Montenegrins of Serbia

Montenegrins of Serbia
Crnogorci u Srbiji
Црногорци у Србији
Flag of the National Council of the Montenegrin Minority in Serbia
Total population
38,527 (2011)
Regions with significant populations
 Vojvodina 22,141 (1.15%)
Belgrade 9,902
Languages
Montenegrin[1] and Serbian
Religion
Orthodox Christians
Related ethnic groups
Serbs

The Montenegrins of Serbia (Montenegrin and Serbian: Crnogorci u Srbiji / Црногорци у Србији) are a national minority in the country. According to the 2011 census, there are 38,527[2] ethnic Montenegrins in Serbia. They are the sixth largest ethnic community in the Vojvodina province.

Geography

The largest concentration of Montenegrins in Vojvodina could be found in the municipalities of Vrbas (24.79%), Mali Iđoš (20.83%), and Kula (16.34%). Settlements in Vojvodina with absolute or relative Montenegrin majority are: Lovćenac in the Mali Iđoš municipality with 56.86% Montenegrins, Kruščić in the Kula municipality with 32.64% Montenegrins, and Savino Selo in the Vrbas municipality with 38.20% Montenegrins. Formerly, the village of Bačko Dobro Polje in the Vrbas municipality also had a Montenegrin majority (According to the 1971 census, Montenegrins comprised 55.39% of population of this village, while according to the 2002 census, the current population of the village is composed of 57.17% Serbs and 38.18% Montenegrins).

Demographics

Year Montenegrins %
194874,8601.15%
195386,0611.23%
1961104,7531.37%
1971125,2601.48%
1981147,4661.58%
1991139,2991.42%
1991 (excl. Kosovo)118,9341.52%
2002 (excl. Kosovo)69,0490.92%
2011 (excl. Kosovo)38,5270.5%

In Vojvodina, the number of Montenegrins, according to 1948-2011 censuses: 1948: 30,589 (1.9%); 1953: 30,516 (1.8%); 1961: 34,782 (1.9%); 1971: 36,416 (1.9%); 1981: 43,304 (2.1%); 1991: 47,289 (2.3%); 2002: 35,513 (1.75%); 2011: 22,141 (1.15%).

Culture

Montenegrins in Serbia speak Serbian or Montenegrin and the vast majority are adherents of the Serbian Orthodox Church. The society of Montenegrins in Serbia, known as "Krstaš", is based in Lovćenac. Montenegrin language was recognised as minority language in official use in Mali Iđoš.[3]

Notable people

See also

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Sources

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