List of middle schools in England

Middle schools in England are defined in English and Welsh law as being schools in which the age range of pupils taught includes pupils who are aged below 10 years and six months, as well as those who are aged over 12.[1]

The number of middle schools, including combined schools for children aged between 5 and 12, reached a peak of over 1400 by 1983.[2] In 2018 there were 114 middle schools remaining in England, operating in just 14 local authority areas.

History

Middle schools were permitted by the Education Act of 1964, which made additional arrangements to allow for schools which crossed the traditional primary-secondary threshold at age 11. Notably, these changes did not define a new type of school, but rather permitted a variation on existing schemes, while providing for regulations which allowed the Secretary of State to determine whether such schools should be treated as primary or secondary.[3] This had not been provided for in the Education Act of 1944.[4]

The move, pushed forward by Alec Clegg, then Chief Education Officer of the West Riding of Yorkshire County Council, was initially part of a process to introduce comprehensive schools in secondary education. Clegg proposed a model of middle schools for students aged 9 to 13, crossing the traditional divide at age 11[5] as early as 1960, with the scheme fully implemented in September 1969.[6] Earlier moves by the local authority in Leicestershire had seen the introduction of two-tier secondary schools for students aged 11 to 14, and 14 to 18 as early as the late 1950s.[7]

The 1964 Act was followed in July 1965 by Circular 10/65 from the then Labour government requesting that local education authorities put forward plans to introduce comprehensive schools in their areas. However, the circular offered only limited support for a change to a three-tier model of middle schools, as the minister had already requested a review of the age of transfer to secondary schools as part of the Plowden enquiry into Children and their primary schools.[8][9] The Plowden report published in 1967 encouraged the development of middle schools for students aged 8 to 12, developing from existing junior schools.[10]

The law required that all schools were classified as either primary or secondary depending on the age range of students.[5] By 1970, over 100 middle deemed secondary schools were in operation with around 30 deemed primary schools.[11] The number of middle schools, including combined schools for children aged between 5 and 12, rose continuously over the next decade, reaching a peak of over 1400 such schools by 1983,[2][12] with the primary model rapidly overtaking the secondary following the publication of the Plowden report. However, from that time onwards, the number of middle schools fell each year.

The introduction of the National Curriculum with set Key Stages aligned with the old primary/secondary model further affected the numbers of schools, with a quarter of middle schools closing in the five years after its introduction.[11] Issues of falling rolls, and queries raised about the academic progress of students in three-tier systems led to further closures.[12]

Statistics

In 2018 there were 114 middle schools remaining in England, operating in 14 local authority areas, ranging from the 117-pupil Glendale Middle School in Northumberland, to the 1000-pupil Biggleswade Academy in Biggleswade, Bedfordshire.

In the table below, the URN refers to the unique reference number for each school, linking to its page on the Ofsted website. Also from the table below, it can be seen that middle deemed primary schools have now been almost completely abolished across England.

Middle schools

Bedford Borough

Schools in the unitary authority, operated by Bedfordshire County Council until April 2009. Following consultation in the summer of 2009 the authority intended to re-introduce two-tier provision from 2013, closing all middle schools by 2015.[13] However, on 7 July 2010, it was announced that the change from 3-tier to 2-tier "would be scrapped"; the reason given being cuts in government funding to schools made by the Coalition Government.[14] One Middle School closed in 2011[15] and two more closed in 2014.[16] In July 2015, the borough council announced its intention to support schools in the introduction of a borough-wide move to two-tier provision.[17] As a result, the majority of schools now have plans in place to change their age range by 2019.

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Castle Newnham School[fn 1]Bedford9–16Secondary490109661
Goldington Academy[fn 2]Bedford9–13Secondary690136552
Marston Vale Middle SchoolStewartby9–13Secondary580145861
Westfield School[fn 3]Bedford4–13Primary370109666

Central Bedfordshire

Schools in the unitary authority, operated by Bedfordshire County Council until April 2009. Some locality groups, such as schools in Dunstable, have undergone local re-organisations to remove middle schools.

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Alameda Middle SchoolAmpthill9–13Secondary690137249
Arnold AcademyBarton-le-Clay9–13Secondary600136829
Biggleswade AcademyBiggleswade2–13Primary1090137947
Brooklands Middle SchoolLeighton Buzzard9–13Secondary470137636
Edward Peake Middle SchoolBiggleswade9–13Secondary450109694
Etonbury AcademyArlesey9–16Secondary760137632
Fulbrook Middle SchoolWoburn Sands9–13Secondary410137904
Gilbert Inglefield AcademyLeighton Buzzard9–13Secondary440138003
Henlow Church of England AcademyHenlow9–13Secondary510138027
Holywell CE (VA) Middle SchoolCranfield9–13Secondary610138844
Leighton Middle SchoolLeighton Buzzard9–13Secondary510109689
Linslade SchoolLinslade9–13Secondary580136766
Parkfields Middle SchoolToddington9–13Secondary460109662
Potton Middle SchoolPotton9–13Secondary220109676
Priory AcademyDunstable9–16Secondary680138181
Robert Bloomfield AcademyShefford9–13Secondary920136713
Sandye Place AcademySandy9–13Secondary500136541
Woodland Middle School AcademyFlitwick9–13Secondary590136560

Dorset

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Allenbourn Middle SchoolWimborne Minster9–13Secondary610113859
Cranborne Middle SchoolCranborne9–13Secondary390113853
Dorchester Middle SchoolDorchester9–13Secondary620138186
Emmanuel CofE Middle SchoolVerwood9–13Secondary400113894
Ferndown Middle SchoolFerndown9–13Secondary540113878
Lockyer's Middle SchoolCorfe Mullen9–13Secondary490113862
St Mary's CofE Middle SchoolPuddletown9–13Secondary510138189
St Michael's Church of England Middle SchoolColehill9–13Secondary530113891
St Osmund's Church of England Middle SchoolDorchester9–13Secondary650138165
West Moors Middle SchoolWest Moors9–13Secondary200113861

Hertfordshire

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Edwinstree CofE Middle SchoolBuntingford9–13Secondary420117554
Ralph Sadleir SchoolPuckeridge9–13Secondary340117543
Roysia Middle School[fn 4]Royston9–13Secondary180137657
The Greneway Middle School[fn 4]Royston9–13Secondary440137658

Kirklees

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Kirkburton Middle SchoolKirkburton10–13Secondary490107773
Scissett Middle SchoolScissett10–13Secondary570107765

Newcastle upon Tyne

A new school is proposed to open at Great Park, Gosforth in 2020, which will be a middle school with age range 9-16.[19]

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Gosforth Central Middle SchoolGosforth9–13Secondary500108519
Gosforth East Middle SchoolGosforth9–13Secondary490108521
Gosforth Junior High Academy[fn 5]Gosforth9–13Secondary630136348

North Tyneside

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Marden Bridge Middle SchoolWhitley Bay9–13Secondary480108635
Monkseaton Middle SchoolMonkseaton9–13Secondary330108637
Valley Gardens Middle SchoolMonkseaton9–13Secondary750108636
Wellfield Middle SchoolSouth Wellfield9–13Secondary290108649

Northumberland

Northumberland County Council began a process of closing middle schools across the authority in 2006. This was later abandoned following funding difficulties.[20]

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Bellingham Middle School[fn 6]Bellingham9–13Secondary130122350
Berwick Middle SchoolBerwick-upon-Tweed9–13Secondary300122354
Chantry Middle SchoolMorpeth9–13Secondary530137747
Corbridge Middle SchoolCorbridge9–13Secondary320122326
Dr Thomlinson CE Middle SchoolRothbury9–13Secondary210145639
Glendale Middle SchoolWooler9–13Secondary120122352
Haltwhistle Upper School AcademyHaltwhistle9–13Secondary140144771
Hexham Middle SchoolHexham9–13Secondary470122364
Highfield Middle SchoolPrudhoe9–13Secondary450122340
James Calvert Spence CollegeAmble9–18Secondary740122363
Meadowdale AcademyBedlington9–13Secondary430138078
Newminster Middle SchoolMorpeth9–13Secondary530137748
Ovingham Middle SchoolOvingham9–13Secondary350122341
Ponteland Middle SchoolPonteland9–13Secondary620143469
Richard Coates CE Middle School[fn 7]Ponteland4–13Secondary480122370
St Joseph's RC Middle SchoolHexham9–13Secondary340122369
Seaton Sluice Middle SchoolSeaton Sluice9–13Secondary310122334
Tweedmouth Middle SchoolBerwick-upon-Tweed9–13Secondary310122348
Whytrig Middle SchoolSeaton Delaval9–13Secondary220122335

Poole

Poole Borough Council closed all of its middle-deemed-primary schools in August 2013.[21]

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Broadstone Middle SchoolBroadstone9–13Secondary490141184

Somerset

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Danesfield CofE Middle SchoolWilliton9–13Secondary300123895
Fairlands Middle SchoolCheddar9–13Secondary460123888
Hugh Sexey Church of England Middle SchoolBlackford9–13Secondary590123897
Maiden Beech AcademyCrewkerne9–13Secondary400137118
Minehead Middle SchoolMinehead9–13Secondary550136774
Oakfield AcademyFrome9–13Secondary600136970
Selwood AcademyFrome9–13Secondary600137741
Swanmead Community SchoolIlminster9–13Secondary270123875

Staffordshire

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Bilbrook CofE Middle SchoolCodsall9–13Secondary140124453
Brewood CE Middle SchoolBrewood9–13Secondary420124452
Christ Church AcademyStone9–13Secondary560136961
Churnet View Middle SchoolLeek9–13Secondary440124436
Codsall Middle SchoolCodsall9–13Secondary540124424
James Bateman Junior High SchoolBiddulph9–13Secondary340124428
Oldfields Hall Middle SchoolUttoxeter9–13Secondary510145376
Penkridge Middle SchoolPenkridge9–13Secondary430144206
Perton Middle SchoolPerton9–13Secondary350124437
Ryecroft CE Middle SchoolRocester9–13Secondary210145375
St Edwards CofE(VA) Junior High SchoolLeek9–13Secondary750139171
Walton Priory Middle SchoolStone9–13Secondary400124426
Windsor Park CE Middle SchoolUttoxeter9–13Secondary350144007
Woodhouse AcademyBiddulph9–13Secondary450124432

Suffolk

Suffolk County Council planned to close all middle schools in its authority by 2013, later delayed to 2016. The two remaining schools became part of an all-through academy trust, thereby removing themselves from the local authority-led process to close three-tier schools.

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Horringer Court SchoolBury St Edmunds9–13Secondary410124806
Westley SchoolBury St Edmunds9–13Secondary490137180

Windsor and Maidenhead

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Dedworth Middle SchoolWindsor9–13Secondary460110072
St Edwards Royal Free Ecumenical Middle SchoolWindsor9–13Secondary480110086
St Peter's Middle School, Old WindsorOld Windsor9–13Secondary230110085
Trevelyan Middle SchoolWindsor9–13Secondary500110075

Worcestershire

Name Location Age
Range
[18]
Deemed
status
[18]
Number
on Roll
[18]
URN Website
Abbey Park MiddlePershore9–12Primary200116774
Alvechurch Church of England Middle SchoolAlvechurch9–13Secondary430143507
Aston Fields Middle SchoolBromsgrove9–13Secondary590116957
Birchensale MiddleRedditch9–13Secondary500116967
Blackminster MiddleSouth Littleton10–13Secondary210116960
Bredon Hill Middle SchoolAshton under Hill10–13Secondary470143395
Catshill Middle SchoolCatshill9–13Secondary300116958
Church Hill MiddleRedditch9–13Secondary310142543
Ipsley CE RSA AcademyWinyates9–13Secondary560139020
Parkside MiddleBromsgrove9–13Secondary510116959
Ridgeway AcademyAstwood Bank9–16Secondary460139029
St Barnabas CE First & MiddleDrakes Broughton4–12Primary340144334
St Bede's Catholic MiddleRedditch9–13Secondary620116998
St Egwin's MiddleEvesham10–13Secondary370116984
St John's CE MiddleBromsgrove9–13Secondary660139286
St Nicholas' CE MiddlePinvin9–12Primary310144257
The De Montfort SchoolEvesham10–18Secondary940116932
Walkwood CE MiddleRedditch9–13Secondary640139185
Westacre MiddleDroitwich Spa9–12Primary370116778
Witton MiddleDroitwich Spa9–12Primary470116779
Woodfield AcademyRedditch9–13Secondary570138208

Authorities where middle schools have been discontinued

Many authorities in regions of England previously had middle schools, with either local areas or whole counties since reverting to the more traditional two-tier model. These are listed briefly by region.

East of England

Norfolk closed its last middle schools - which were deemed primary - in 2008.[22] Suffolk began the process of closing its middle schools in 2006, having reduced its numbers from a high of 40 schools.[23] The only middle school in Cambridgeshire (which fed into Bedfordshire upper schools) closed in 2018.

East Midlands

Northamptonshire closed its middle schools in and around Northampton in 2002,[24] with its final two middle schools closing in 2015. Leicestershire had a number of middle schools which covered the 10-14 age range, alongside others which were for Key Stage 3 students (11-14). The last of the middle schools closed in 2017. Nottinghamshire formerly had a three tier system around Newark-on-Trent and in Mansfield, with the latter closing in 2001.[25]

London

The London Borough of Harrow closed its middle deemed primary schools in 2011. The London Borough of Merton had about 14 middle schools for the 9-13 age range, which were converted to deemed-primary (8-12) schools in the 1990s. These schools reverted to primary use by 2002.[24]

North East England

The three authorities with existing middle schools (Newcastle, Northumberland, North Tyneside) all closed several middle schools since 1999.[24] A number of towns such as Hexham and Berwick-upon-Tweed still have middle schools.

South East England

Buckinghamshire's last middle schools closed in the 1990s.[24] Isle of Wight middle schools closed in 2011.[26] Kent's last three middle schools (on the Isle of Sheppey) closed in 2009.[27] The Hoo Peninsula middle schools were reorganised in 1994. Milton Keynes' system of middle schools was converted to primary schools in 2008. Oxfordshire closed its last middle-deemed-primary schools in Oxford in 2003.[24] West Sussex closed middle schools in Crawley in 2004, Adur in 2007, Midhurst & Petworth in 2009 and Worthing in 2015.[24] Its last middle school closed in 2017.

South West England

Devon closed its only middle schools, in Exeter, in 2005.[24] Dorset has closed a number of middle schools, including four which closed in 2013, as well as fourteen middle-deemed-primary schools which closed in the borough of Poole.[28] Wiltshire closed its last middle schools in 2005.[24]

West Midlands

Aldridge-Brownhills, Staffordshire (now West Midlands) - includes the towns of Aldridge and Brownhills as well as the villages of Pelsall and Streetly. Adopted 9-13 middle schools in 1972 (normally on different sites to 5-9 first schools) and retained this system until 1986, when the traditional age ranges were re-established. The authority had been merged into Walsall (which always had the traditional age ranges) in 1974.

Bewdley and Kidderminster, Worcestershire - adopted 9-13 middle schools in 1972, and the whole area retained this system after 1974 when the two boroughs merged to form Wyre Forest district council. The system was maintained until 2007, when the traditional age ranges were re-established throughout the area.[29]

Dudley, West Midlands (formerly Staffordshire) - incorporating towns of Dudley, Sedgley, Coseley and Brierley Hill. Adopted 8-12 middle schools in 1972 (some on the same site or within the same umbrella as 5-8 first schools) and retained this system until 1990, when the traditional age ranges were re-established. This coincided with a major reorganisation in the borough which saw sixth form facilities largely concentrated in further education colleges rather than secondary schools, as well as several secondary schools being closed or merged.[30]

Halesowen, West Midlands (formerly Worcestershire) - adopted 9-13 middle schools in 1972 and retained this system after 1974 when the town was absorbed into the borough of Dudley (see above) along with Stourbridge (which, along with Kingswinford, always used the traditional age ranges). Was one of the first local authorities to abolish middle schools when in 1982 the traditional age ranges were re-established. This reorganisation also saw the town's three secondary schools serving the 13-18 age range become 11-16 schools, with sixth form facilities concentrated at the expanded college in the town, while the town gained a fourth secondary school with the conversion of a former middle school into an 11-16 school.[31]

Sutton Coldfield (which was in Warwickshire until 1974) adopted 5-8 first schools and 8-12 middle schools in 1972 and did so for 20 years before reverting to 5-7 infant and 7-11 junior schools in 1992.

Northern Warwickshire (the area covered by the boroughs of North Warwickshire, Nuneaton and Bedworth and Rugby – adopted 5–8 first schools and 8–12 middle schools in 1972 and retained this system until 1996, when it reverted to the traditional ages of transfer (which had always applied in the south of the county).

Yorkshire and the Humber

Bradford closed its middle schools between 1998 and 2002, having been the home of the first purpose-built middle school in the country.[24] Kirklees local authority closed three middle schools in 2012.[32] North Yorkshire's two middle schools (at Ingleton and Settle) closed in 2012.[33] Leeds and Wakefield previously operated on the three-tier system before reverting during the 1990s.

Notes

  1. Part of a hard federation with 4-9 school of the same name. (See )
  2. Due to become secondary from 2019 (See )
  3. Due to become primary from 2019 (See )
  4. 1 2 Roysia and Greneway schools are part of a common multi-academy trust. The trust proposes merging the two middle schools with the Meridian upper school.
  5. Gosforth Junior High is federated with Gosforth High School
  6. Bellingham Middle School is due to close in August 2019
  7. Due to become primary from 2019

References

  1. "School Standards and Framework Act 1998 (c. 31)". The Stationery Office. 1998. pp. 28(4). Retrieved 2009-04-22.
  2. 1 2 "Middle Schools". Hansard, 4 June 1984, vol 61. UK Parliament. pp. cc64–5W. Retrieved 2009-04-14.
  3. "Education Act 1964". HMSO. 1964. p. 1. Retrieved 2009-04-22.
  4. Derek Gillard (2007). "Education in England - 1945-1978". Education in England: a brief history. Retrieved 2009-04-12.
  5. 1 2 "Middle schools decline due to haphazard development". Times Educational Supplement. 1981-11-13. p. 9.
  6. Jessel, Stephen (1970-10-12). "Guidance on setting up middle schools". The Times. p. 2.
  7. "School of the future". The Times. 1970-12-12. p. 13.
  8. Andrew, Herbert; Department of Education and Science (12 July 1965). "Main forms of comprehensive organisation". Circular 10/65: The Organisation of Secondary Education. HMSO. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 18 April 2009.
  9. "Government Clarifies Plan for Education Switch" (PDF). The Times. 1965-07-14. p. 6. Retrieved 2009-04-12.
  10. Central Advisory Council for Education (England) (1967). "10". In Bridget Plowden. Children and their primary School. 1. London: HMSO. pp. 344–407. ISBN 0-11-270129-9.
  11. 1 2 Maintained Primary and Secondary Schools; Number of Middle deemed Schools, London: Department for Children, Schools and Families, 2005
  12. 1 2 Barker, Irena (2007-02-02). "Endangered species?". Times Educational Supplement. TSL Education Ltd. Retrieved 2009-04-12.
  13. "The Decision Has Been Made..." Bedford Borough Council website. Bedford Borough Council. Archived from the original on 24 November 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-24.
  14. "Two-tier education plans scrapped". Bedfordshire on Sunday. Retrieved 2010-07-07.
  15. "The Future of Woodside Middle School". Bedford Borough Council website. Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  16. Published on Tuesday 21 February 2012 09:23 (2012-02-21). "Major schools shake-up confirmed - Education". Bedford Today. Retrieved 2014-07-23.
  17. "Two-tier change for borough's schools". Bedford Borough Council. Retrieved 12 July 2015.
  18. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 "Edubase2". Department for Children, Schools and Families. Archived from the original on 28 September 2008. Retrieved 12 April 2009.
  19. "Great Park Update: June 2017".
  20. Brooks, Robert (2008-10-19). "Two-tier education under the spotlight". Northumberland Gazette. Johnston Press Digital Publishing. Retrieved 2009-04-24.
  21. "Latest News - Schools for the Future". Poole Borough Council. 2009. Archived from the original on 8 July 2011. Retrieved 2009-04-24.
  22. "Norfolk schools close in education shake-up". BBC News website. BBC. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  23. "SOR background and archive". SCC Website. Suffolk County Council. Archived from the original on 16 March 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  24. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Wainwright, Geoff. "Information on Authorities with Middle Schools in 2004". Survey of Middle Schools in English LEAs. Learning Community 7 (North Bedfordshire). Archived from the original on 6 May 2006. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  25. "Berry Hill Middle School".
  26. "Schools Reorganisation". IOW website. Archived from the original on 18 February 2013. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  27. "Security costs Sheppey school £266,000 in three years". Kent Online. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  28. "Age of Transfer". Poole.gov.uk. Retrieved 11 August 2013.
  29. Cousin, S (2008). "Work starts on school extension". Worcester News. Retrieved 2010-03-03.
  30. "Work in progress list of school changes in Dudley" (PDF). Dudley Council. Retrieved 2010-03-03.
  31. Hunt, Julian (2004). A History of Halesowen. Phillimore & Co Ltd.
  32. "School changes due to the re‐organisation of Whitcliffe Mount Pyramid 2012/13" (PDF). Kirklees Council website. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 July 2013. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  33. Proctor, Kate. "Ingleton and Settle middle schools closure confirmed". The Westmorland Gazette website. Newsquest (North West). Retrieved 2 February 2013.

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