Canada men's national ice hockey team

Canada
The Maple Leaf has always appeared on the uniform since 1920.[1]
Nickname(s) Team Canada
(Équipe Canada)
Association Hockey Canada
General Manager Martin Brodeur
Head coach Bill Peters
Assistants Bob Boughner
Mike Yeo
Captain Connor McDavid
Most games Brad Schlegel (304)
Top scorer Brad Schlegel
Most points Cliff Ronning (156)
Team colours Red, black, white[2]
              
IIHF code CAN
Ranking
Current IIHF 1
Highest IIHF 1 (first in 2003)
Lowest IIHF 5 (first in 2012)
First international
 Canada 8–1 Switzerland  
(Les Avants, Switzerland; January 10, 1910)
Biggest win
 Canada 47–0 Denmark 
(Stockholm, Sweden; February 12, 1949)
Biggest defeat
 Soviet Union 11–1 Canada 
(Vienna, Austria; April 24, 1977)
IIHF World Championships
Appearances 71 (first in 1920)
Best result Gold: (1920, 1924, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1994, 1997, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2015, 2016)
World Cup / Canada Cup
Appearances 8 (first in 1976)
Best result Winner: (1976, 1984, 1987, 1991, 2004, 2016)
Olympics
Appearances 22 (first in 1920)
Medals Gold: (1920, 1924, 1928, 1932, 1948, 1952, 2002, 2010, 2014)
Silver: (1936, 1960, 1992, 1994)
Bronze: (1956, 1968, 2018)
Canada men's national ice hockey team
Medal record
Olympic Games
1920 AntwerpTeam
1924 ChamonixTeam
1928 St. MoritzTeam
1932 Lake PlacidTeam
1948 St. MoritzTeam
1952 OsloTeam
2002 Salt Lake CityTeam
2010 VancouverTeam
2014 SochiTeam
1936 Garmisch-PartenkirchenTeam
1960 Squaw ValleyTeam
1992 AlbertvilleTeam
1994 LillehammerTeam
1956 Cortina d'AmpezzoTeam
1968 GrenobleTeam
2018 PyeongchangTeam
World Championships
1920 AntwerpTeam
1924 ChamonixTeam
1928 St. MoritzTeam
1930 Austria/France/Germany
1931 Poland
1932 Lake PlacidTeam
1934 Italy
1935 Switzerland
1937 Great Britain
1938 Czechoslovakia
1939 Switzerland
1948 St. MoritzTeam
1950 Great Britain
1951 France
1952 OsloTeam
1955 West Germany
1958 Norway
1959 Czechoslovakia
1961 Switzerland
1994 Italy
1997 Finland
2003 Finland
2004 Czech Republic
2007 Russia
2015 Czech Republic
2016 Russia
1933 Czechoslovakia
1936 Garmisch-PartenkirchenTeam
1949 Sweden
1954 Sweden
1960 Squaw ValleyTeam
1962 United States
1985 Czechoslovakia
1989 Sweden
1991 Finland
1996 Austria
2005 Austria
2008 Canada
2009 Switzerland
2017 Germany/France
1956 Cortina d'AmpezzoTeam
1966 Yugoslavia
1967 Austria
1978 Czechoslovakia
1982 Finland
1983 West Germany
1986 Soviet Union
1995 Sweden
Winter Universiade
1981 Jaca
1991 Sapporo
2007 TurinTeam
2013 TrentinoTeam
1972 Lake Placid
2001 Zakopane
2009 Harbin
1968 Innsbruck
1987 Štrbské Pleso
1997 Muju-Jeonju
1999 Poprad-Tatry
2003 Tarvisio
2011 Erzurum

The Canadian national men's ice hockey team (popularly known as Team Canada; French: Équipe Canada) is the ice hockey team representing Canada internationally. The team is overseen by Hockey Canada, a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation. From 1920 until 1963, Canada's international representation was by senior amateur club teams. Canada's national men's team was founded in 1963 by Father David Bauer as a part of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association, playing out of the University of British Columbia.[3] The nickname "Team Canada" was first used for the 1972 Summit Series and has been frequently used to refer to the Canadian national team ever since.

Canada is the leading national ice hockey team in international play, winners of the 1972 Summit Series against the Soviet Union, four of five Canada Cups dating back to 1976, nine Olympic gold medals (the most in the world), including three of the last five: Salt Lake City 2002, Vancouver 2010, and Sochi 2014. They are 26-time IIHF World Champions and winner of the 2004 and 2016 World Cup of Hockey. Canada is a member of the so-called "Big Six", the unofficial group of the six strongest men's ice hockey nations, along with the Czech Republic, Finland, Russia, Sweden and the United States.[4]

History

Hockey is Canada's national winter sport, and Canadians are extremely passionate about the game. Canada was first represented internationally at the 1910 European Championships by the Oxford Canadians, a team of Canadians from the University of Oxford. They represented Canada again at the 1912 World Championships.

From 1920 until 1963, the senior amateur club teams representing Canada, were usually the most recent Allan Cup champions. The last amateur club team from Canada to win a gold medal at the World Championship was the Trail Smoke Eaters in 1961. Following the 1963 World Championships, Father David Bauer founded the national team as a permanent institution. The new permanent national team first competed at the 1964 Winter Olympics.

Before the Soviet Union began international competition in 1954, Canada dominated international hockey, winning six out of seven golds at the Olympics and 10 World Championship gold medals. Canada then went 50 years without winning the Winter Olympic Gold medal and from 1962 to 1993, didn't win any World Championships. This was in part because Canada's best professional players were unable to attend these events as they had commitments with their National Hockey League teams.

Canada withdrew from official IIHF events in 1970 and the National Team program was suspended after they were refused permission to use semi-professional players at the World Championship. Canada returned to the IIHF in 1977 after a series of negotiations between IIHF President Dr. Sabetzki and top officials of professional ice hockey in Canada and the United States. As a result, professionals are allowed to compete at the World Championship and the tournament is scheduled later in the year to ensure more players are available from among the NHL teams eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs. In return, a competition for the "Canada Cup" was to be played every four years on North American territory with the participation of Canada, the United States, and the four strongest European national teams, including professionals.

In 1983, Hockey Canada began the "Program of Excellence", whose purpose was to prepare a team for the Winter Olympics every four years. This new National Team played a full season together all over the world against both national and club teams, and often attracted top NHL prospects. In 1986, the International Olympic Committee voted to allow professional athletes to compete in Olympic Games, starting in 1988.[5] Veteran pros with NHL experience and, in a few cases, current NHLers who were holding out in contract disputes joined the team. This program was discontinued in 1998, when the NHL began shutting down to allow its players to compete.

After not winning a gold medal for 33 years, Canada won the 1994 World Championship in Italy. Since that time, they have won in 1997, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2015 and 2016. Canada captured its first Olympic gold medal in 50 years at Salt Lake City 2002. At Vancouver 2010, Canada won the gold medal with a 3–2 win against the United States in the final. Sidney Crosby's overtime goal secured Canada the final gold medal awarded at the Games.[6] At the 2012 World Championship in Finland and Sweden, Ryan Murray became the first draft eligible prospect to represent Canada at the Ice Hockey World Championship.

Canada successfully defended gold at Sochi 2014, becoming the first men's team to do so since the Soviet Union in 1988, the first to finish the tournament undefeated since 1984 and the first to do both with a full NHL participation. Their relentless offensive pressure and stifling defence has earned the 2014 squad praise as perhaps the best, most complete Team Canada ever assembled.[7] Drew Doughty and Shea Weber led the team in scoring, while Jonathan Toews scored the gold medal-winning goal in the first period of a 3–0 win over Sweden in the final. The architect behind the 2010 and 2014 teams, Steve Yzerman, immediately stepped down as general manager following the win.[8]

Led by general manager Jim Nill, head coach Todd McLellan, and the late addition of captain Sidney Crosby, Canada won the 2015 IIHF World Championship in dominating fashion over Russia, their first win at the Worlds since 2007. By winning all 10 of their games in regulation, Hockey Canada was awarded a 1 million Swiss franc bonus prize in the first year of its existence.[9] Canada scored 66 goals in their 10 games and had the top three scorers of the tournament: Jason Spezza, Jordan Eberle and Taylor Hall. Tyler Seguin also led the championship with nine goals. The win secured Canada’s return to number one on the IIHF world rankings for the first time since 2010.[10]

List of teams representing Canada from 1920 to 1963

EventTeamHometown
1920 Summer OlympicsWinnipeg FalconsWinnipeg, Manitoba
1924 Winter OlympicsToronto GranitesToronto, Ontario
1928 Winter OlympicsUniversity of TorontoToronto, Ontario
1930 World ChampionshipsToronto CCMsToronto
1931 World ChampionshipsUniversity of ManitobaWinnipeg, Manitoba
1932 Winter OlympicsWinnipeg Hockey ClubWinnipeg, Manitoba
1933 World ChampionshipsToronto National Sea FleasToronto, Ontario
1934 World ChampionshipsSaskatoon QuakersSaskatoon, Saskatchewan
1935 World ChampionshipsWinnipeg MonarchsWinnipeg, Manitoba
1936 Winter OlympicsPort Arthur BearcatsPort Arthur, Ontario
1937 World ChampionshipsKimberley DynamitersKimberley, British Columbia
1938 World ChampionshipsSudbury WolvesSudbury, Ontario
1939 World ChampionshipsTrail Smoke EatersTrail, British Columbia
World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.
1947 World ChampionshipsDid not participate
1948 Winter OlympicsOttawa RCAF FlyersRCAF Station Trenton, Ontario
1949 World ChampionshipsSudbury WolvesSudbury, Ontario
1950 World ChampionshipsEdmonton MercurysEdmonton, Alberta
1951 World ChampionshipsLethbridge Maple LeafsLethbridge, Alberta
1952 Winter OlympicsEdmonton MercurysEdmonton, Alberta
1953 World ChampionshipsDid not participate
1954 World ChampionshipsEast York LyndhurstsEast York, Ontario
1955 World ChampionshipsPenticton VeesPenticton, British Columbia
1956 Winter OlympicsKitchener-Waterloo DutchmenKitchenerWaterloo, Ontario
1957 World ChampionshipsDid not participate
1958 World ChampionshipsWhitby DunlopsWhitby, Ontario
1959 World ChampionshipsBelleville McFarlandsBelleville, Ontario
1960 Winter OlympicsKitchener-Waterloo DutchmenKitchenerWaterloo, Ontario
1961 World ChampionshipsTrail Smoke EatersTrail, British Columbia
1962 World ChampionshipsGalt TerriersGalt, Ontario
1963 World ChampionshipsTrail Smoke EatersTrail, British Columbia

Competition achievements

Olympic Games

All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships. They have won a total of 15 Olympic medals.[11]

Games Representative GP W L T GF GA Coach Manager/GM Captain Finish Ref.
1920 Antwerp Winnipeg Falcons 3 3 0 0 21 1 Gordon Sigurjonson H. A. Axford Frank Fredrickson  Gold [12]
1924 Chamonix Toronto Granites 5 5 0 0 110 3 Frank Rankin William Hewitt Dunc Munro  Gold [13]
1928 St. Moritz University of Toronto Grads 3 3 0 0 38 0 Conn Smythe William Hewitt John Porter  Gold [14]
1932 Lake Placid Winnipeg Hockey Club 6 5 0 1 32 4 Jack Hughes Lou Marsh William Cockburn  Gold [15]
1936 Garmisch-
Partenkirchen
Port Arthur Bearcats 8 7 1 0 54 7 Al Pudas Malcolm Cochrane Herman Murray  Silver [16]
1948 St. Moritz Ottawa RCAF Flyers 8 7 0 1 69 5 Frank Boucher Sandy Watson George Mara  Gold [17]
1952 Oslo Edmonton Mercurys 8 7 0 1 71 14 Lou Holmes Jim Christianson Billy Dawe  Gold [18]
1956 Cortina d'Ampezzo Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 8 6 2 0 53 12 Bobby Bauer Ernie Goman Jack McKenzie  Bronze [19]
1960 Squaw Valley Kitchener-Waterloo Dutchmen 7 6 1 0 55 15 Bobby Bauer Ernie Goman Harry Sinden  Silver [20]
1964 Innsbruck 7 5 2 0 32 17 David Bauer Bob Hindmarch Hank Akervall 4th [21]
1968 Grenoble 7 5 2 0 28 15 Jackie McLeod David Bauer Marshall Johnston  Bronze [22]
1972 Sapporo Did not participate
1976 Innsbruck Did not participate
1980 Lake Placid 6 3 3 0 29 18 Lorne Davis
Clare Drake
Tom Watt
Rick Noonan Randy Gregg 6th [23]
1984 Sarajevo 7 4 3 0 24 16 Dave King Dave King Dave Tippett 4th [24]
1988 Calgary 8 5 2 1 31 21 Dave King Dave King Trent Yawney 4th [25]
1992 Albertville 8 6 2 0 37 17 Dave King Dave King Brad Schlegel  Silver [26]
1994 Lillehammer 8 5 2 1 27 19 Tom Renney George Kingston Fabian Joseph  Silver [27]
1998 Nagano 6 4 2 0 19 8 Marc Crawford Bobby Clarke Eric Lindros[28] 4th [29]
2002 Salt Lake City 6 4 1 1 22 14 Pat Quinn Wayne Gretzky Mario Lemieux  Gold
2006 Turin 6 3 3 0 15 11 Pat Quinn Wayne Gretzky Joe Sakic 7th
2010 Vancouver 7 6 1 32 14 Mike Babcock Steve Yzerman Scott Niedermayer  Gold [30]
2014 Sochi 6 6 0 17 3 Mike Babcock Steve Yzerman Sidney Crosby  Gold
2018 Pyeongchang 6 4 2 21 12 Willie Desjardins Sean Burke Chris Kelly  Bronze

World Championships

All Olympic ice hockey tournaments between 1920 and 1968 also counted as World Championships.[11] World Championships were not held during the Winter Olympic years of 1980, 1984 or 1988.[11]

YearLocationResult
1920Antwerp, BelgiumGold
1924Chamonix, FranceGold
1928St. Moritz, SwitzerlandGold
1930Chamonix, France; Berlin, Germany; Vienna, AustriaGold
1931Krynica, PolandGold
1932Lake Placid, USGold
1933Prague, CzechoslovakiaSilver
1934Milan, ItalyGold
1935Davos, SwitzerlandGold
1936Garmisch-Partenkirchen, GermanySilver
1937London, Great BritainGold
1938Prague, CzechoslovakiaGold
1939Zürich / Basel, SwitzerlandGold
World Championships not held from 1940–1946 during World War II.
Canada did not participate in 1947.
1948St. Moritz, SwitzerlandGold
1949Stockholm, SwedenSilver
1950London, Great BritainGold
1951Paris, FranceGold
1952Oslo, NorwayGold
Canada did not participate in 1953.
1954Stockholm, SwedenSilver
1955Krefeld / Dortmund / Cologne, West GermanyGold
1956Cortina d'Ampezzo, ItalyBronze
Canada did not participate in 1957.
1958Oslo, NorwayGold
1959Prague / Bratislava, CzechoslovakiaGold
1960Squaw Valley, USSilver
1961Geneva / Lausanne, SwitzerlandGold
1962Colorado Springs / Denver, USSilver
1963Stockholm, Sweden4th place
1964Innsbruck, Austria4th place
1965Tampere, Finland4th place
1966Ljubljana, YugoslaviaBronze
1967Vienna, AustriaBronze
1968Grenoble, FranceBronze
1969Stockholm, Sweden4th place
Canada did not participate in IIHF events from 1970–1976.
1977Vienna, Austria4th place
1978Prague, CzechoslovakiaBronze
1979Moscow, Soviet Union4th place
1981Gothenburg / Stockholm, Sweden4th place
1982Helsinki / Tampere, FinlandBronze
1983Düsseldorf / Dortmund / Munich, West GermanyBronze
1985Prague, CzechoslovakiaSilver
1986Moscow, Soviet UnionBronze
1987Vienna, Austria4th place
1989Stockholm / Södertälje, SwedenSilver
1990Bern / Fribourg, Switzerland4th place
1991Turku / Helsinki / Tampere, FinlandSilver
1992Prague / Bratislava, Czechoslovakia8th place
1993Dortmund / Munich, Germany4th place
1994Bolzano / Canazei / Milan, ItalyGold
1995Stockholm / Gävle, SwedenBronze
1996Vienna, AustriaSilver
1997Helsinki / Turku / Tampere, FinlandGold
1998Zürich / Basel, Switzerland6th place
1999Oslo / Lillehammer / Hamar, Norway4th place
2000Saint Petersburg, Russia4th place
2001Cologne / Hanover / Nuremberg, Germany5th place
2002Gothenburg / Karlstad / Jönköping, Sweden6th place
2003Helsinki / Tampere / Turku, FinlandGold
2004Prague / Ostrava, Czech RepublicGold
2005Innsbruck / Vienna, AustriaSilver
2006Riga, Latvia4th place
2007Moscow / Mytishchi, RussiaGold
2008Quebec City / Halifax, CanadaSilver
2009Bern / Kloten, SwitzerlandSilver
2010Cologne / Mannheim / Gelsenkirchen, Germany7th place
2011Bratislava / Košice, Slovakia5th place
2012Helsinki, Finland / Stockholm, Sweden5th place
2013Stockholm, Sweden / Helsinki, Finland5th place
2014Minsk, Belarus5th place
2015Prague / Ostrava, Czech RepublicGold
2016Moscow / Saint Petersburg, RussiaGold
2017Cologne, Germany / Paris, FranceSilver
2018Copenhagen / Herning, Denmark4th place

Summit Series

Canada Cup

  • 1976 Champions
  • 1981 – Runners-up
  • 1984 Champions
  • 1987 Champions
  • 1991 Champions

World Cup of Hockey

Spengler Cup

In the Spengler Cup, Team Canada competes against European club teams such as HC Davos who host the tournament every year in Vaillant Arena. Canada was initially represented by the standing national team at this event, but subsequently is usually made up of Canadians playing in European leagues or the AHL. Team Canada has won a total of 15 Spengler Cups, which is tied with the host team HC Davos for the most titles.

ResultsYears
Winner1984, 1986, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017
Runners-up1985, 1988, 1990, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2010
Third Place1989, 1991, 1994, 1999, 2004, 2009

Team

Current roster

Roster for the 2018 IIHF World Championship.[31][32]

Head coach: Bill Peters

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1GMichael DiPietro1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)91 kg (201 lb)September 6, 1999 Windsor Spitfires
3DJoel Edmundson1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)98 kg (216 lb)June 28, 1993 St. Louis Blues
5DAaron Ekblad1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)98 kg (216 lb)February 7, 1996 Florida Panthers
6DRyan Pulock1.89 m (6 ft 2 in)98 kg (216 lb)October 6, 1994 New York Islanders
7FJordan Eberle1.82 m (6 ft 0 in)85 kg (187 lb)May 15, 1990 New York Islanders
8FKyle Turris1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)86 kg (190 lb)August 14, 1989 (aged 28) Nashville Predators
10FBrayden SchennA1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)86 kg (190 lb)August 22, 1991 St. Louis Blues
11FJean-Gabriel Pageau1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)84 kg (185 lb)November 11, 1992 Ottawa Senators
12FJosh Bailey1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)92 kg (203 lb)October 2, 1989 New York Islanders
13FMathew Barzal1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)86 kg (190 lb)May 26, 1997 New York Islanders
17FJaden Schwartz1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)87 kg (192 lb)June 25, 1992 St. Louis Blues
18FPierre-Luc Dubois1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)94 kg (207 lb)June 24, 1998 Columbus Blue Jackets
21FTyson Jost1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)86 kg (190 lb)March 17, 1998 Colorado Avalanche
25DDarnell Nurse1.93 m (6 ft 4 in)101 kg (223 lb)February 4, 1995 Edmonton Oilers
27DRyan Murray1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)93 kg (205 lb)September 27, 1993 Columbus Blue Jackets
30GCurtis McElhinney1.87 m (6 ft 2 in)91 kg (201 lb)May 23, 1983 Toronto Maple Leafs
35GDarcy Kuemper1.95 m (6 ft 5 in)97 kg (214 lb)May 5, 1990 Arizona Coyotes
44DMarc-Edouard Vlasic1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)93 kg (205 lb)March 30, 1987 San Jose Sharks
52DThomas Chabot1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)86 kg (190 lb)January 30, 1997 Ottawa Senators
53FBo Horvat1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)101 kg (223 lb)May 4, 1995 Vancouver Canucks
55DColton Parayko1.96 m (6 ft 5 in)97 kg (214 lb)May 12, 1993 St. Louis Blues
72FAnthony Beauvillier1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)81 kg (179 lb)June 8, 1997 New York Islanders
90FRyan O'ReillyA1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)96 kg (212 lb)February 7, 1991 Buffalo Sabres
93FRyan Nugent-Hopkins1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)84 kg (185 lb)April 12, 1993 Edmonton Oilers
97FConnor McDavidC1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)85 kg (187 lb)January 13, 1997 Edmonton Oilers

Coaches

List of coaches of the Canada men's national ice hockey team.

Olympics
  1. Gordon Sigurjonson, 1920
  2. Frank Rankin, 1924
  3. Conn Smythe, 1928
  4. Jack Hughes, 1932
  5. Al Pudas, 1936
  6. Sgt. Frank Boucher, 1948
  7. Louis Holmes, 1952
  8. Bobby Bauer, 1956, 1960
  9. Father David Bauer, 1964
  10. Jackie McLeod, 1968
  11. Lorne Davis, Clare Drake, Tom Watt (co-coaches), 1980
  12. Dave King, 1984, 1988, 1992
  13. Tom Renney, 1994
  14. Marc Crawford, 1998
  15. Pat Quinn, 2002, 2006
  16. Mike Babcock, 2010, 2014
  17. Willie Desjardins, 2018
Summit Series, Canada Cup, World Cup
  1. Harry Sinden, 1972 Summit Series
  2. Bill Harris, 1974 Summit Series
  3. Scotty Bowman, 1976, 1981 Canada Cups
  4. Glen Sather, 1984 Canada Cup
  5. Mike Keenan, 1987 and 1991 Canada Cups
  6. Glen Sather, 1996 World Cup
  7. Pat Quinn, 2004 World Cup
  8. Mike Babcock, 2016 World Cup
World Championships
  1. Les Allen, 1930
  2. Blake Wilson, 1931
  3. Harold Ballard, 1933
  4. Johnny Walker, 1934
  5. Scotty Oliver, 1935
  6. John Achtzener, 1937
  7. Max Silverman, 1938
  8. Elmer Piper, 1939
  9. Max Silverman, 1949
  10. Jimmy Graham, 1950
  11. Dick Gray, 1951
  12. Greg Currie, 1954
  13. Grant Warwick, 1955
  14. Sid Smith, 1958
  15. Ike Hildebrand, 1959
  16. Lloyd Roubell, 1961, 1962
  17. Bobby Kromm, 1963
  18. Gordon Simpson, 1965
  19. Jackie McLeod, 1966, 1967, 1969
  20. Johnny Wilson, 1977
  21. Harry Howell, 1978
  22. Marshall Johnston, 1979
  23. Don Cherry, 1981
  24. Red Berenson, 1982
  25. Dave King, 1983
  26. Doug Carpenter, 1985
  27. Pat Quinn, 1986
  28. Dave King, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992
  29. Mike Keenan, 1993
  30. George Kingston, 1994
  31. Tom Renney, 1995, 1996
  32. Andy Murray, 1997, 1998
  33. Mike Johnston, 1999
  34. Tom Renney, 2000
  35. Wayne Fleming, 2001, 2002
  36. Andy Murray, 2003
  37. Mike Babcock, 2004
  38. Marc Habscheid, 2005, 2006
  39. Andy Murray, 2007
  40. Ken Hitchcock, 2008
  41. Lindy Ruff, 2009
  42. Craig MacTavish, 2010
  43. Ken Hitchcock, 2011
  44. Brent Sutter, 2012
  45. Lindy Ruff, 2013
  46. Dave Tippett, 2014
  47. Todd McLellan, 2015
  48. Bill Peters, 2016
  49. Jon Cooper, 2017
  50. Bill Peters, 2018

See also

References

  1. "A century of Jerseys". Hockey Canada. Retrieved 2018-01-12.
  2. "Hockey Canada Logo Guidelines" (PDF). HockeyCanada.ca. Hockey Canada. March 27, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  3. Hockey Canada
  4. "NHL announces World Cup of Hockey for 2016". The Canadian Press. 2015-01-24. Retrieved January 29, 2015.
  5. Monsebraaten, Laurie (October 15, 1986). "Players in NHL are now eligible in the Olympics". Toronto Star.
  6. "Canada win thrilling final gold of Winter Olympics". BBC Sport. February 28, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  7. "Sochi hockey squad one of the greatest Canada has ever iced". Toronto Sun. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  8. "Steve Yzerman steps down as GM after Team Canada wins gold". Sports Illustrated. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  9. "Will Canada hit jackpot?". IIHF. Retrieved 16 May 2015.
  10. "Canada wins first hockey worlds gold since 2007". ESPN. Retrieved 19 May 2015.
  11. 1 2 3 Hockey Canada-IIHF World Men's championship
  12. Podnieks 1997, pp. 1–10
  13. Podnieks 1997, pp. 11–22
  14. Podnieks 1997, pp. 23–32
  15. Podnieks 1997, pp. 33–40
  16. Podnieks 1997, pp. 41–52
  17. Podnieks 1997, pp. 53–66
  18. Podnieks 1997, pp. 67–78
  19. Podnieks 1997, pp. 79–88
  20. Podnieks 1997, pp. 89–100
  21. Podnieks 1997, pp. 101–112
  22. Podnieks 1997, pp. 113–124
  23. Podnieks 1997, pp. 137–146
  24. Podnieks 1997, pp. 147–158
  25. Podnieks 1997, pp. 159–172
  26. Podnieks 1997, pp. 173–182
  27. Podnieks 1997, pp. 183–194
  28. Lapointe, Joe (February 1, 1998). "NAGANO '98; Wearing C, for Canada". The New York Times. Retrieved March 30, 2009.
  29. Wallechinsky 2002, p. 31
  30. Elliott, Helene (February 28, 2010). "Canada defeats U.S., 3–2, to win gold medal in men's hockey". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 1, 2010.
  31. Hockey Canada
  32. 2018 IIHF World Championship roster
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