"We’d like to see the baby’s weight going steadily up."

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"We’d like to see the baby’s weight going steadily up."

Here, "going up" is gerund , and 'baby's weight' is the subject of gerund? Is my analysis correct?

Mickey Mouse

Posted 2017-03-05T20:38:00.307

Reputation: 445

The baby's weight is the object for the verb "see", going.. is gerund clause functioning as a complement(or object predicative). – user178049 – 2017-03-05T23:10:11.523

Is the following was the original sentences? is it kind of an adjective clause reduction?

"We’d like to see the baby’s weight (which is )going steadily up." or "We’d like to see the baby’s weight (which goes) steadily up." – Mickey Mouse – 2017-03-07T19:10:41.710

Answers

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We would like to see the baby's weight go steadily up.

If we change go to going:

We would like to see the baby's weight going steadily up.

the phrase going steadily up refers to what the baby's weight would be doing if it were doing what they would like to see it doing. I understand the semantic object of to see to be the entire phrase:

"the baby's weight going steadily up"

A which-clause does not express this idea. which goes steadily up describes what the weight always does, whereas the meaning of the original sentence is that sometimes it does not go up, and that is something they do not like to see, and are not seeing. If they were seeing it go up, the sentence would say:

We like to see the baby's weight going steadily up.

But the original says would like to see, which refers to something that is not actual at this moment.

Tᴚoɯɐuo

Posted 2017-03-05T20:38:00.307

Reputation: 116 610