Creighton University School of Law

Creighton University School of Law
Established 1904
School type Private
Dean Interim Dean Michael J. Kelly, JD, LLM
Location Omaha, Nebraska, United States
Enrollment 296
USNWR ranking 125 (out of 201 ABA accredited law schools)
Bar pass rate 73.4% (for first-time bar exam takers)
Website law.creighton.edu

Creighton University School of Law, located in Omaha, Nebraska, United States, is a Jesuit institution. According to Creighton's official 2016 ABA-required disclosures, 74.8% of the Class of 2016 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-advantaged or JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[1]

History

In 1904, the School of Law began as a joint project with the Omaha Bar Association, with Timothy J. Mahoney as the first dean. The School of Law was housed in the Edward Creighton Institute on S. 18th Street until 1921, when it moved to new quarters on the Creighton campus.[2]

Admissions

The middle 50% range of LSAT scores of the full-time Fall 2017 entering class was 149-155. The GPA range was 2.88-3.62. In this class, the male to female ratio is 64 percent to 34 percent, respectively. The diversity rate is 22 percent.

Scholarships

Creighton Law offers multiple types of scholarships to incoming first-year law students, as well as scholarships to returning second- and third-year law students. Examples include the Dean's Academic Scholarship and the Frances M. Ryan Diversity Scholarship. Approximately 50% of the entering class receive scholarships.

Programs

The majority of Creighton School of Law students are enrolled in a full-time Juris Doctor program, which takes three years to complete. A growing number of students are enrolled in the Accelerated JD program, which takes two years to complete. A small portion of the student body is enrolled in a part-time JD program, which takes approximately four years to complete.

Concentrations and joint degrees

Creighton School of Law offers six certificates and four joint degrees. The certificates are Health Law, Family Law, Business, Commercial and Tax Law; Criminal Law and Procedure, International and Comparative Law, and Litigation. The joint degree programs include the law 3/3 program with its BSBA/JD degree (the completion of an undergraduate degree and a JD in six years instead of seven), the MBA/JD degree, the JD/MS in Government Organization and Leadership (GOAL), and the JD/MS in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution.

Clinics

Creighton operates the Milton R. Abrahams Clinic, which offers free legal assistance on civil matters to low-income residents of Douglas County. Starting in the Fall of 2017, the Creighton Immigrant and Refugee Clinic, housed within the Milton R. Abrahams Clinic, offers support to immigrant and refugees and is run in cooperation with the Immigrant Legal Center (formerly known as Justice for Our Neighbors).

Activities

Creighton's Law Review is published four times annually. Students are selected based on class standing or writing ability to work on the Law Review during their second and third years. The Creighton International and Comparative Law Journal (CICLJ) is an online publication, founded in 2010, that serves as a forum for debate and exploration of international law issues. It also provides students with the opportunity to refine their research, writing, and critical-thinking skills to create articles.

The Moot Court team at Creighton has received recognition for winning a number of regional and national competitions.[3] The Black Law Students Association (BLSA), was selected as Creighton University’s “Most Outstanding Graduate/Professional School Student Organization” for the 2017-18 academic year.

Employment

According to Creighton's official 2016 ABA-required disclosures, 74.8% of the Class of 2016 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-advantaged or JD-required employment nine months after graduation.[4] Creighton's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 5%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2016 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[5]

Costs

Among top private Jesuit universities, Creighton is the least expensive institution for both tuition cost and cost of living. It is also among the lowest for average tuition rate increase in recent years.[6] The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at Creighton for the 2015–2016 academic year was $62,499.[7]

Notable events

On a bi-annual basis, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas co-teaches a course on constitutional law with professor G. Michael Fenner, JD. His last visit was in February 2017.

Once a year, the Nebraska Supreme Court holds session at Creighton University School of Law. The most recent session was in April 2018. The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit heard oral arguments at the law school in November 2017.

The law school completed a $4.6 million renovation over the years 2015-2017.

A poverty law program was launched in 2017.

On June 20, 2011, the Omaha World-Herald reported that Creighton Law School was temporarily reducing its class size.[8]

Notable alumni

See also

References

  1. "Employment Statistics" (PDF).
  2. Creighton University https://www.creighton.edu/about/history. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. INTA – 2006–2007 Saul Lefkowitz Moot Court Competition Winners Archived June 1, 2008, at the Wayback Machine.
  4. "Employment Statistics" (PDF).
  5. "Creighton University Profile" (PDF).
  6. Law School Transparency: http://www.lstscorereports.com/schools/
  7. "Tuition and Expenses".
  8. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on September 6, 2012. Retrieved June 21, 2011.
  9. http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/courts/sd-me-duffy-judge-20161223-story.html
  10. "Brad Ashford". Nebraska Legislature,. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  11. "Brad Ashford". U.S. House of Representatives,. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  12. "Frank A. Barrett". National Governors Association. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  13. Seravalli, Rachel (April 15, 2004). "Bourne's political road leads him to Legislature". The Daily Nebraskan. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  14. "John Cavanaugh III". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  15. Stoddard, Martha (September 16, 2016). "Republican challenging Ernie Chambers for Legislature seat takes state senator to task over business climate". Omaha World-Herald. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  16. "Hon. William M. Connolly (Retired)". Erickson Sederstrom. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  17. "Robert V. Denney". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  18. "Mike Johanns". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  19. "Steve Lathrop". Nebraska Legislature,. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  20. "Ray Madden". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  21. "Francis P. Matthews". Find A Grave. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  22. "Nebraska Supreme Court Justice Michael McCormack to retire at year's end". Creighton University. November 19, 2015. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  23. "John McKay, JD'82". Creighton University. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  24. "Eugene D. O'Sullivan". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  25. "Robert W. Pratt". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  26. "Michael Reasoner's Biography PrintTrack This Politician". Vote Smart. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  27. "Matt Schultz to run for Madison County attorney". The Daily Nonpareil. August 15, 2014. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  28. "Lyle E. Strom". Federal District of Nebraska. Retrieved February 25, 2015.
  29. "Douglas L. Struyk". Carney Appleby Law. Retrieved 13 October 2017.
  30. "Lee Terry". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved December 15, 2012.
  31. Blumenfeld, Laura (September 10, 1991). "The Nominee's Soul Mate". The Washington Post. The Washington Post Company. p. F01.

Coordinates: 41°15′51″N 95°56′40″W / 41.26417°N 95.94444°W / 41.26417; -95.94444

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