrios Itoudis
Team captain Victor Khryapa
Affiliation(s) CSKA Junior
Championships 7 EuroLeague
24 Soviet Championships
25 Russian Championships
4 Russian Cups
3 Soviet Cups
1 North European League
9 VTB United Leagues
Website cskabasket.com
Uniforms
Third

PBC CSKA Moscow[1] (Russian: ПБК ЦСКА Москва) is a Russian professional basketball team based in Moscow, Russia. The club is a member of the VTB United League and the EuroLeague. CSKA won two titles between 2006 and 2008, in Europe's principal club competition, the EuroLeague, making the final in all four seasons, and has advanced to the EuroLeague Final Four 16 times in the 21st century.[2]

CSKA is dominating in VTB United League, winning all but one titles up-to-date. With 7 EuroLeague championships, one NEBL championship, 49 home league championships, 7 home cups and 9 VTB United League titles in total, CSKA is the most successful basketball team in Russia (former Soviet Union), and is also one of the most successful basketball teams in Europe.

In Euroleague in 2006 CSKA won its first title in a long time, defeating Maccabi 73-69 in the final in Prague. Next year the team lost in the 2007 final 93–91 to Panathinaikos on the Greens' home floor, the Nikos Galis Olympic Indoor Hall in Athens. In 2008, they won a rematch of the 2006 final against Maccabi 91–77 in Madrid. In 2009, they lost a rematch of the 2007 final against Panathinaikos 73–71 in Berlin. The club competed in 8 consecutive EuroLeague Final Fours from 2003 to 2010, which is an all-time record. CSKA won its last up-to-date title in 2016, after beating Fenerbahçe in the final, by a score of 101–96, in overtime.[3]

Well-known players that have played for the club over the years include: Sergei Belov, Gennadi Volnov, Viktor Zubkov, Yuri Korneev, Vladimir Andreev, Anatoly Myshkin, Stanislav Yeryomin, Ivan Edeshko, Alzhan Zharmukhamedov, Sergei Tarakanov, Rimas Kurtinaitis, Vladimir Tkachenko, Sergei Bazarevich, Sasha Volkov, Andrei Kirilenko, Trajan Langdon, Darius Songaila, Gordan Giriček, Dragan Tarlać, Marcus Brown, Ramūnas Šiškauskas, Theo Papaloukas, Nenad Krstić, Miloš Teodosić, and Nando de Colo. Also, Alexander Gomelsky, the legendary basketball coach, worked in CSKA for nearly 20 years, turning it into a powerhouse. Nowadays, CSKA has the reputation for being one of the richest sports clubs in Europe, having been previously owned by Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov,[4][5] and being currently owned by Norilsk Nickel.[2]

History

1923–1991

CSKA was founded on 29 April 1923,[6] then known as OPPV,[7] when on that day soldiers and sportsmen fought in football against each other for the first place of Moscow. "OPPV", which means Опытно-показательная военно-спортивная площадка всевобуча, a department in the General military education service, was the first central sports department of the Red Army. It was based on the pre-revolutionary "Community of Amateur Skiers".[6]

The first success of the basketball department came at the 1924 Soviet League championship, which was played between cities, not clubs. Two more titles followed in 1928 and 1935. In 1938, the Soviet League championship was played between clubs, and CSKA under the name CDKA (Центральный дом Красной Армии, Central House of the Red Army) debuted there. Stalin's son, Vasily, then founded the club VVS MVO (Военно-Воздушные Силы Московского Военного Округа), with CDKA merging with it. By the end of the Great Patriotic War, CSKA established itself as one of the most respected Soviet basketball teams.[6]

In 1953 and 1954, the club was renamed CDSA (Центральный дом Советской Армии, Central House of the Soviet Army), between 1955–60, it was known as CSK MO, and finally in 1960, it received its current name CSKA (Центральный спортивный клуб Армии, Central Sports Club of the Army).[6]

CSKA won the FIBA European Champions Cup (now called EuroLeague) title, in 1961, 1963, 1969, and 1971. They also won the Soviet League championship 24 times (1945, 1960–1962, 1964–1966, 1969–1974, 1976–1984, 1988, and 1990).

1992–2008

CSKA won the Russian League title, every year from 1992, through 2000, and every year from 2003 to 2008. CSKA also made the 1996 EuroLeague Final Four. They also made the 2001 SuproLeague Final Four, the 2003 EuroLeague Final Four, the 2004 EuroLeague Final Four, and the 2005 EuroLeague Final Four, before finally winning the EuroLeague championship at the 2006 EuroLeague Final Four.

In the 2004–05 season, the team became the first in the history of the EuroLeague to go through the regular-season phase undefeated, during the 2004–05 EuroLeague season, and before the 2005 EuroLeague Final Four, it had only lost to one team: FC Barcelona. Though CSKA eventually lost in the semifinals on their home court to Spanish League club TAU Cerámica, and to Panathinaikos, of the Greek League, in the third-place game. That sent them to the 2nd grade teams in the EuroLeague draw, although they finished the league with the best record. That same year they also lost a game in the finals series of the Russian League, but they eventually got the Russian League crown.

In 2006, CSKA qualified for the 2004–05 EuroLeague Top 16, by finishing third in their group. They finished at the top of their Top 16 group, being denied a perfect record at Tau, in their final game. CSKA entered the 2006 EuroLeague Final Four on a roll, as the only club to sweep their best-of-three quarterfinal series, by defeating Turkish Super League power Efes Pilsen. They defeated Barça in the EuroLeague semis, before defeating the high-powered offense of Maccabi Tel Aviv, of the Israeli Super League, in the final, on April 30, even though the overall record of Maccabi's games with CSKA Moscow favored the Israeli club.

The following year, they nearly repeated as EuroLeague champions, but wound up facing Panathinaikos in the final, on the Greek team's home floor, OAKA Indoor Hall, which had been designated more than a year earlier as the site for that year's Final Four. Panathinaikos won a closely fought battle. In 2008, their EuroLeague championship win at the 2008 EuroLeague Final Four, put them in sole possession of second place for overall top-tier level European-wide titles. Only Real Madrid, with eight titles (ten now), had won more than CSKA's six titles at the time (and seven now). On October 14, 2008, the team played an NBA preseason game against the Toronto Raptors, at Air Canada Centre, in Toronto.

2009–present

CSKA won the Russian League title every year from 2009 through 2018, continuing to add to their streak of consecutive Russian League titles won every year since 2003 overall. Since the foundation of the VTB United League in 2008, CSKA has dominated the league, winning the title in 9 of its first 10 seasons, including the league's Promotional Cup in 2008.

In the 2015–16 season, CSKA won its 7th EuroLeague championship. At the Berlin Final Four, CSKA Moscow defeated Fenerbahçe, by a score of 101–96, after overtime.[8] The star player of CSKA was Nando de Colo, who was named both the season EuroLeague MVP, and the EuroLeague Final Four MVP.[9][10]

In 2017-18 season CSKA guaranteed its first place of the regular season, beating Olympiacos at home on March 22 with a score of 89:81. In VTB United League CSKA secured their 9th title after defeating Khimki 95:84 in the 2018 Final Four.

Home arenas

CSKA played all of its home games, both national domestic league games, and European league games, at the 5,500 seat Universal Sports Hall CSKA, from 1979 to 2015. They also played a home EuroLeague game at the 13,344 seat Megasport Arena, on January 23, 2008. Starting with the 2015–16 season, CSKA began regularly playing its home EuroLeague games at Megasport Arena, while still playing at CSKA Universal Sports Hall for VTB United League games.

Players

Current roster

Note: Flags indicate national team eligibility at FIBA sanctioned events. Players may hold other non-FIBA nationality not displayed.

CSKA Moscow roster
PlayersCoaches
Pos.No.Nat.NameHt.Wt.Age
G 1 de Colo, Nando 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 31 – (1987-06-23)23 June 1987
F 5 Peters, Alec 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) 107 kg (236 lb) 23 – (1995-04-13)13 April 1995
G 7 Ukhov, Ivan 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 76 kg (168 lb) 22 – (1995-09-11)11 September 1995
F 11 Antonov, Semyon 2.02 m (6 ft 8 in) 104 kg (229 lb) 29 – (1989-07-18)18 July 1989
PG 13 Rodríguez, Sergio 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 80 kg (176 lb) 32 – (1986-06-12)12 June 1986
PF 20 Vorontsevich, Andrey 2.07 m (6 ft 9 in) 107 kg (236 lb) 31 – (1987-07-17)17 July 1987
F 21 Clyburn, Will 2.01 m (6 ft 7 in) 95 kg (209 lb) 28 – (1990-05-17)17 May 1990
G/F 22 Higgins, Cory 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) 82 kg (181 lb) 29 – (1989-06-14)14 June 1989
G 23 Hackett, Daniel 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 30 – (1987-12-19)19 December 1987
G 30 Kulagin, Mikhail 1.92 m (6 ft 4 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 24 – (1994-08-04)4 August 1994
F 41 Kurbanov, Nikita 2.02 m (6 ft 8 in) 99 kg (218 lb) 31 – (1986-10-05)5 October 1986
C 42 Hines, Kyle 1.98 m (6 ft 6 in) 111 kg (245 lb) 32 – (1986-09-02)2 September 1986
C 44 Hunter, Othello 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in) 107 kg (236 lb) 32 – (1986-05-28)28 May 1986
F/C Bolomboy, Joel 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) 105 kg (231 lb) 24 – (1994-01-28)28 January 1994
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Athletic trainer(s)
  • Kostas Chatzichristos
  • Eugeniy Burin
Physiotherapist(s)
  • Roberts Zirdzins
  • Aleksandar Bata
  • Aleksandr Selyavkin
Team manager
  • Alexander Gugunishvili

Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Injured

Updated: August 8, 2018

Depth chart

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2
C Kyle Hines Othello Hunter Joel Bolomboy
PF Andrey Vorontsevich Alec Peters
SF Will Clyburn Nikita Kurbanov Semyon Antonov
SG Nando de Colo Cory Higgins Ivan Ukhov
PG Sergio Rodríguez Daniel Hackett Mikhail Kulagin

Squad changes for the 2018-2019 season

In

Note: Flags indicate national team, as has been defined under FIBA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIBA nationality.

No. Position Player
G Daniel Hackett (from Brose Bamberg)
F Alec Peters (from Phoenix Suns)
G Ivan Ukhov (from Parma Basket)
C Joel Bolomboy (from Milwaukee Bucks)

Out

Note: Flags indicate national team, as has been defined under FIBA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIBA nationality.

No. Position Player
PF Victor Khryapa (to free agent)
SG Vitaly Fridzon (to Lokomotiv Kuban)
PF Pavel Korobkov (to free agent)
C Alan Makiev (to free agent)
PF Victor Rudd (to free agent)
PG Léo Westermann (to free agent)

On loan

CSKA Moscow players out on loan
Nat. Player Position Team On loan until
Alexander GudumakPF EniseyJune 2018

Honours

Domestic competitions

Winners (24): 1944–45, 1959–60, 1960–61, 1961–62, 1963–64, 1964–65, 1965–66, 1968–69, 1969–70, 1970–71, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1973–74, 1975–76, 1976–77, 1977–78, 1978–79, 1979–80, 1980–81, 1981–82, 1982–83, 1983–84, 1987–88, 1989–90
Runners-up (11): 1945–46, 1950–51, 1952–53, 1953–54, 1954–55, 1956–57, 1957–58, 1974–75, 1984–85, 1985–86, 1986–87
Winners (25): 1992, 1992–93, 1993–94, 1994–95, 1995–96, 1996–97, 1997–98, 1998–99, 1999–00, 2002–03, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2007–08, 2008–09, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18
Winners (9): 2008, 2009–10, 2011–12, 2012–13, 2013–14, 2014–15, 2015–16, 2016–17, 2017–18
Runners-up (1): 2010–11
Winners (3): 1971–72, 1972–73, 1981–82
Winners (4): 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2009–10
Runners-up (3): 2002–03, 2003–04, 2007–08

European competitions

Winners (7): 1960–61, 1962–63, 1968–69, 1970–71, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2015–16
Runners-up (6): 1964–65, 1969–70, 1972–73, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2011–12
Semifinalists (1): 1961–62
3rd place (8): 1965–66, 1976–77, 1995–96, 2003–04, 2009–10, 2012–13, 2014–15, 2016–17
4th place (7): 1982–83, 1984–85, 2000–01, 2002–03, 2004–05, 2013–14, 2017–18
Final Four (18): 1966, 1996, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Semifinalists (2): 1985–86, 1986–87
Semifinalists (1): 1989–90
3rd place (1): 1988

Other competitions

Winners (1): 1998
Winners (7): 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Runners-up (2): 2009, 2017

Regional competitions

Winners (1): 1999–00

Individual club awards

Winners (7): 1971–72, 1972–73, 1981–82, 2004–05, 2005–06, 2006–07, 2009–10
Winners (1): 2005–06

Season by season

Season Tier League Pos. Postseason Cup Competitions
USSR / Russia
European Competitions
USSR / Russia
CDKA
1937–38
1
Premier
12
12th place
1938–39
1
Premier
9
9th place
1939–40
1
Premier
13
13th place
1944–45
1
Premier
1
Champion
1945–46
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1946–47
1
Premier
3
3rd place
1947–48
1
Premier
7
7th place
1948–49
1
Premier
3
3rd place
VVS MVO
1949–50
1
Premier
3
3rd place
1950–51
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1951–52
1
Premier
1952–53
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
CDSA
1953–54
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1954–55
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
CSK MO
1955–56
1
Premier
1956–57
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1957–58
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1958–59
1
Premier
1959–60
1
Premier
1
Champion
CSKA Moscow
1960–61
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueC
1961–62
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueSF
1962–63
1
Premier 1 EuroleagueC
1963–64
1
Premier
1
Champion Withdrew
1964–65
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueRU
1965–66
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 Euroleague3rd
1966–67
1
Premier
1967–68
1
Premier
3
3rd place
1968–69
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueC
1969–70
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueRU
1970–71
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueC
1971–72
1
Premier
1
Champion Champion
1972–73
1
Premier
1
Champion Champion 1 EuroleagueRU
1973–74
1
Premier
1
Champion
1974–75
1
Premier
2
Runner-up
1975–76
1
Premier
1
Champion
1976–77
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueSF
1977–78
1
Premier
1
Champion
1978–79
1
Premier
1
Champion
1979–80
1
Premier
1
Champion
1980–81
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueSF
1981–82
1
Premier
1
Champion Champion 1 EuroleagueEF
1982–83
1
Premier
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueSF
1983–84
1
Premier
1
Champion
1984–85
1
Premier
2
Runner-up 1 EuroleagueSF
1985–86
1
Premier
2
Runner-up 2 Saporta CupSF
1986–87
1
Premier
2
Runner-up 2 Saporta CupSF
1987–88
1
Premier
1
Champion
1988–89
1
Premier
3
3rd place 1 EuroleagueEF
1989–90
1
Premier
1
Champion 3 Korać CupSF
1990–91
1
Premier
4
Semifinalist 1 EuroleagueT16
1991–92
1
Premier
1
Champion
1992–93
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 2 Saporta CupQF
1993–94
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueGS
1994–95
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueEF
1995–96
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeague3rd
1996–97
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueGS
1997–98
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueEF
1998–99
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueT16
1999–00
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 1 EuroLeagueT16
2000–01
1
Superliga A
4
4th place 1 SuproLeagueSF
2001–02
1
Superliga A
4
5th place 1 EuroleagueEF
2002–03
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Runner-up 1 EuroleagueSF
2003–04
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Runner-up 1 Euroleague3rd
2004–05
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Champion 1 EuroleagueSF
2005–06
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Champion 1 EuroleagueC
2006–07
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Champion 1 EuroleagueRU
2007–08
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Runner-up 1 EuroleagueC
2008–09
1
Superliga A
1
Champion 3rd place 1 EuroleagueRU
2009–10
1
Superliga A
1
Champion Champion 1 Euroleague3rd
2010–11
1
PBL
2
Champion 1 EuroleagueGS
2011–12
1
PBL
1
Champion 1 EuroleagueRU
2012–13
1
PBL
2
Champion 1 Euroleague3rd
2013–14
1
United League
2
Champion Quarterfinalist 1 EuroleagueSF
2014–15
1
United League
1
Champion First round 1 Euroleague3rd
2015–16
1
United League
1
Champion First round 1 EuroleagueC
2016–17
1
United League
1
Champion Eighthfinals 1 EuroLeague3rd
2017–18
1
United League
1
Champion First round 1 EuroLeagueSF

Notable players

Note: Flags indicate national team eligibility at FIBA sanctioned events. Players may hold other non-FIBA nationality not displayed.

Head coaches

Matches against NBA teams

October 7, 2006
Los Angeles Clippers 7594 CSKA Moscow
October 11, 2006
Philadelphia 76ers 8571 CSKA Moscow
October 10, 2008
Orlando Magic 9466 CSKA Moscow
October 14, 2008
Toronto Raptors 8678 CSKA Moscow
October 12, 2010
Miami Heat 9685 CSKA Moscow
October 14, 2010
Oklahoma City Thunder 9789 CSKA Moscow
October 16, 2010
Cleveland Cavaliers 8790 CSKA Moscow
7 October 2013
Minnesota Timberwolves 106108 CSKA Moscow
9 October 2013
San Antonio Spurs 9593 CSKA Moscow

References

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