May I drop "is" in constructions like "as is shown by the example of..."?

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May I drop "is" in constructions like "as is shown by the example of..."?

On the one hand, such reduced variants can be met even in Wikipedia. But on the other hand, I don't quite understand its grammatical structure.

Serguei

Posted 2016-08-29T17:56:29.897

Reputation: 1 393

1Rather, "as is shown by" is an "expanded" variant! The verb "is" is superfluous in the construction you present, and so is not omitted in "as shown by the example." This is a common and proper use of as in its rôle as an adverb with the meaning "in the manner." E.g.: She sang as promised. He left as agreed. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica – 2016-08-29T19:37:20.263

Isn't it just a regular passive voice? "The body's mass is constant as was established by Newton" One cannot replace "at" here by "in the manner", I think – Serguei – 2016-08-29T20:29:21.960

2The clause is in the passive voice, yes. "Was" could be seen as similarly superfluous in that example. I wouldn't write it this way, but I wouldn't mind reading The body's mass is constant in the manner established by Newton. @StoneyB may like to weigh in here, though, because as is a contentious little fellow. He may make the case for an ellipsis of "is." (Also, the comma is our friend here: The body's mass is constant, in the manner established by Newton. ) – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica – 2016-08-29T20:48:15.403

@P.E.Dant nudge your comments seem to be enough for an answer and the upvotes on this question indicate some interest in it. – ColleenV – 2016-08-30T11:30:44.803

@ColleenV Nudge acknowledged. When time permits, I shall expand my comment into an answer, which will subsequently be debunked as utter hokum by StoneyB. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica – 2016-08-31T00:22:50.427

@P.E.Dant Lol, just mind your Ps and Qs when comes to the liguistical vocabulistics and we should be fine. – ColleenV – 2016-08-31T02:14:03.530

1Never trust any sentence you find on Wikipedia to be grammatically correct. Most of them are, but there are many that are horrendous. – Alan Carmack – 2016-08-31T23:44:33.150

Answers

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Rather than being a reduced variant, as is shown by in your example "as is shown by the example of" is an expanded variant!

The verb is is superfluous in the construction you present, and so is not omitted in as shown by the example. This is a common and proper use of as in its rôle as an adverb with the meaning "in the manner." See Dictionary.com, definition 4: She sang as promised. He left as agreed.

Your example phrase could thus be written as:

...in the manner/as is shown by the example of...

In commentary, you suggested another example:

The body's mass is constant as was established by Newton.

Likewise, "was" is superfluous here, and the sentence could be written as:

The body's mass is constant in the manner/as was established by Newton.

It may be possible to make the case for an ellipsis of the verb "is" (as your question suggests) but many writers prefer a solution which uses the fewest words.

p.s.: The comma clarifies the meaning of either usage:

The body's mass is constant, in the manner established by Newton.
The body's mass is constant, as (was) established by Newton.

P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica

Posted 2016-08-29T17:56:29.897

Reputation: 9 373