Dysthanasia

In medicine, dysthanasia means "bad death"[1] and is considered a common fault of modern medicine.[2]

Dysthanasia occurs when a person who is dying has their biological life extended through technological means without regard to the person's quality of life.[3] Technologies such as an implantable cardioverter defibrillator,[4] artificial ventilation, ventricular assist devices, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation can extend the dying process.

Dysthanasia is a term generally used when a person is seen to be kept alive artificially in a condition where, otherwise, they cannot survive; sometimes for some sort of ulterior motive. The term was used frequently in the investigation into the death of Formula One driver Ayrton Senna in 1994.

See also

References

  1. Kothari, M; Mehta, L; Kothari, V (2000). "Cause of death--so-called designed event acclimaxing timed happenings". Journal of Postgraduate Medicine. 46 (1): 43–51. PMID 10855082.
  2. Batchelor, A; Jenal, L; Kapadia, F; Streat, S; et al. (2003). "Ethics roundtable debate: Should a sedated dying patient be wakened to say goodbye to family?". Critical Care. 7 (5): 335–8. doi:10.1186/cc2329. PMC 270714. PMID 12974961.
  3. de Menezes, MB; Selli, L; de Souza, AJ (August 2009). "Dysthanasia: Nursing professionals' perception". Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem. 17 (4): 443–8. doi:10.1590/S0104-11692009000400002. PMID 19820848.
  4. Kaufman, SR; Mueller, PS; Ottenberg, AL; Koenig, BA (2011). "Ironic technology: Old age and the implantable cardioverter defibrillator in US health care". Social Science & Medicine. 72 (1): 6–14. doi:10.1016/j.socscimed.2010.09.052. PMC 3032945. PMID 21126815.

Further reading

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