The usage of "regardless of"

2

2

Do my sentences sound natural? Do I use "regardless of" correctly?

  1. Regardless of how developed it is, every country has certain amount of rate poverty.
  2. Every country has certain amount of rate poverty, regardless of how developed (it is).
  3. Regardless of (the) country, there is certain amount of poverty in every country.
  4. Regardless of their race, religion or sex everyone deserves to be treat respectfully.
  5. Regardless of how busy you are, everybody needs a good sleep.
  6. You can not get on (I mean "to able to click or use a site") this website but it is regardless of your age or sex. It is about the country where you get IP address from.

Using it at the beginning or at the end of the sentence, does it make any change of a sentence's meaning or stress?

Mrt

Posted 2014-12-17T21:25:41.273

Reputation: 10 254

Answers

8

The meaning doesn't change whether you put it at the beginning of the sentence or the end, but the emphasis of the sentence changes slightly. I'll paraphrase one of your example sentences:

Regardless of the color of their hair, everyone deserves to be treated respectfully.

By beginning the sentence with regardless, I am focusing on hair color. I might be thinking "He didn't deserve to be treated badly just because he has red hair."

Everyone deserves to be treated respectfully, regardless of the color of their hair.

By putting the clause at the end, I'm emphasizing that every person should be treated with respect. I might be thinking "He shouldn't have been treated badly, even though he is a ginger does have red hair."

It's the same meaning with a subtle difference. In the first sentence, I emphasize that hair color is not a valid reason to treat someone disrespectfully and in the second, I emphasize that no person should be treated disrespectfully.

Your last example sentence is not one where I would use regardless because of the negative.

You can not get on this website but it is regardless of your age or sex.It is about the country where you get IP adress from.

The sentence says "You can't, but it is without considering your age". It would be clearer to say "You can no matter what your age, but you can't based on your IP address".

I might rephrase the first clause as a positive:

You may use this website regardless of your age or sex, but connections with IP addresses from certain countries are prohibited.

ColleenV

Posted 2014-12-17T21:25:41.273

Reputation: 11 270

2

These look good to me (native English speaker). The sixth one is 'correct' but a little strange sounding. I don't think 'regardless of' really fits the sentence. I would say it is more standard to use it in the middle than in the beginning. ie.

You cannot get into the nightclub unless you are invited, regardless of how much money you have or how pretty you are.

Regardless of how much money you have or how pretty you are, you cannot get into the nightclub unless you are invited.

Both are correct, but 4/5 times NES use the first one. Good luck!

Michael12

Posted 2014-12-17T21:25:41.273

Reputation: 21

2

First, "rate poverty" is incorrect. You should either say "poverty rate" or "amount of poverty". I've fixed this in my quotations below.

On to your question:

  1. Regardless of how developed it is, every country has a certain amount of poverty.

This sounds natural.

  1. Every country has a certain amount of poverty, regardless of how developed it is.

Also natural. The "it is" is necessary.

  1. Regardless of the country, there is a certain amount of poverty in every country.

This is redundant. "Regardless of the country" means the same thing as "in every country". Drop "Regardless of the country" from the sentence. You can also say "any country" instead of "every country".

  1. Regardless of their race, religion or sex everyone deserves to be treated respectfully.

I fixed the tense of "treat". This sentence is almost natural, but could use a comma after "sex". It would be more common to put "everyone deserves to be treated respectfully" first in the sentence, but either order works.

  1. Regardless of how busy you are, everyone needs a good night's sleep.

You can say that you had a good nap or a good rest, but "a good sleep" doesn't work. The normal way to say this is "a good night's sleep".

The rest of the sentence is almost natural. In casual speech you could get away with it. It would be better to make the subjects agree:

Regardless of how busy they are, everyone needs a good night's sleep.

Regardless of how busy you are, you still need a good night's sleep.

[This space intentionally left blank.]

  1. You cannot get on this web site but it is regardless of your age or sex. It is based on the country that is associated with your IP address.

The second sentence needs some work. I put one suggestion in my quote. Other options include "the country that your IP address comes from" or "the country where your IP address is located". You could also change "It" to something more specific.

The first sentence is almost natural. Again, you could probably get away with it in casual speech. It would be better to say:

You cannot get on this web site, but that has nothing to do with your age or sex.

or even:

Your inability to get on this web site has nothing to do with your age or sex.

That has better grammar, but it also sounds more formal.

I agree with Colleen's answer about the order of the sentences.

Adam Haun

Posted 2014-12-17T21:25:41.273

Reputation: 3 023