Question about assimilation

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Good day [ɡʊd deɪ] and at timet taɪm] - is it a partial assimilation(loss of plossion), or maybe complete assimilation like in horse-shoe?

And what about don’t you ? I know there's a form doncha [ˈdoʊntʃə] - is it a reduction? Or some other process?

user11312

Posted 2015-04-20T12:11:40.027

Reputation:

2Transitioning rapidly from the final dental [t] of "don't" to the initial palatal of "you" produces a sound like the "ch" in "church" because the breath for the vowel in "you" is beginning to be let out while the tongue is still pressed against the roof of the mouth (alveolo-palatally). The spelling "doncha" (so-called 'eye-dialect' ) is an attempt to reflect this informal-conversational pronunciation. – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2015-04-20T12:43:29.973

3It's called yod coalescence. – snailplane – 2015-04-20T12:49:04.397

Thanks,and what about assimilation? – None – 2015-04-20T17:04:36.200

Answers

1

Good day [ɡʊd deɪ] and at time [ət taɪm] - is it a partial assimilation(loss of plossion), or maybe complete assimilation like in horse-shoe?

In 'good day', you can call it 'complete assimilation' but there's a specific name for this.

This is called gemination/ consonant twinning or consonant lengthening.

In 'good day', the d geminates/ lengthens because 'good' ends with d and 'day' starts with d. In 'at time', the t geminates.

Gemination - Wikipedia

I disagree with omnidisciplinarianist's answer:

The assimilation of good day transforms [ɡʊd deɪ] to [ɡʊ deɪ].

The same can be said of at time which transforms [ət taɪm] to [ə taɪm].

This is not true at all.

[ɡʊd deɪ] does not transform to [ɡʊ deɪ], rather, it transforms to [ɡʊddeɪ], the d geminates/lenghthens.

Likewise, at time [ət] [taɪm] does not transform to [ə taɪm] (try it yourself - try saying at time with a single t, it will become 'atime' which is incorrect.)

Wistful

Posted 2015-04-20T12:11:40.027

Reputation: 4 155

1

The assimilation of good day transforms [ɡʊd deɪ] to [ɡʊ deɪ]. This is complete assimilation as the assimilated phoneme and assimilating phoneme fully coincide. The same can be said of at time which transforms [ət taɪm] to [ə taɪm].

Your third example of don't you is an intermediate assimilation. Many native English speakers assimilate it by altering it to [dəʊn'ju]. On the other hand, your example "doncha" is, as TRomano states, an attempt to reflect informal-conversational pronunciation.

Omnidisciplinarianist

Posted 2015-04-20T12:11:40.027

Reputation: 2 600

The same can be said of at time which transforms [ət taɪm] to [ə taɪm] --- That's incorrect. Try pronouncing at time with a single t, it becomes 'atime' which is incorrect. – Wistful – 2020-08-08T16:15:17.357