List of Russian dishes

This is a list of notable dishes found in Russian cuisine.[1] Russian cuisine is a collection of the different cooking traditions of the Russian peoples. The cuisine is diverse, with Northeast European/Baltic, Caucasian, Central Asian, Siberian, East Asian and Middle Eastern influences.[2] Russian cuisine derives its varied character from the vast and multi-ethnic expanse of Russia.

Russian dishes

Name Image Description
Beef Stroganoff Pieces of sautéed beef in sauce, with smetana (sour cream)[3]
Blini Pancakes of various thickness and ingredients[4][5]
Caviar Processed, salted roe, often of sturgeon[6]
Chicken Kiev French-inspired chicken cutlet with butter sauce as filling[7]
Coulibiac A fish (usually salmon or sturgeon) loaf, with rice, hard-boiled eggs, mushrooms, and dill[8]
Dressed herring Diced, salted herring covered with layers of grated, boiled vegetables (potatoes, carrots, beet roots), chopped onions, and mayonnaise[9][5]
Golubtsy Cooked cabbage leaves wrapped around a variety of fillings[10][5]
Guriev porridge A Russian porridge dish prepared from semolina and milk with the addition of nuts (hazelnut, walnuts, almonds), kaimak (creamy foams) and dried fruits.[11]
Kasha Porridge. Buckwheat,[12] millet, oat, wheat and semolina kashas are widely popular in Russia,[13][5] especially as children's food
Kissel Fruit dessert of sweetened juice, thickened with arrowroot, cornstarch or potato starch[14]
Knish A baked or fried potato dumpling made of flaky dough[15][16]
Kholodets A meat jelly that is also known as studen[5][17]
Kulich One of the two sine qua non attributes of the Russian Easter (the other is Paskha).[18] A type of Easter bread.[18]
Makarony po-flotski Literally navy-style pasta, a dish made of cooked pasta (typically macaroni, penne or fusilli) mixed with stewed ground meat, fried onions and seasoned with salt and black pepper.
Mimosa salad A festive salad, whose main ingredients are cheese, eggs, canned fish, onion, and mayonnaise
Okroshka Cold soup of mostly raw vegetables like cucumbers, spring onions, boiled potatoes, with eggs, and a cooked meat such as beef, veal, sausages, or ham with kvas, topped with sour cream[19]
Oladyi Small thick pancakes[20]
Olivier salad Diced potatoes, eggs, chicken or bologna, sweet peas, and pickles with a mayonnaise dressing. Other vegetables, such as carrot or fresh cucumbers, can be added.[21][5]
Paskha Tvorog (farmer's cheese) plus heavy cream, butter, sugar, vanilla, etc., usually molded in the form of a truncated pyramid. Traditional for Easter.
Pelmeni Dumplings consisting of a meat filling wrapped in thin, pasta dough[22][23][5]
Pirog A pie either with a sweet or savoury filling[24]
Pirozhki Small pies[25][5]
Pozharsky cutlet A breaded ground chicken patty[26]
Rassolnik A soup made from pickled cucumbers, pearl barley, and pork or beef kidneys[27]
Shchi A cabbage soup.[28] Also can be based on sauerkraut.[28] Kislye Shchi (sour shchi) despite its name is a fizzy beverage similar to kvass, usually with honey.
Solyanka A thick, spicy and sour soup that contains fish and pickled cucumbers[29]
Sorrel soup Water or broth, sorrel leaves, salt, sometimes with whole eggs or egg yolks, potatoes, carrots, parsley root, and rice[30][31]
Syrniki Fried pancakes made of quark, usually topped with sour cream, varenye, jam, honey, or apple sauce[32][33]
Ukha A clear soup, made from various types of fish[34]
Vatrushka A pastry with a ring of dough and sweet farmer's cheese in the middle[35]
Veal Orlov A dish invented by the French[36] consisting of braised loin of veal, thinly sliced, filled with a thin layer of pureed mushrooms and onions between each slice, topped with bechamel sauce and cheese. Various versions of this dish usually go by the name French-style meat in Russia today.
Vinegret Diced boiled vegetables (beet roots, potatoes, carrots), chopped onions, and sauerkraut and/or pickled cucumbers.[37][38][39] Other ingredients, such as green peas or beans, are sometimes also added.[38][39] Dressed with vinaigrette or simply with sunflower or other vegetable oil.
Zakuski Refers to a variety of hors d'oeuvres, snacks, appetizers, usually served buffet style.[40] It often includes cold cuts, cured fishes, mixed salads, kholodets, various pickled vegetables and mushrooms, pirozhki, caviar, deviled eggs, open sandwiches, canapés and breads.[40]

Unsorted dishes

Beverages

Name Image Description
Acidophiline A type of drinkable yogurt, with Lactobacillus acidophilus as the starter culture. Kefir yeast is also added.[41]
Kvass A fermented non-alcoholic beverage made from black or regular rye bread or dough[42]
Medovukha A traditional Russian honey-based drink analogous to its counterparts of other Indo-European peoples[43]
Mors A non-carbonated Russian fruit drink[44][45][46] prepared from berries, mainly from lingonberry and cranberry (although sometimes blueberries, strawberries or raspberries).
Sbiten A traditional Russian honey-based drink similar to Medovukha[47]
Stewler A fermented milk product that is popular in Russia.[48][49] Similar to ryazhenka, it is made by adding sour cream (smetana) to baked milk.[49]
Tarasun An alcoholic beverage drunk by the Buryat people of Siberia. Apart from being the national drink of Buryatia, it is also used by the Buryats in their religious ceremonies.[50][51]

See also

References

  1. Classic Russian Cooking, Elena Molokhovets ("A Gift to Young Housewives"), Indiana University Press, 1992, ISBN 0-253-36026-9
  2. "The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  3. Von Bremzen, A.; Welchman, J. (1990). Please to the Table: The Russian Cookbook. Workman Pub. p. 146. ISBN 978-0-89480-753-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  4. "Meet the Man Who's Building a Fast-Casual Blini Empire". Food & Wine. December 15, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Don't Miss These 10 Russian Dishes When Going To The World Cup". caspiannews.com. November 29, 2017. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  6. Mitchell, C. (2009). Passport Russia 3rd Ed., eBook. World Trade Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-1-60780-027-9. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  7. Saveur. Meigher Communications. 2001. pp. 33–34. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  8. Vos, H. (2010). Passion of a Foodie - An International Kitchen Companion. Strategic Book Publishing. p. 158. ISBN 978-1-934925-63-8. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  9. Calzolaio, Scott (December 19, 2017). "What's cooking this holiday season". Milford Daily News. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  10. Mack, G.R.; Surina, A. (2005). Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia. Food culture around the world. Greenwood Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-313-32773-5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  11. Goldstein, D.; Mintz, S. (2015). The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets. Oxford University Press. p. 597. ISBN 978-0-19-931362-4. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  12. Molokhovets, E.; Toomre, J. (1998). Classic Russian Cooking: Elena Molokhovets' a Gift to Young Housewives. Indiana-Michigan Series in Rus. Indiana University Press. p. 334. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  13. Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 126. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  14. Russian History: Histoire Russe. University Center for International Studies, University of Pittsburgh. 1995. pp. 20–21. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  15. "Recipe: Knish – The Carbohydrate-Laden Jewish Comfort Food". The Moscow Times. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  16. Mack, G.R.; Surina, A. (2005). Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia. Food culture around the world. Greenwood Press. p. 138. ISBN 978-0-313-32773-5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  17. Encyclopaedia of Contemporary Russian. Taylor & Francis. 2013. p. 296. ISBN 978-1-136-78786-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  18. 1 2 Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 67. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  19. Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 125. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  20. Lonely Planet Russia. Travel Guide. Lonely Planet Publications. 2015. p. pt327. ISBN 978-1-74360-501-1. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  21. Perianova, I. (2013). The Polyphony of Food: Food through the Prism of Maslow’s Pyramid. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. p. 137. ISBN 978-1-4438-4511-3. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  22. Barber, C. (2015). Pierogi Love: New Takes on an Old-World Comfort Food. Gibbs Smith. p. 42. ISBN 978-1-4236-4066-0. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  23. Russian Travel Monthly: A Publication of Russian Information Services, Inc. Russian Information Services. 1994. pp. 4–5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  24. Mack, G.R.; Surina, A. (2005). Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia. Food culture around the world. Greenwood Press. p. 200. ISBN 978-0-313-32773-5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  25. Petrovskaya, K.; Wayne, K.P. (1992). Russian Cookbook. Dover. p. 143. ISBN 978-0-486-27329-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  26. Art & Auction. Art & Auction Magazine. 2004. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  27. Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 66. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  28. 1 2 Wright, C.A. (2011). The Best Soups in the World. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. pt51. ISBN 978-0-544-17779-6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  29. Sheraton, M.; Alexander, K. (2015). 1,000 Foods to Eat Before You Die: A Food Lover's Life List. 1,000-- before you die book. Workman Publishing. pp. 420–421. ISBN 978-0-7611-4168-6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  30. Gorina, R. (1945). Russian Fare: A Selection of Recipes. New Europe Publishing Company Limited. p. 6. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  31. Meyers, P. (1978). The peasant kitchen: a return to simple, good food. Vintage Books. pp. 97–98. ISBN 978-0-394-72651-9. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  32. Jones, C.C. (2013). A Year Of Russian Feasts. Transworld. p. pt82. ISBN 978-1-4464-8878-2. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  33. Mack, G.R.; Surina, A. (2005). Food Culture in Russia and Central Asia. Food culture around the world. Greenwood Press. p. 86. ISBN 978-0-313-32773-5. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  34. Goldstein, D. (1999). A Taste of Russia: A Cookbook of Russian Hospitality. Russian Life Books. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-880100-42-4. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  35. Encyclopaedia of Contemporary Russian. Taylor & Francis. 2013. p. 136. ISBN 978-1-136-78786-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  36. Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 62. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  37. В. В. Похлёбкин, Кулинарный словарь от А до Я, статья Винегрет, изд. Центрполиграф, 2000, ISBN 5-227-00460-9 (William Pokhlyobkin, Culinary Dictionary, Tsentrpoligraf publishing house, 2000)
  38. 1 2 И. А. Фельдман, Любимые блюда, изд. Реклама, 1988, с. 180-186, ISBN 5-88520-031-9 (I. A. Feldman, Favourite dishes, Reklama publishing house, 1988, p. 180-186)
  39. 1 2 Л. Я. Старовойт, М. С. Косовенко, Ж. М. Смирнова, Кулінарія, Київ, Вища школа, 1992, с. 218 (L. Ya. Starovoit, M. S. Kosovenko, Zh. M. Smirnova, Cookery, Kiev, Vyscha Shkola publishing house, 1992, p. 218)
  40. 1 2 Schultze, S. (2000). Culture and Customs of Russia. Culture and Customs of Europe. Greenwood Press. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-313-31101-7. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  41. "Ацидофилин". Kulina.ru. Retrieved 2017-12-23.
  42. Molokhovets, E.; Toomre, J. (1998). Classic Russian Cooking: Elena Molokhovets' a Gift to Young Housewives. Indiana-Michigan Series in Rus. Indiana University Press. p. 468. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  43. Lonely Planet Russia. Travel Guide. Lonely Planet Publications. 2015. p. pt318. ISBN 978-1-74360-501-1. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  44. "ЭСБЕ/Морс — Викитека". ru.wikisource.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  45. SRAS.ORG. "Mors: Russian Fruit Drink". www.sras.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  46. "CranberryJuice". NMU Languages, Literatures and International Studies. Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  47. Russian Life. Rich Frontier Publishing Company. 2003. p. 58. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
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  49. 1 2 translated; introduced,; Toomre, annotated by Joyce (1998). Classic Russian cooking : Elena Molokhovets' A gift to young housewives (1st paperback ed.). Bloomington: Indiana University Press. ISBN 978-0-253-21210-8.
  50. Curtin, p 28
  51. Fridman, Eva Jane Neumann (2004). Sacred Geography: Shamanism among the Buddhist peoples of Russia. Akadémiai Kiadó. p. 207. ISBN 9630581140.

Bibliography

  • Curtin, Jeremiah (1909). A journey in Southern Siberia. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. 
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