List of countries by population in 1000

Historical Demographics

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List of Countries by Population
110001500

This is a list of countries by population in 1000. Estimate numbers are from the beginning of the year, and exact population figures are for countries that held a census on various dates in that year.

Country/TerritoryPopulation c.1000 estimatePercentage of World Population
  World[1]310,000,000 [notes 1]-
       Song dynasty[2][3][4] 75,000,000 24.19%
Byzantine Empire[5][6] 12,000,000 3.87%
  Fatimid Caliphate[8][9] 7,242,000 2.3%
Japan[10] 7,000,000 2.26%
Caliphate of Córdoba.[11][12] 7,000,000 2.26%
Kievan Rus'[13] 5,400,000 1.74%
Holy Roman Empire[8][9] 5,650,000 1.82%
       Liao Empire[16] 3,250,000 1.05%
Goryeo[9][notes 2] 3,070,000 0.99%
Principality of Hungary[17] 1,250,000 0.40%
Kingdom of England[18][19] 1,250,000 0.40%
Abbasid Caliphate[20] 1,200,000 0.40%
Poland[21] 1,000,000 0.32%
Duchy of Bohemia[9] 900,000 0.29%
Khmer Empire[9][notes 3] 841,000 0.27%
Bulgarian Empire[9] 882,000 0.26%
       High Kingship of Ireland[18] 600,000 0.19%
Kingdom of Denmark[18] 500,000 0.16%
Principality of Hungary[9] 500,000 0.16%
       Kingdom of Croatia[9] 412,000 0.13%
       Kingdom of Sweden[18] 400,000 0.13%
Kingdom of Scotland[18] 300,000 0.10%
Duchy of Bosnia[9] 286,000 0.09%
Kingdom of Norway[18] 200,000 0.06%
Khmer Empire[22] 200,000 0.06%
       Prataharan Empire[22] 66,000 0.02%
Republic of Venice[23] 60,000 0.02%

See also

Bibliography

  • Herlihy, David (1989), "Medieval Demography", in Strayer, Joseph R., Dictionary of the Middle Ages, 4, New York: Scribner, ISBN 0-684-17024-8 .
  • Urlanis, B T︠S︡ (1941). Rost naselenii︠a︡ v Evrope : opyt ischislenii︠a︡ [Population growth in Europe] (in Russian). Moskva: OGIZ-Gospolitizdat. OCLC 42379320. 

Notes

  1. Estimates range from 250,000,000 to 400,000,000
  2. Figures are for area of modern day South Korea alone.
  3. Figures are for the areas of modern Laos and Cambodia. None of modern south Thailand is included.

References

  1. Data from United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Archived 2014-03-20 at the Wayback Machine.
    1950–2100 estimates (only medium variants shown): (a) World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision. Archived 2010-08-19 at the Wayback Machine.
    Estimates prior to 1950: (b) "The World at Six Billion", 1999.
    Estimates from 1950 to 2100: (c) "Population of the entire world, yearly, 1950 - 2100", 2013.
    2014: (d) http://esa.un.org/unpd/wup/Highlights/WUP2014-Highlights.pdf "2014 World Urbanization Prospects", 2014.]
    2015: (e) http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/Publications/Files/Key_Findings_WPP_2015.pdf "2015 World Urbanization Prospects", 2015.]
  2. Ebrey, Walthall & Palais 2006, p. 156.
  3. Brook 1998, p. 96.
  4. Veeck et al. 2007, pp. 103–104.
  5. W. Treadgold, A History of the Byzantine State and Society, 570
  6. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-08-26. Retrieved 2015-07-23.
  7. The themes of Nikopolis, Hellas, Peloponnesos, Thessaloniki, Strymon, Cephalonia, and Crete.
  8. 1 2 "Appendix B Growth of World Population, GDP and GDP Per Capita before 1820 at 'www.ggdc.net/MADDISON/other_books/appendix_B.pdf'".
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "Two Thousand Years of Economic Statistics, Volume 1". Retrieved 13 Oct 2017.
  10. (a) Jean-Noël Biraben, "The History of the Human Population From the First Beginnings to the Present" in "Demography: Analysis and Synthesis: A Treatise in Population" (Eds: Graziella Caselli, Jacques Vallin, Guillaume J. Wunsch) Vol 3, Chapter 66, pp 5–18, Academic Press, San Diego (2005). (b) Jean-Noël Biraben, "An Essay Concerning Mankind's Evolution", Population, Selected Papers, Vol. 4, pp. 1–13 (1980). (c) Jean-Noël Biraben, "Essai sur l'évolution du nombre des hommes", Population Vol. 34 (no. 1), pp. 13–25 (1979).
  11. Glick 1999, Chapter 5: Ethnic Relations.
  12. "The rate of conversion is slow until the tenth century (less than one-quarter of the eventual total number of converts had been converted); the explosive period coincides closely with the reign of 'Abd al-Rahmdn III (912–961); the process is completed (eighty percent converted) by around 1100. The curve, moreover, makes possible a reasonable estimate of the religious distribution of the population. Assuming that there were seven million Hispano-Romans in the peninsula in 711 and that the numbers of this segment of the population remained level through the eleventh century (with population growth balancing out Christian migration to the north), then by 912 there would have been approximately 2.8 million indigenous Muslims (muwalladûn) plus Arabs and Berbers. At this point Christians still vastly outnumbered Muslims. By 1100, however, the number of indigenous Muslims would have risen to a majority of 5.6 million.", (Glick 1999, Chapter 1: At the crossroads of civilization)
  13. Б.Ц.Урланис. "Рост населения в Европе" (PDF). p. 89. (in Russian)
  14. Maleczyński, Karol (1960). Krajobraz, osadnictwo, stosunki etniczne i językowe (pp. 145-161); in: Historia Śląska. Vol. I. do roku 1763. Ossolineum. p. 159.
  15. Kamusella, Tomasz (1999). The Dynamics of the Policies of Ethnic Cleansing in Silesia in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (PDF). Open Society Institute. p. 109. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2017-02-24.
  16. Ebrey (1996), 166.
  17. Péter Rabb, Natural conditions in the Carpathian Basin of the middle ages, 2007, p. 58
  18. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Urlanis, B T︠S︡ (1941). Rost naselenii︠a︡ v Evrope : opyt ischislenii︠a︡ [Population growth in Europe] (in Russian). Moskva: OGIZ-Gospolitizdat. OCLC 42379320.
  19. "History of Wales".
  20. George Modelski, World Cities: –3000 to 2000, Washington DC: FAROS 2000, 2003. ISBN 0-9676230-1-4
  21. Jerzy Lukowski, Hubert Zawadzki, A Concise History of Poland, Cambridge University Press, 2001, ISBN 0-521-55917-0, Google Print, p.6
  22. 1 2 "Populations of Largest Cities in PMNs from 2000BC to 1988AD". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original (TXT) on September 29, 2007. Retrieved 2018-06-29.
  23. Spruyt, H. (1996). The Sovereign State and Its Competitors: An Analysis of Systems Change. Princeton University Press. p. 132. ISBN 978-0-691-02910-8.
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