Edwin C. Horrell

Edwin C. Horrell
c. 1924
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1902-09-29)September 29, 1902
Jackson, Missouri
Died June 13, 1992(1992-06-13) (aged 89)
Beverly Hills, California
Playing career
1922–1924 California
Position(s) Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1926–1938 UCLA (assistant)
1939–1944 UCLA
Head coaching record
Overall 24–31–6
Bowls 0–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 PCC (1942)
Awards
All-American, 1924
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1969 (profile)

Edwin C. "Babe" Horrell (September 29, 1902 – June 13, 1992) was an American football player and coach. He played college football at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was an All-American in 1924 at center. Horrell served as the head football coach at the University of California, Los Angeles from 1939 to 1944, compiling a record of 24–31–6. In 1942, he led the UCLA Bruins to the Pacific Coast Conference title and an appearance in the Rose Bowl. Horrell was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1969.

Playing career

Horrell played as center for the California Golden Bears from 1922 to 1924. During those three seasons, the team went 26–0–3 under head coach Andy Smith.[1]

Coaching career

From 1926 to 1938, Horrell was an assistant coach for the UCLA Bruins.[1] He then served as the head coach from 1939 to 1944, compiling a 24–31–6 record. His 1942 UCLA Bruins team lost to Georgia in the 1943 Rose Bowl. He was the first coach to lead a UCLA team to defeat the rival USC Trojans. It was UCLA's first football victory in the UCLA–USC rivalry.

Head coaching record

Year Team Overall ConferenceStanding Bowl/playoffs AP#
UCLA Bruins (Pacific Coast Conference) (1939–1944)
1939 UCLA 6–0–45–0–3T–2nd7
1940 UCLA 1–91–69th
1941 UCLA 5–5–13–4–16th
1942 UCLA 7–46–11stL Rose13
1943 UCLA 1–80–43rd
1944 UCLA 4–5–11–2–13rd
UCLA: 24–31–616–17–5
Total:24–31–6
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

References

  1. 1 2 "College Football Hall of Fame". Retrieved December 2, 2007.
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