Caribbean Cup

Caribbean Cup
Founded 1989
Abolished 2017
Region Caribbean (CFU)
Number of teams 8 (finals)
31 (eligible to enter qualification)
Last champions  Curaçao (1st title)
Most successful team(s)  Trinidad and Tobago (8 titles)
Website www.caribbeancup.org

The Caribbean Cup was the championship tournament for national association football teams that are members of the Caribbean Football Union. The first competition was contested in 1989 in Barbados. The Caribbean Cup served as a qualification tournament among CFU members for the CONCACAF Gold Cup. The Caribbean Cup replaced the CFU Championship competition which was active between 1978 and 1988.

Trinidad and Tobago, eight-time winners, and Jamaica, six-time winners, were the most successful sides, winning a combined 14 of 18 titles. Martinique, Haiti, Cuba and Curaçao also won the tournament.

In 1990 on the day of the final, an insurrection in Trinidad and Tobago, the host nation, by the Jamaat al Muslimeen forced an abandonment of the tournament with only the final and 3rd place play-off game remaining. Also, the tournament was not held in 2000, 2002 and 2003.

The 2017 edition of the tournament was the 19th and final. The tournament was discontinued in favor of participation in the CONCACAF Nations League.[1]

Sponsors

Over the years, the tournament has been named after its respective sponsors. Shell had sponsored the competition since its inception in 1989.[2]

By February 1996, Jack Warner had announced a new sponsorship from sports apparel company Umbro for the 1996 Caribbean Cup.[3] The tournament was also co-sponsored by Umbro in 1997 before Shell re-attained sole-sponsorship for the 1998 event.

In October 1998, during the first and only year of sponsorship from the Asia Sport Group (now World Sport Group), the competition changed its name to Copa Caribe. CFU's chairman Jack Warner stated that the change was made to highlight the competition being a branch of the Copa de Oro.[4] Florida-based Inter/Forever (now Traffic Group) agreed a sponsorship deal to replace the Asia Sport Group agreement in January 1999.[5] The competition retained the title Copa Caribe for the 1999 and 2001 editions.

There was no competition held in 2003, instead teams focused on a group-stage only qualifying tournament.

Caribbean-based mobile phone company Digicel took over the sponsorship in 2004,[6] in June 2007 they agreed to sponsor the 2008 and 2010 events.[7] The 2012 and 2014 editions of the competition had no title sponsor, while the last tournament (in 2017) was sponsored by Scotiabank.[8]

Tournaments

Year Host Final Third place match
Winner Score Runner-up 3rd Place Score 4th place
Shell Caribbean Cup
1989
Details
 Barbados
Trinidad and Tobago
2 – 1
Grenada

Guadeloupe
n/a[n 1]
Netherlands Antilles
1990
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago Tournament not completed
( Trinidad and Tobago vs  Martinique)[n 2]
Tournament not completed
( Jamaica vs  Barbados)[n 2]
1991
Details
 Jamaica
Jamaica
2 – 0
Trinidad and Tobago

Saint Lucia
4 – 1
Guyana
1992
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
3 – 1
Jamaica

Martinique
1 – 1
(5–3 pen.)

Cuba
1993
Details
 Jamaica
Martinique
0 – 0
(6–5 pen.)

Jamaica

Trinidad and Tobago
3 – 2
Saint Kitts and Nevis
1994
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
7 – 2
Martinique

Guadeloupe
2 – 0
Suriname
1995
Details
 Cayman Islands
 Jamaica

Trinidad and Tobago
5 – 0
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Cuba
3 – 0
Cayman Islands
Shell/Umbro Caribbean Cup
1996
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
2 – 0
Cuba

Martinique
1 – 1
(3–2 pen.)

Suriname
1997
Details
 Antigua and Barbuda
 Saint Kitts and Nevis

Trinidad and Tobago
4 – 0
Saint Kitts and Nevis

Jamaica
4 – 1
Grenada
Shell Caribbean Cup
1998
Details
 Jamaica
 Trinidad and Tobago

Jamaica
2 – 1
Trinidad and Tobago

Haiti
3 – 2
Antigua and Barbuda
Copa Caribe
1999
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
2 – 1
Cuba
 Haiti
 Jamaica
n/a[n 3]
2001
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
3 – 0
Haiti

Martinique
1 – 0
Cuba
Digicel Caribbean Cup
2005
Details
 Barbados
Jamaica
RR[n 4]
Cuba

Trinidad and Tobago
RR[n 4]
Barbados
2007
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
Haiti
2 – 1
Trinidad and Tobago

Cuba
2 – 1
Guadeloupe
2008
Details
 Jamaica
Jamaica
2 – 0
Grenada

Guadeloupe
0 – 0
(5–4 pen.)

Cuba
2010
Details
 Martinique
Jamaica
[9]
1 – 1
(5–4 pen.)

Guadeloupe

Cuba
1 – 0
Grenada
Caribbean Cup
2012
Details
 Antigua and Barbuda[10]
Cuba
1 – 0
Trinidad and Tobago

Haiti
1 – 0
Martinique
2014
Details
 Jamaica
Jamaica
0 – 0
(4–3 pen.)

Trinidad and Tobago

Haiti
2 – 1
Cuba
Scotiabank Caribbean Cup
2017
Details
 Martinique
Curaçao
2 – 1
Jamaica

French Guiana
1 – 0
Martinique

Cumulative results

The following is a compiled national level championship table for the CFU region. Years in italics indicate that a nation was the host or co-host.

TeamTitlesRunners-upThird placeFourth place
 Trinidad and Tobago 8 (1989, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2001)5 (1991, 1998, 2007, 2012, 2014)2 (1993, 2005)0
 Jamaica 6 (1991, 1998, 2005, 2008, 2010, 2014)3 (1992, 1993, 2017)2 (1997, 1999)0
 Cuba 1 (2012)3 (1996, 1999, 2005)3 (1995, 2007, 2010)4 (1992, 2001, 2008, 2014)
 Haiti 1 (2007)1 (2001)4 (1998, 1999, 2012, 2014)0
 Martinique 1 (1993)1 (1994)3 (1992, 1996, 2001)2 (2012, 2017)
 Curaçao[n 5] 1 (2017)001 (1989)
 Grenada02 (1989, 2008)02 (1997, 2010)
 Guadeloupe01 (2010)3 (1989), (1994), (2008)1 (2007)
 Saint Kitts and Nevis01 (1997)01 (1993)
 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines01 (1995)00
 Saint Lucia001 (1991)0
 French Guiana001 (2017)0
 Suriname0002 (1994, 1996)
 Guyana0001 (1991)
 Cayman Islands0001 (1995)
 Antigua and Barbuda0001 (1998)
 Barbados0001 (2005)

Awards

Year Most Valuable player Top Goalscorer(Finals only) Best goalkeeper Fair play award
1989 Steve Mark[11] Dwight Yorke, Philbert Jones (2 goals)  Grenada
1991 Paul Davis Paul Davis (5 goals)
1992 Leonson Lewis (7 goals)[12]
1993 Walter Boyd Jean-Michel Modestin (5 goals)  Saint Kitts and Nevis
1994 David Nakhid
1995 David Nakhid
1996 Russell Latapy (6 goals)
1997 Jerren Nixon Clayton Ince
1998 Stern John Stern John (10 goals) Clayton Ince
1999 Raciel Martínez Ariel Álvarez (5 goals) Clayton Ince
2001 Dennis Lawrence Golman Pierre (5 goals) Clayton Ince
2005 Andy Williams[13] Luton Shelton (9 goals)
2007 Pierre Richard Bruny Gary Glasgow (6 goals)
2008 Eric Vernan[14] Kithson Bain, Luton Shelton (5 goals)
2010 Rodolph Austin Dane Richards, Kithson Bain (3 goals)
2012 eight players (2 goals)
2014 Rodolph Austin Kervens Belfort, Darren Mattocks and Kevin Molino (3 goals) Andre Blake  Haiti
2017 Gino van Kessel Elson Hooi (2 goals)

Notes

  1. No third place playoff was played. Third place was awarded based on table standings.
  2. 1 2 Play was suspended when Jamaat al Muslimeen attempted a coup d'état of the government of Trinidad and Tobago. The tournament was abandoned altogether after Tropical storm Arthur forced the cancellation of the final round of games. Trinidad and Tobago were to meet Martinique in the final, and Jamaica and Barbados were to meet in the third place match.
  3. The third place match was cancelled due to condition of field after the final was already played.
  4. 1 2 Finals played in round-robin format.
  5. Includes results from Netherlands Antilles.

See also

References

  1. "CONCACAF Nations League to replace Caribbean Cup". Caribbean National Weekly. Archived from the original on 20 April 2018. Retrieved 19 April 2018.
  2. "Shell Football Cup to kick off April 1989". Jamaica Gleaner. 25 August 1988. p. 12.
  3. "CFU boss takes shot at regional federations". Jamaica Gleaner. 28 February 1996. p. 1.
  4. "New name for Carib champs". Kingston Gleaner. 1 October 1998. p. 20.
  5. "New Sponsor, Format For Cup". Jamaica Gleaner. 7 January 1999.
  6. "Busy week for CFU's Burrell". Jamaica Gleaner. 26 April 2004. p. 14.
  7. "DIGICEL RENEWS SPONSORSHIP OF THE DIGICEL CARIBBEAN CUP". Digicel Group. 8 June 2007. Archived from the original on 3 April 2013. Retrieved 19 August 2012.
  8. https://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Curaçao_wins_maiden_Caribbean_Cup
  9. "Cummings, Jamaica win Caribbean Cup". coloradorapids.com. Archived from the original on 2012-03-20.
  10. "Coach: T&T unlucky". trinidadexpress.com. 16 November 2011. Archived from the original on 18 November 2011. Retrieved 5 January 2012.
  11. "Shell/Umbro jinx persists – Trinidad & Tobago Football History". www.ttfootballhistory.com. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05.
  12. "Trinidad regain Shell Cup – Trinidad & Tobago Football History". www.ttfootballhistory.com. Archived from the original on 2014-07-20.
  13. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2005-11-23. Retrieved 2012-06-03.
  14. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-08. Retrieved 2012-06-03.
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