Conjunction of infinitive and gerund

2

1

I wrote

A pallet car is designed to carry and sintering the pellets by the air-sweeping through the charge layer during the sintering belt movement

A pallet car carries some materials which pass a sintering process, then I avoid using "to carry and sinter" because the pallet car doesn't perform sintering, I may could say "for carrying and sintering", but I thought "to carry" is shorter.

How can I write it in a better way? Is it correct as it is?

How about

a pallet car is designed to carry and for sintering the pellets by the air-sweeping through the charge layer during the sintering belt movement

I know this is not a good and clear sentences but is it gramatical?

Ahmad

Posted 2016-09-01T14:41:50.163

Reputation: 8 443

2A pallet car conveys the pellets to the sintering stage. Your sentence is not grammatical. You cannot mix bare infinitive and participle like that (designed to carry and sintering). – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T14:44:02.880

Also as written you are associating sintering with a pallet car (the subject), which you say is incorrect. – user3169 – 2016-09-01T15:42:21.967

@tromano I modified the question a but. – Ahmad – 2016-09-01T15:56:31.417

If the pellets remain in or on the pallet car throughout the sintering process, then you can write "A pallet car conveys the pellets through the sintering phase". – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T15:56:49.963

Ungrammatical, sorry. Moreover, a pallet car is not designed for sintering. You said so yourself. – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T15:59:09.370

You seem to be fixated on the opening of your sentence. Not a good practice. You paint yourself into a corner . – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T15:59:48.273

Are you trying to say that the design of the pallet car is twofold: it acts as receptacle to hold the pellets, and it is also on a conveyance that brings the pellets to the sintering process? – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T16:00:58.730

Also, the phrase "by the air-sweeping" seems to be explaining what sintering is or how the sintering occurs. You are attempting to do too many things all at once. This is not an economy; your sentence is all tangled up in itself. Parse it out into separate sentences. – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T16:02:43.147

@tromano thanks I got that and can break my sentence but I am curious about the conjunction of "to do" and "for doing" – Ahmad – 2016-09-01T16:07:45.320

1@Ahmad You need *for doing* -- "designed to carry and for sintering &c". Design is not used with bare -ing forms: *designed sintering &c. But the non-parallel between infinitive and -ing form makes the sentence awkward; you would do better to write designed for carrying and sintering. – StoneyB on hiatus – 2016-09-01T16:34:28.607

@Ahmad: Even if you use a "designed for x and for y" construction, you still have to deal with the by-phrase. A by-phrase would complement a "designed to do x" construction but not a "designed for x" construction. We wouldn't say "The radiator is designed for cooling by radiating heat" but "The radiator is designed to cool by radiating heat". – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T17:32:47.873

@Ahmad: And if you're simply curious about whether a construction can be used, no matter how graceless or unclear, don't ask "how to write it in a better way?" – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-01T17:37:12.473

@TRomano yes, you are right! However if you note the paragraph before that request, I expressed my confusion to use "to carry" and "for carrying" and looked for a middle way. Anyway, yes you are right, my question was not straight and somehow cheap. – Ahmad – 2016-09-02T06:01:21.527

@TRomano and yes, and I think conjoining two verbs and saying ...to X and Y Z by W.., when Z is common object, then W should be complement of both verbs, while here "by" just refers to sintering while "the pellets" (the object) is common between "carry" and "sintering".... and that's probably ungrammatical – Ahmad – 2016-09-02T06:12:13.793

@Ahmad Your question was not cheap. The problem is that when you ask how to "write something in a better way", there are thousands of possible answers. Make your questions precise and specific, and ask about one usage at a time. That will permit us to provide a useful answer that benefits not just you, but those who ask the same question at a later date. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica – 2016-09-02T06:54:39.443

It's not just probably ungrammatical. That sentence is a heap of fragments. A pallet car is designed ... for sintering the pellets by the air-sweeping through the charge layer during the sintering-belt movement. It's a three-phrase pile-up on the grammatical turnpike. – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-02T10:59:48.737

A pallet car rides on a moving belt which conveys the car and its cargo of pellets to the sintering stage; the car is designed to allow air to sweep through the charge layer as the belt moves along. – Tᴚoɯɐuo – 2016-09-02T11:11:50.787

to carry and sinter or to carry and allow sintering – mplungjan – 2016-10-09T09:53:31.227

Answers

2

Others have pointed out problems with what you are trying to say, since the pallet car doesn't actually do any sintering, but merely coveys the pellets through the sintering process. As much as I personally prefer to use as few words as possible in a sentence, sometimes it's better to be verbose to help retain your intended meaning. After all, language is a tool for conveying information, and not just a nice way to string words together.

So while there are many "good" ways to form this sentence, this comment by TRomano is easily understood:

A pallet car rides on a moving belt which conveys the car and its cargo of pellets to the sintering stage; the car is designed to allow air to sweep through the charge layer as the belt moves along.

But to focus on the question posed in your title: it's not good English style to mix the infinitive and the gerund when forming lists or comparisons of related objects. Consider the following two sentences:

All she enjoys is to dance, to play, and singing.

All she enjoys is dancing, playing, and singing.

The second sentence is good style because all of the elements of the list are in the same form. Similarly the second sentence here is better than the first:

You should check your spelling, grammar, and punctuate properly.

You should check your spelling, grammar, and punctuation.

When describing what a particular mechanism does in a mechanical process, keep this rule in mind, as in the following:

The conveyor belt is designed to catch the outflow from the folding process, deliver the product to the sanitizing spray, and then deposit the sanitized product into the holding bin.

Andrew

Posted 2016-09-01T14:41:50.163

Reputation: 85 521