25TFM-NBOMe

25TFM-NBOMe
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
Chemical and physical data
Formula C19H22F3NO3
Molar mass 369.377 g/mol
3D model (JSmol)
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25TFM-NBOMe (also known as NBOMe-2C-TFM, 2C-TFM-NBOMe, and Cimbi-138) is a derivative of the phenethylamine hallucinogen 2C-TFM, discovered in 2004 by Ralf Heim at the Free University of Berlin.[1] It acts as a potent partial agonist for the 5HT2A receptor, though its relative potency is disputed, with some studies finding it to be of lower potency than 25I-NBOMe,[2][3] while others show it to be of similar or higher potency,[4] possibly because of differences in the assay used.[5] 2C-TFM-NB2OMe can be taken to produce psychedelic effects similar to 2C-I-NB2OMe and 2C-D-NB2OMe.

Legality

United Kingdom

This substance is a Class A drug in the United Kingdom as a result of the N-benzylphenethylamine catch-all clause in the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.[6]

See also

References

  1. Ralf Heim PhD. Synthese und Pharmakologie potenter 5-HT2A-Rezeptoragonisten mit N-2-Methoxybenzyl-Partialstruktur. Entwicklung eines neuen Struktur-Wirkungskonzepts. (German)
  2. Maria Silva PhD. Theoretical study of the interaction of agonists with the 5-HT2A receptor. Universität Regensburg, 2009.
  3. Silva ME, Heim R, Strasser A, Elz S, Dove S (January 2011). "Theoretical studies on the interaction of partial agonists with the 5-HT(2A) receptor". Journal of Computer-aided Molecular Design. 25 (1): 51–66. doi:10.1007/s10822-010-9400-2. PMID 21088982.
  4. Ettrup, A.; Hansen, M.; Santini, M. A.; Paine, J.; Gillings, N.; Palner, M.; Lehel, S.; Herth, M. M.; Madsen, J.; et al. (2010). "Radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of a series of substituted 11C-phenethylamines as 5-HT2A agonist PET tracers". European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. 38 (4): 681–93. doi:10.1007/s00259-010-1686-8. PMID 21174090.
  5. Martin Hansen PhD. Design and Synthesis of Selective Serotonin Receptor Agonists for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of the Brain. University of Copenhagen, 2011.
  6. "The Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (Ketamine etc.) (Amendment) Order 2014". www.legislation.gov.uk.
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