If "want to" be pronounced as wanna, then what about "wanted to" and "wants to" and etc

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If "want to" be pronounced as wanna, then what about "wanted to" and "wants to"?

If "have to" be pronounced as "hafda" and "has to" be pronounced as "hasda", then what about "had to"?

If "need to" be pronounced as "needa", then what about "needed to" and "needs to"?

Emmett Alexandrite Diocequeen

Posted 2014-07-30T14:53:11.723

Reputation: 1

Answers

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How these specific verb phrases are pronounced is going to depend on the accent and dialect of the person pronouncing them.

"Want to" can be pronounced may different ways. "Wanna." "Wunna." "Wanner." "Wunner." "Wanta." The same is true of all of the phrases you're asking about.

All of these people, however, will understand you if you pronounce the words fully and clearly. And you should hopefully be able to understand their slurred, grunted responses by context.

So the answer, unfortunately, is "it depends on who you ask."

For the record, as a native speaker of mid-Atlantic American English, if talking to a teenager, I'd expect to hear something along the lines of:

"wanted to" = "wanatoo"

"wants to" = "wantsta"

"had to" = "hadda"

"needed to" = "needed ta"

"needs to" = "needsta"

where the last "a" usually represents a schwa.

chapka

Posted 2014-07-30T14:53:11.723

Reputation: 5 375

It can't always be contracted to wanna, though. – snailplane – 2014-07-30T15:31:33.380

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"want to" = "wanna"
"wants to" = "wantsta"
"wanted to" = "wantedta" or "wannedta"

"have to" = "hafta" or "havta"
"has to" = "hasta" or "hazta"
"had to" = "hadda" or "hadta"

"need to" = "needa" or "needta"
"needs to" = "needsta" or "needsa"
"needed to" = "neededta" or "neededa"

Seamus Nanatchk

Posted 2014-07-30T14:53:11.723

Reputation: 377

needsa and neededa sound too much like needs a and needed a – Sam I am says Reinstate Monica – 2014-07-30T22:26:12.220

I don't disagree. They're all colloquial contractions, and poor ones at that.

The questioner should be advised that most people will frown on your use of these phonetic choices, but they are occasionally heard in conversation and in art. – Seamus Nanatchk – 2014-07-31T01:03:56.977