How can I remember the difference between "loose" and "lose"?

14

1

Although both words can be found in dictionaries, I'm constantly forgetting which one is which.

Are there any mnemonic rules that would help me remembering them?

bytebuster

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 7 759

Answers

22

Lose has lost one of its o's.
Loose has an extra o, like an extra hole in a loose knot.

(Honestly, though, remembering just the first one should be enough to get you through everyday life).

waiwai933

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 3 277

6

If I lose something, it has become lost not loost.

J.T. Grimes

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 191

1Loosened, surely? – toandfro – 2014-02-01T02:04:10.797

5But if you loose something, it does become loosed. – Flimzy – 2013-01-28T19:13:42.177

4

If the goose gets loose, you lose your job.

(2 o's in goose and loose. and they rhyme. once you know that, you're set.)

Nevis Rik

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 41

3

Looose (stretch the o) is nice and large, while lose is small and easy to misplace?

(nice and large, I guess like a pair of misfitting pants or something, I don't know)

Ryan Leonard

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 259

1

You have a regular spelling in loose, adjective, and a special spelling in to lose, verb. I would say the drop of one o is an optical help to distinguish the two words.

As a mnemonic help you can arrange alphabetically:

A adjective loose with Ŕegular spelling

V verb lose with Śpecial spelling.

Try if this helps. If not, you have to invent something better. I did such things sometimes with my pupils to improve their creativeness to invent memory aids on their own.

rogermue

Posted 2013-01-23T21:10:35.013

Reputation: 8 304