List of Uzbek dishes

This is a list of notable Uzbekistani dishes and foods. Uzbek cuisine is the cuisine of Uzbekistan. The cuisine is influenced by local agriculture such as grain farming. Breads and noodles are a significant part of the cuisine, and Uzbek cuisine has been characterized as "noodle-rich".[1] Mutton is a popular variety of meat[2] due to the abundance of sheep in the country, and it used in various Uzbek dishes. Ingredients used varies by season.[2] For example, in the winter, dried fruits and vegetables, noodles and preserves are prominent, while in the summer vegetables, fruits (particularly melon) and nuts are more prominent.[2] Bread (nan, obi non) has a prominent role in Uzbek cuisine, and is influenced by pre-Islamic traditions.[2] In Uzbek culture, elders are typically served food first, as a sign of respect toward them.[3]

Uzbek dishes and foods

  • Çäkçäk – unleavened dough fried in oil
  • Chuchvara – a very small dumpling typical of Uzbek cuisine that is made of unleavened dough squares filled with meat.
  • Chorba – one of various kinds of soup or stew found in national cuisines across the Balkans, Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and the Middle East.
  • Dimlama – An Uzbek stew prepared with various combinations of meat, potatoes, onions, vegetables, and sometimes fruits. Meat (mutton or beef) and vegetables are cut into large pieces and placed in layers in a tightly sealed pot to simmer slowly in their own juices.
  • Katyk – sour-milk yogurt [2]
  • Lagman – lamb and noodle soup[4]
  • Manti – also referred to as kaskoni,[5] dumplings filled with ground meat and onion that are steamed.[3] Typical meats used include mutton and beef.[3] Manti are sometimes prepared in a specialized steamer designed to cook them, called a mantyshnitsa.[3]
  • Meats include mutton, beef, poultry, goat meat, camel meat and horse meat (such as horse meat sausage)[2]
  • Melons (qovun), such as watermelon, are a prominent part of Uzbek cuisine.[3] Qovun means "melon", and may refer to a melon that has an elongated shape, which has been described as "exceptionally sweet and succulent."[3] Melons are often served as a dessert.[3]
  • Naryn – a pasta dish made with fresh hand-rolled noodles and horse meat.
  • Noodle-based dishes[5]
  • Fried nuts and almonds[2]
  • Obi Non – also called patyr[5] and nan,[2] is a bread that is a staple food in Uzbek cuisine. It is formed into large discs and cooked.[2] Tradition holds that the bread is always placed flat side up (rather than upside-down), and never cut with a knife.[2] Non is a significant part of Uzbek cuisine, and is influenced by pre-Islamic traditions.[2] It is typically prepared in tandir ovens.[3] Styles of non can vary by region.[3]
  • Oshi toki – stuffed grape leaves[5]
  • Plov – a pilaf dish, it is a national dish of Uzbekistan.[3][5] In Uzbek culture, it is customary for men to prepare the dish when it is served at feasts or celebrations.[2] Per tradition, plov is typically eaten without the use of utensils, with the right hand, although sometimes a spoon is used.[3]
  • Rice dishes [2]
  • Samsapastries filled with various meats and onion and cooked in a tandoor or standard oven.[3][5]
  • Shakarap – a salad prepared with tomato, onion, salt and pepper[5] Some versions use a pumpkin filling during autumn.[3]
  • Kabob[3][5] – meats (typically mutton or beef) grilled on a skewer or with a spit. Kabob are often sold at food stands and roadway stalls. Traditional kabob are prepared with meat only, omitting vegetables.[3]
  • Shurpa – a popular soup prepared with potatoes, vegetables and meat (typically mutton)[3][5]
  • Sumalak – sweet paste made entirely from germinated wheat (young wheatgrass)
  • Suzma – clotted milk that is strained, forming curds[2]
  • Tirit – prepared to avoid wasting dry bread, it is prepared with the broth of offals and cutting dry bread and adding ground pepper and onion.
  • Yogurt soup – yogurt soup cooked with a variety of herbs, rice and sometimes chickpeas.

Beverages

Alcoholic beverages

Desserts

  • Halvah [5] (lavz) – in Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, soft sesame halva is made from sugar syrup, egg whites, and sesame seeds. Solid sesame halva is made from pulled sugar, repeatedly stretched to give a white color, and prepared sesame is added to the warm sugar and formed on trays.

See also

References

  1. Sietsema, Robert (January 19, 1999). "Two Hours Before the Maste". Village Voice. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Cavendish, Marshall (2006). World and Its Peoples. Marshall Cavendish. p. 706. ISBN 0761475710.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 Hanks, Reuel R. (2005). Central Asia: A Global Studies Handbook. ABC-CLIO. pp. 125–130. ISBN 1851096566.
  4. DK Publishing (2013). DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Russia. Penguin. p. 282. ISBN 146541794X.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Uzbekistan Country Study Guide Volume 1 Strategic Information and Developments. Int'l Business Publications. 2013. pp. 56–57. ISBN 1438775881.
  6. A. Y. Tamime (ed.) (2008). Fermented Milks. John Wiley & Sons. p. 124. ISBN 9781405172387.
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