Can "A.K.A" be used also in speech or in writing only?

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Can "A.K.A" abbreviation be used also in the speech language or in the writing only?

If it can be used in speech, then are there another abbreviations (not of companies of course, or science) that we used them both in writing and speech?

Judicious Allure

Posted 2018-03-06T22:32:11.750

Reputation: 24 598

Just say the letters out loud. – Lambie – 2018-03-06T22:48:42.123

Answers

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I use aka in speech all the time. It's considered quite informal, and is often misused.

"I went to the crappy store, AKA Safeway."

"The President, AKA Trump, wants to put a tariff on steel."

"That one English forum, AKA StackExchange, is pretty fun."

There are so many abbreviations used in speech that it would be next to impossible to name them all for you. I even hear some of my friends, of course from a younger generation, say lol in some sentences, which I find to be a pretty comical one. DOA(dead on arrival) is one I hear used by some of my more technologically inclined friends. Those are just a couple, but show how you can easily use all kinds of abbreviations in your speech.

Element115

Posted 2018-03-06T22:32:11.750

Reputation: 2 737

1BTW (bee tee double-u) is also kind of a funny one. I do kind of like the abbreviated version "bee tee dubs," though. – spoko – 2018-03-06T22:47:18.937

Lol can be read as an initialism /el-oh-el/ but it is at least as common to read it as an acronym /lol/ to rhyme with doll – James K – 2018-03-06T23:39:13.673

Not sure if you're laughing out loud at my post or adding some new useful information – Element115 – 2018-03-06T23:41:06.573

@JamesK I've more often heard it to rhyme with roll. – user45266 – 2019-01-22T18:19:26.247

I suspect your accent is different from mine, to me (an RP speaker) doll is /dol/ and roll is /ɹəʊl/. But in GA, doll is /dɑl/ and roll is /ɹoʊl/. In the UK lol is /lol/ but in USA it might be /lɑl/ or /loʊl/. – James K – 2019-01-23T09:27:31.867

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It can be used in speech, where it is pronounced "ei-kei-ei". There are lots of examples of abbreviations that are spoken as letters:

  • Here's my id. (Ai-dee)
  • I've got a BA an MA and a PhD (bee-ei, em-ei, pee-aitch-dee)
  • Omg! I passed my SAT! (oh-em-gee, es-ei-tee)

James K

Posted 2018-03-06T22:32:11.750

Reputation: 80 781

2Can't forget the scene from American Graffiti: "I lost my ID in a flood." "I lost my wife too. Her name wasn't Idee though, and it wasn't in a flood." – spoko – 2018-03-06T22:45:49.060