List of wine-producing countries

The following is a list of the top wine-producing countries and their volume of wine production for the year 2014 in metric tonnes, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), which is an agency of the United Nations; this is the latest information available from the FAO.

Their data show a total worldwide production of 31 million tonnes (1,000 kg) of wine (which roughly corresponds to 1,000 l) with the top 15 producing countries accounting for over 90% of the total.[1]

Wine production by country in 2014
RankCountry
(with link to wine article)
Production
(tonnes)
1 Italy4,796,600
2 Spain4,607,850
3 France4,293,466
4 United States3,300,000
5 China1,700,000
6 Argentina1,498,380
7 Chile1,214,000
8 Australia1,186,343
9 South Africa1,146,006
10 Germany920,200
11 Portugal603,327
12 Romania378,283
13 Greece334,300
14 Russia327,400
15 New Zealand320,400
16 Brazil273,100
17 Hungary258,520
18 Austria199,869
19 Serbia198,183
20 Moldova149,850
21 Bulgaria130,500
22 Georgia108,600
23 Switzerland93,365
24 Ukraine86,904
25 Japan85,000
26 Peru73,000
27 Uruguay72,500
28 Canada54,663
29 Algeria52,000
30 Czech Republic52,000
31 Macedonia51,013
32 Croatia45,272
33 Turkey44,707
34 Mexico39,360
35 Turkmenistan39,000
36 Morocco37,000
37 Uzbekistan36,000
38 Slovakia32,527
39 Belarus29,980
40 Kazakhstan21,993
41 Tunisia21,500
42 Albania24,000
43 Montenegro16,000
44 Lebanon14,700
45 Slovenia13,229
46 Colombia13,000
47 Luxembourg12,494
48 Cuba12,080
49 Estonia11,104
50 Cyprus10,302
51 Azerbaijan9,512
52 Bolivia9,422
53 Madagascar8,350
54 Bosnia and Herzegovina7,524
55 Armenia6,174
56 Lithuania6,005
57 Egypt5,000
58 Israel5,000
59 Belgium2,900
60 Latvia2,450
61 Malta2,426
62 Zimbabwe1,750
63 Kyrgyzstan1,700
64 Paraguay1,500
65 Ethiopia1,297
66 Jordan550
67 United Kingdom425
68 Panama159
69 Tajikistan150
70 Liechtenstein79
71 Syria70
72 Reunion30

References

  1. "Wine production (tons)". Food and Agriculture Organization. 6 October 2015. p. 1. Retrieved 8 October 2015.
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