Is the begining of the sentence with the zero article correct?

4

2

Can I use the zero article before Video in the following sentence? If yes, then why.

Video baby monitor is also great for prevention from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

trenccan

Posted 2017-09-15T19:29:53.597

Reputation: 436

7Note that you should write "prevention of" here, not "prevention from". – rjpond – 2017-09-15T19:40:08.917

Answers

12

No, you can't.

If you're talking about video baby monitors in general, you can say:

  • A video baby monitor is also great for prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), or
  • Video baby monitors are also great for prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

If you're talking about a specific video baby monitor or about a specific type or model of video baby monitor, you can say:

  • The video baby monitor is also great for prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), or
  • This video baby monitor is also great for prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

If it's a product sold as "Video Baby Monitor", you could write it without an article:

  • Video Baby Monitor is also great for prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

rjpond

Posted 2017-09-15T19:29:53.597

Reputation: 8 564

Digital encryption transmission will provide safe and private service of this device. - so in this sentence should also be the definite article? – trenccan – 2017-09-15T20:15:38.757

1No, it is correct because the transmission is uncountable word ;) I guess – trenccan – 2017-09-15T20:18:11.077

1True - although if it's for an article and follows on from previous sentences about the device, I would be more likely to begin the sentence with the words "Its digitally encrypted transmissions" (or "Their" if the previous sentence had been worded in the plural). If it's for a technical specification or bullet points or advertising copy then "Digitally encrypted transmission" is fine. – rjpond – 2017-09-15T20:31:15.947

2You should know that advertising copy and bullet lists are often telegraphic, meaning they leave out words that are required in Standard Written English. They are also often trying to be "hip" rather than "correct." Don't take them as a guideline for the Right Thing. – zwol – 2017-09-15T20:35:14.780