Beijing–Shanghai railway

Beijing–Shanghai railway
The Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge, an important part of the railway, was opened for traffic in 1968
Overview
Type Heavy rail
System China Railways
Status In operation
Locale Beijing, Hebei, Tianjin, Shandong, Jiangsu, and Shanghai
Termini Beijing
Shanghai
Stations 89
Operation
Opened 1968
Operator(s) China Railways
Technical
Line length 1,451.4 km (901.9 mi)
Number of tracks 2
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Electrification 25 kV AC
Operating speed
  • 160–200 kilometres per hour (99–124 mph) (operations)
  • 200–250 kilometres per hour (120–160 mph) (design)
Signalling ABS
Route map

0
Beijing
8.6
Beijing South
Fengtai
to Fengtai West marshalling yard
33.1
Huangcun
73.2
Langfang North
Yangcun
Jizhou
Hangouzhen
Tianjin–Bazhou railway
Bazhou
Beicang
Nancang marshalling yard
136.1
Tianjin West
Shuohuang Railway
Shenchi South
Huanghua Port
251.2
Cangzhou
291.5
Botou
Shijiazhuang–Dezhou railway
365.8
Dezhou
Huangheya
Deda Railway
Dajiawa
Pingyuan
Hándān South
Yancheng North
Yancheng
New Jinan Yellow River Bridge,
Luokou Yellow River Bridge
Qiaonan (South Bridge)
from Jinan Railway
470
Jixi marshalling yard
Jinan
to Jinan Railway
Dangjiazhuang
Taifei Railway
Feicheng
555.8
Taishan
Laiwu
Watang – Jufeng
Ciyao
Dongdu, Laiwu East
Luzhou North marshalling yard
640.4
Zhangzhou
Chengjiazhuang
Rizhao
673
Zoucheng
Jingting
Jingting–Linyi railway
Zhu Bao
735.5
Zaozhuang West
Xuzhou North marshalling yard
802.9
Xuzhou
Lianyungang
Fuliji–Jiahezhai railway
Huaibei
Fuliji (now freight only)
Suzhou–Huai'an railway
Huai'an
877.9
Suzhou
Huai River Bridge
968.2
Bengbu
Shuijiahu–Bengbu railway
Shuijiahu
Bengbu South link
Bengbu East marshalling yard
link to Shuijiahu–Bengbu railway
Jiangqiao
1094.4
Chuzhou North
Yongningzhen
(no passengers or freight now)
Nantong
Linchang (now freight only)
Yangtze River Bridge
link to Nanjing West
1150.1
Nanjing
Tongling
Nanjing East marshalling yard
Qixia Mountain Tunnel
1213.9
Zhenjiang
1242.1
Danyang
1286.3
Changzhou
1325.4
Wuxi
Suzhou West freight yard
1367.7
Suzhou
1402.2
Kunshan
Lujiabang
Nanxiang marshalling yard
Shanghai West
1451.4
Shanghai
Shanghai passenger train depot

The Beijing–Shanghai railway or Jinghu railway (simplified Chinese: 铁路; traditional Chinese: 京滬鐵路; pinyin: Jīng tiĕ) is a railway line between Beijing and Shanghai.

The line has a total length of 1,462 km (908 mi) and connects the municipalities of Beijing, Tianjin, and Shanghai, as well as the provinces of Hebei, Shandong, Anhui and Jiangsu. It is commonly referred to as the Jinghu railway, taking on the abbreviated names of the two terminal cities. In Chinese, Jing means "capital" and refers to Beijing, and Hu is the abbreviated name for Shanghai.

History

The Beijing–Shanghai railway is composed of three sections. These three sections are some of the earliest railways in China, built before 1910 during the Qing dynasty. The first section is from Beijing to Tianjin, constructed as part of the Imperial Railways of Northern China between 1897 and 1900.

The second section is from Tianjin to Pukou  a suburb of Nanjing  and used to be called the Tianjin–Pukou railway.

The third section is from Nanjing to Shanghai, built between 1905 and 1908. This section is called Shanghai–Nanjing railway. During 1927–1949, however, when China's capital was Nanjing, this section alone was called the "Jinghu" railway.

Between Pukou and Xiaguan, the railway crosses the Yangtze River. Before the completion of the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge in 1968, the trains were ferried across car-by-car. Passengers could also disembark at Nanjing North (Pukou), take a passenger ferry, and take a train again at the then Nanjing main station south of the river (now known as Nanjing West).

After the Nanjing Yangtze River Bridge was completed in 1968, these three sections were linked together and renamed as a single Beijing–Shanghai or Jinghu railway.

Current status

The railway line is the principal line between Beijing and Shanghai and along with the Beijing–Shanghai high-speed railway, it serves as one of the busiest rail corridors in China. It has dual tracks between Beijing and Shanghai, and the full length of the railway has been electrified. The entire line is dual tracked. Passenger rail service now offers overnight service on CRH Sleepers (D-series trains).

D type express overnight sleeper bullet trains have now commenced operation between Beijing and Shanghai. There are currently 3 overnight D bullet trains. Overnight Bullet trains take between 9 hours and 59 minutes to 11 hours, 47 minutes to complete the trip and are Soft sleeper only.

On June 30, 2011, the Beijing–Shanghai high-speed railway opened and runs roughly parallel to the Beijing–Shanghai railway. The opening of the high-speed railway relieved the Beijing–Shanghai railway from overcrowding, and it's increasingly shifted to freight traffic. As of 2017, two regular trains per day go the full way from Beijing to Shanghai on the old line, although hundreds of trains still use selected sections of it.

See also

References

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