Coronaridine

Coronaridine
Clinical data
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.727
Chemical and physical data
Formula C21H26N2O2
Molar mass 338.44 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)

Coronaridine, also known as 18-carbomethoxyibogamine, is an alkaloid found in Tabernanthe iboga and related species, including Tabernaemontana divaricata for which (under the now obsolete synonym Ervatamia coronaria) it was named.[1]

Coronaridine persistently reduces the self-administration of cocaine and morphine in rats.[2]

Pharmacology

Coronaridine has been reported to bind to an assortment of molecular sites, including: μ-opioid (Ki = 2.0 μM), δ-opioid (Ki = 8.1 μM), and κ-opioid receptors (Ki = 4.3 μM), NMDA receptor (Ki = 6.24 μM) (as an antagonist),[3] and nAChRs (as an antagonist).[4] It has also been found to inhibit the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, act as a voltage-gated sodium channel blocker,[5] and displays estrogenic activity in rodents.[3][4] In contrast to ibogaine and other iboga alkaloids, coronaridine does not bind to either the σ1 or σ2 receptor.[5] Coronaridine also has estrogenic properties.[3]

See also

References

  1. Delorenzi JC, Freire-de-Lima L, Gattass CR, et al. (July 2002). "In vitro activities of iboga alkaloid congeners coronaridine and 18-methoxycoronaridine against Leishmania amazonensis". Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. 46 (7): 2111–5. doi:10.1128/aac.46.7.2111-2115.2002. PMC 127312. PMID 12069962.
  2. Glick SD, Kuehne ME, Raucci J, Wilson TE, Larson D, Keller RW Jr, Carlson JN (September 1994). "Effects of iboga alkaloids on morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats: relationship to tremorigenic effects and to effects on dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and striatum". Brain Res. 657 (1-2): 14–22. doi:10.1016/0006-8993(94)90948-2. PMID 7820611.
  3. 1 2 3 Christophe Wiart (16 December 2013). Lead Compounds from Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Neurodegenerative Diseases. Academic Press. pp. 67–69, 73. ISBN 978-0-12-398383-1.
  4. 1 2 Gideon Polya (15 May 2003). Biochemical Targets of Plant Bioactive Compounds: A Pharmacological Reference Guide to Sites of Action and Biological Effects. CRC Press. pp. 203–. ISBN 978-0-203-01371-7.
  5. 1 2 Chemistry and Biology. Academic Press. 21 September 1998. pp. 222–. ISBN 978-0-08-086576-8.


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